52 and 53 gr bullets


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ole farmerbuck
November 9, 2009, 10:48 PM
Why do companies make a 52gr and a 53gr bullet? Is there really enough differance to make both?

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ForneyRider
November 9, 2009, 11:17 PM
Match bullets.

52gr is boat tail.
53gr is flat based.

ole farmerbuck
November 9, 2009, 11:28 PM
Thanks

ants
November 9, 2009, 11:48 PM
I always guessed that the basic design was taken from a 55fmj profile. You make it a hollow point and lose 2 grains. You make the hollow point a boat tail and you lose another grain.

I could be wrong.

Byron
November 11, 2009, 12:12 PM
I have found for me, the flat base 53 grain is more accurate.Byron

jcwit
November 11, 2009, 01:56 PM
I have found exactly the same thing Byron, however I'm constantly being informed I don't know what I'm talking about even when I have the 1 hole groups at 100 yds to prove it.

ole farmerbuck
November 11, 2009, 04:23 PM
I have found exactly the same thing Byron, however I'm constantly being informed I don't know what I'm talking about even when I have the 1 hole groups at 100 yds to prove it.

Great! Now what am i going to do with all of those sierra 52gr bullets i just ordered?:banghead: I've never tried the 53gr bullets. I guess i should have before i ordered another bunch of 52gr's. Oh well, they've been doing good so far. I've never shot any of the Sierra's yet. Only shot Noslers and they seem good so far.

kelbro
November 11, 2009, 06:02 PM
Funny. I have one AR that loves the 52s and won't shoot the 53s for anything and another AR that is the exact opposite. Crazy that one grain (and the shape of the base) can make such a difference.

jcwit
November 11, 2009, 07:48 PM
Funny. I have one AR that loves the 52s and won't shoot the 53s for anything and another AR that is the exact opposite. Crazy that one grain (and the shape of the base) can make such a difference.

Well a tenth of a grain of powder makes a difference too. I don't shoot mine in am AR, I'm using a Rem. 700 VLS with bench rest. Overall hole size on one of my recent 5 round groups is .365, at 100 yds, this is shot for group not for score. Shooting for group is the easier of the two.

kelbro
November 11, 2009, 10:38 PM
And to add to the confusion, I have one 223AI that shoots both of them into tiny groups with the same load.

ArchAngelCD
November 12, 2009, 03:40 PM
I have found for me, the flat base 53 grain is more accurate.Byron
That may be true for shorter distances but I've found the BT bullet performs better at longer distances. (especially from a bolt action .223 rifle)

jcwit
November 12, 2009, 03:50 PM
That may be true for shorter distances but I've found the BT bullet performs better at longer distances. (especially from a bolt action .223 rifle)


What is considered a "longer" distance?

NCsmitty
November 12, 2009, 04:31 PM
You'll find that many of the older 22 centerfire rifles, possessing 1in14 twist barrels, thrive on the flat based "match" bullets in the 52-53gr range.
I've found that many of the "forgotten" flat base bullets of years past, work very well in AR style fast twist barrels. Usually with better accuracy than the bulk FMJ BT bullets offered today.
Companies like Midway and Midsouth offer their bulk SP flat base bullets at substantial savings, and can give great accuracy being unbranded brand name bullets in a generic box.


NCsmitty

ArchAngelCD
November 13, 2009, 01:01 AM
What is considered a "longer" distance?
I'm glad you noticed I said longer distances, not long distance. I usually change over to a BT bullet if the Chucks are going to be 400 meters or more out. I highly doubt you will see any difference at closer ranges. Even 400 meters might be too close to see a difference but you have to draw the line somewhere... ;)

BTE, my Howa rifle has a 1/12" twist so I rarely use a bullet over 55gr even though it could probably stabilize most 60/62gr bullets too. (unless they are very long bullets)

joed
November 14, 2009, 10:53 PM
Some guns shoot a flat base bullet more accurately then a boat tail. To be honest most of my guns fit into this category. If you're talking long distance that's where the BT shines. For 100 to 200 yards I prefer flat base bullets, beyond that and it's a BT for me.

The 52 and 53 gr bullets were the first match bullets in .224 cal. They have been around for many years for use in rifles with a 1:12" twist (before the advent of the 1:7" twist of modern .224 guns).

Byron
November 14, 2009, 11:01 PM
As I age, I find 200 yards to be longer distances now. My rifle is a Remington 700 in 222 with a 1 in 14 twist. Some years back(note I say some years), I fired a very good group at close to 350 yards with a 223 1 in 9 twist using 55 grain ballistic tips which do not group well in my 222. The VA is getting me new glasses, so maybe the distance can stretch. Byron

Sunray
November 15, 2009, 01:10 AM
"...Crazy that one grain (and the shape of the base) can make such a difference..." The shape of the base is more important at longer ranges.

MichaelK
November 15, 2009, 07:17 PM
Which one must have been what Speer and Hornady broke up over.

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