My reloading plan and purschases so far for your consideration...


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flomofo
November 8, 2009, 05:43 AM
I finally went into the local store and picked up an rcbs turret kit which came with some things I needed and most I didn't.

A)
I got the kit, the .45 acp carbide die kit, the hand held primer tool, the tumbler with walnut fill, the electronic dispenser and scale combo (pricey but hopefully a time saver), and some boxes for loading ammo and a can of lube in case I like spraying my cases instead of rolling them on a pad.

B)
My main question revolves around setting up this turret to make precision rifle rounds from .223 up to 30-06 and possibly 300 weatherby. Can this turret do it as well as the single stage?

Its main duty will be handgun rounds however, from 9mm, .38 special, .357 magnum, .44 special and magnum, .45 acp, and .45 colt for now.

C)
I was originally thinking of getting a rock chucker for the low volume rifle rounds and a progressive for the handguns and the .223 I plan to buy.


D) So should I return the turret while I still can and get something like the LNL or the new rcbs pro2000, and then add a rock chucker to do small batches?

Or can I adapt this turret to do everything? Time is more important than money for me up front, so I'm starting to wonder if something like the pro2000 can do everything I want?

I still plan on buying the electric debur/cleaning tool rcbs makes as well as some sort of electronic trimmer all in the name of efficiency, while still doing each step of the process needed to make a quality rifle or pistol cartridge.

I'm also checking to see if this turret just dumps primers on the floor as I'm stuck in an apartment for another few months and will be reloading in a room on some flimsly 10 dollar table.

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redneck2
November 8, 2009, 07:23 AM
I personally use a Dillon 550 for .45acp, 10mm, .45LC, .357 Herrett, .204 Ruger, .223, .22-250 .25-06, 7mm Rem Mag, .45-70 & .45-90. Probably some I forgot.

Time is more important than money for me up front, so I'm starting to wonder if something like the pro2000 can do everything I want?For me, money is not nearly important as time. I do NOT want to go to reload and spend 20 minutes re-adjusting, changing, etc. Also, I personally consider swapping powder measure inserts an invitation to disaster unless you use the same powder in all your pistols. I consider a single stage for pistol worse than torture.

I have tool heads including powder measure set up for each pistol caliber. If I want to swap calibers, it takes about 2-3 minutes IF I have to change primer and shell plate. Since the 550 is manual index, it is a single stage, progressive, and turret wrapped in one IMO.

I had a hand primer and gave it away. I had no use for it.

For powder measuring for rifles, I have an electronic PACT that automatically measures =/- .1 at the touch of a button.

loadedround
November 8, 2009, 10:07 AM
Flomofo:
I previously owned an Lyman All American press that was a four hole turret press and used it for close to 20 years until I replaced it with a Dillon 550. This press did anything I asked of it, loading both pistol and rifle ammunition of the same quality as my Dillon. The turret could be locked in one position if desired for even more precision loads. Your RCBS turret press will also do whatever you ask of it also and will still be useful if you go to a progressive press for your various rifle loads. My opionion...keep it! :)

flomofo
November 8, 2009, 03:09 PM
Thanks for the help, I assume if I go to a proressive from rcbs that I will be able to use my same dies.

I just wasn't sure if the pro 2000 could be used as a single stage like the rcbs turret or the 550.

I just know my handguns will be used most of the time, and the rifles will get a more rare outing.

flomofo
November 8, 2009, 03:17 PM
What is the caliber limitation on the pro-2000? Can't find it on their website and their not open to answer questions today.

dmazur
November 8, 2009, 05:25 PM
Additional die considerations -

While it is true that you can get almost any 7/8x14 die to fit in a progressive press, you may have trouble with cases hanging up on the square edges of the bottom of the pistol dies.

Dillon and Hornady (and others, I'm sure) make dies with rounded or beveled throats to help center the cases as they are all lifted into the dies simultaneously.

This feature is generally buried in the spec sheets for the dies, somewhere. It's important for progressive presses, but almost a non-problem for single stage and turret presses, where you can align the case by hand as you lift the ram.

