AR 25 yard zero question.


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C-grunt
November 7, 2009, 04:57 AM
So in the Army we would zero our rifles at 25 meters at 3/8 minus 2 and that would give us correct settings for our rear site.

Now I dont have any range that has a 25 meter line but I do have a 25 yard line. How far off would my zero be from my sites if I did the same zero at 25 yards? Any way to adjust for this so my rifle is properly zeroed?

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MarineOne
November 7, 2009, 08:25 AM
Since a meter is roughly 39.37 inches and a yard is 36 inches, out to 25 yards you're not going to see much difference on your POA/POI.

I've shot both on a meters course (Edson Range, Camp Pendleton) and on a yards course (Wilcox Range, Camp Pendleton) and you can easily adjust from meters/yards or yards/meters with a simply elevation change or "Kentucky windage".

The easy way to do it is to keep a range card with quick info on it like the following:

25 yards is 22.8m, 300 yards is 276m, 500 yards is 457m.

25m is 27 yards, 300m is 328 yards, and 500m is 546 yards.

All you need to do at this point is know your zero and then either add or subtract a click in elevation on the rear sight. Zeroed on a yards course, meters course would be +1 click. Zeroed on a meters course, yards would be -1 click.

Examples:
Shooting on a 300 yard range with a meters zero you would be 8/3 -1.
Shooting on a 300 meters range with a yards zero you would be 8/3 +1.
Shooting on a 500 yard range with a meters zero you would be 5 -1.
Shooting on a 500 meters range with a yards zero you would be 5 +1.


Kris

SalchaketJoe
November 7, 2009, 09:36 AM
Good old 8/3 minus 1.
Am now in the Air Force and the A2s we have wont adjust below 8/3. I believe I read that the Corps does something to the sight.

My M4gery with a red dot is zeroed at 50 yards. That is about dead on at 200 and like 8 inches low at 300(if i remember correct). The reality is, with a carbine and that sight sin magnification, 200 or so yards is about all you are gonna get. Less you can get into a nice tight prone position and get all known distance range range about it.

Semper Fi fellers.

Bartholomew Roberts
November 7, 2009, 10:40 AM
If you are using A2 sights, look up the Santose Improved Battlesight Zero (http://www.m4carbine.net/showthread.php?t=22).

This will give you a zero that actually works for practical shooting at the ranges you will most likely be using irons and you can still use the elevation adjustment if you want to play around with Service Rifle style shooting at longer ranges.

C-grunt
November 7, 2009, 03:20 PM
My M4gery with a red dot is zeroed at 50 yards. That is about dead on at 200 and like 8 inches low at 300(if i remember correct). The reality is, with a carbine and that sight sin magnification, 200 or so yards is about all you are gonna get. Less you can get into a nice tight prone position and get all known distance range range about it.

Semper Fi fellers.

Thats how my work AR is sighted in and it works really well. But my work AR also has a compact Acog so I dont have to worry about elevation clicks either.

I just want to be able to still use my elevation knob with some confidence when shooting at longer distances. My longest range is 300 yards but I will sometimes shoot longer out in the desert.

Quentin
November 8, 2009, 03:08 AM
Definitely look at the link Bartholomew Roberts posted. Amazing stuff, you can get your A2 sight two clicks under 8/3 for a 50yard/200meter IBZ zero. Anything else from 0-230 meters should be within 2.5" of POA if you and your rifle are up to snuff.

With the IBZ you can zero a 20" rifle at 50 yards if you can find a range with that. The M4 carbines IBZ zero at 41meters or about 45 yards.

There is a revised IBZ that adds a zero for 100 yards too.
http://www.ar15.com/forums/topic.html?b=3&f=18&t=328143

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