ArchAngelCD
November 8, 2009, 09:31 PM
I reload my handgun ammo on a Lee 4 hole turret press. I can load 180 to 200 rounds per hour most times without rushing or sacrificing safety and quality. I was using the same turret press to load my rifle rounds but I removed the auto-index rod and used it as a single stage press. Since extra turrets are inexpensive I have all the dies setup on separate turrets and all I need to do is switch the turret when I reload a different caliber. I recently acquired a Rock Chucker II for loading my rifle rounds. It's much more solid and works better on my 30-06 and other large case calibers. Those setups work well for me...

rfwobbly
November 8, 2009, 10:34 PM
Flo -
A) OK

B) Yes. This type "turret" is nothing more than a single stage with a rotating carousel that keeps you from having to swap dies so often. Simply comparing list price to list price, I like the Lyman "T-Mag Expert Kit" better, which includes a case trimmer and the Lyman manual, at $60 less than RCBS with no case trimmer and the Speer book. One way or the other, you'll be buying a case trimmer and the Lyman book.

Either turret will make great handgun ammo. The question is what's the volume of handgun ammo. 50 per week is no problem; 500+ a week is a big problem.

C) OK

D) Since you're new you should try to find a new or used Rock Chucker or other strong O-frame press. Those 30-06 cases are going to require something strong and big. Then once you learn the process, safety steps, get your flow down, "earn your stripes", then you can go back and get a progressive.

If you bought a progressive now, you'd be totally confused and frustrated. Even the simple ones are very complicated; there's just too much going on. If you bought only a progressive today, you'd still be buying store ammo next week.

I use and enjoy a turret press as my "single-stage press", but I don't load big rifle cartridges. There's a lot you can do with a single-stage along with a progressive. You'll never be sorry you own a single-stage press, either a turret or O-frame.


In this hobby, being in a hurry, or "gotta gotta go right now" is a prescription for danger.

PS. Working on a flimsy $10 table is not going to work at all. You just don't understand the forces at work here. And with a progressive that does 4 or 5 cases at a time, it's 2 or 3 times more.

flomofo
November 9, 2009, 01:13 AM
I'll probably keep the turret press as I don't usually plan on shooting more than 100 to 200 rounds out of any one gun I own.

I'll probably also look for a rockchucker or maybe another single stage with a primer catcher as long as it can use all my rcbs dies.

Also tried looking for a sturdy and small work bench but found nothing that would work. You guys have any suggestion for this part? I'm on the second floor of an apartment, so having my dad weld another 2,000 pound table out of steel is out of the question until we move into our home in a few months.

The hardest part is finding brass, primers and even affordable bullets. I'm looking for recommendations on a good brand or source for range ammo as I figure I can't go wrong with nosler for hunting or defense casings and bullets.

flomofo
November 9, 2009, 01:33 AM
The turret has 6 slots, so shoul I just put two different three die sets on there...

Or ahould I run it with an extra crimp only die?

I assume the fourth die is just to save more time so you don't have to unscrew the seating die to crimp afterwards?

Mags
November 9, 2009, 02:40 AM
1 caliber per turret is the way to go. You don't have to fill up all the stations.

flomofo
November 10, 2009, 12:28 AM
so its worth buying a fourth taper or crimper die from rcbs for evey caliber I buy to save time?

John Wayne
November 10, 2009, 12:31 AM
I too am confinded to an apartment. Look into the Frankford Arsenal portable reloading stand. It's built for that purpose, and can easily be stored in a closet.

I plan on purchasing one soon, it's got pretty good reviews from customers on Midway USA.

Seedtick
November 10, 2009, 02:21 AM
flomofo - Also tried looking for a sturdy and small work bench but found nothing that would work. You guys have any suggestion for this part? I'm on the second floor of an apartment, so having my dad weld another 2,000 pound table out of steel is out of the question until we move into our home in a few months.

Have you looked at a Black & Decker Workmate (http://www.blackanddecker.com/productguide/product-details.aspx?productid=7812&toolview=2#details)? I'm still using mine while I'm trying to get my real bench built. I loaded some 7 mm mags today and FL sized them. It does help to add some weight to the workmate. :cool:

ST

nulfisin
November 10, 2009, 10:16 PM
There are plenty of good, free plans available. I bought a kit from Cabelas on sale, and other stores have similar products. It had all the connecting pieces and screws; I just needed to buy and the wood to construct the shelves and braces I wanted. Not a bad way to fit your work bench to your space.

smilin-buddha
November 11, 2009, 11:11 AM
Love to see some pictures. Of the workmate.

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