Rifle Cleaning procedure


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Ron Go
November 11, 2009, 12:55 PM
Hi All,

I just bought a new Remington 700 XCR in 30:06. I have been doing some internet research on cleaning before I fire my first round. There doesnít seem to be any consistency and everyone has a different opinion.

Cleaning Direction:
I have read that the cleaning should take place in one direction only (breech to muzzle) and then I have seen other experts say both directions with 5-10 passes with a brass brush.

Solvent:
Again I could not find consistency on choice of solvent(s) but I did buy Hoppes #9. In doing research this appears to be a powder solvent and wonít do much for metal (lead or copper) fouling but maybe a little bit only. I have read good reports on Shooters choice but want to see what the group recommends.

Breaking in:
I read reports that say breaking in is hogwash and is basically to get people to clean their barrels more often to shorten the life of the barrel (Gale McMillan) and then others swear by it.

I have held off shooting my rifle yet as I donít want to do anything to harm it. So far I have ordered a Lucas bore cleaning guide and a Dewey nylon coated rod (0.27 and up size) as there seems to be consistency these are great tools. I have my hopes #9 but think I need a metal solvent. I also have Rem Oil for post cleaning.

Any suggestions are welcome.

Thanks and best regards,

Ron

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rcmodel
November 11, 2009, 02:17 PM
Clean the factory packing oil out of it and go shoot it.

Hoppies #9 is fine for normal cleaning.

But eventually you may want some dedicated Copper Solvent to remove jacket fouling occasionally.

It is not good stuff for normal everyday bore cleaning though.

rc

hometheaterman
November 11, 2009, 02:56 PM
I like Wipe Out brush less bore cleaner. Seems to work well. I use that at times and use Hoppes 9 at other times.

dubbleA
November 11, 2009, 03:19 PM
On a factory barrel i will give it a treatment of JB's bore paste to help remove any course imperfections and then shoot till the accuracy falls off. I will then use wipe out or some other copper remover and will remove some but not all copper fouling. This is done sparingly, I come from the camp of less is more and more harm is done by over doing it. I spend a great deal of my time shooting and know most of my firearms well enough to notice a fall off in accuracy. That's just me, your milage will vary.

SlamFire1
November 11, 2009, 03:41 PM
Cleaning Direction:
I have read that the cleaning should take place in one direction only (breech to muzzle) and then I have seen other experts say both directions with 5-10 passes with a brass brush.

I have friends who believe this rubbish. It is something that they heard, think it is true, but in the final analysis, it is rubbish.

I do believe that you should push the brass brush all the way through before reversing direction. Bending the bristles in the opposite direction is hard on the brush.

Within a couple of strokes you can feel the brushing resistance drop. That is probably the minimum number of passes, but it is a lot easier to count to ten and not fret about the small stuff.

Solvent:
Again I could not find consistency on choice of solvent(s) but I did buy Hoppes #9. In doing research this appears to be a powder solvent and won’t do much for metal (lead or copper) fouling but maybe a little bit only. I have read good reports on Shooters choice but want to see what the group recommends.

I have a couple of gallons of GI bore cleaner left. GI bore cleaner is only a powder solvent . It does not dissolve brass bristle brushes. If I feel like removing copper fouling, I use Sweets or Butch’s. Both of those are very aggressive copper solvents.

But I seldom bother removing copper fouling.

I know target shooters who clean their barrels once per season. (30 caliber shooters). They shoot very well which makes me wonder if this cleaning obsession is advertising induced behavior.

I do know that a clean rifle barrel will shoot to an entirely different point of aim for up to five shots.

Last across the course match in October, I was shooting AA2520 in my .223 out to 300 yards. AA2520 leaves a lot of fouling and I have had settling issues when I switch to a stick powder at 600 yards. So, I thought I would be clever. I bristle brushed the barrel after 300 rapid. I put on my old dope at six, dialed in the wind, and the first shot was wild. I made a full course correction and the second shot was just as wild. Now I was really worried as I was out of sighters. I made some more changes, prayed to the range gods, and first shot for record was an X. Had a very decent X count of 10, so maybe a clean barrel ain’t all bad, but if the first shot for record had been an eight, it would have been all bad.

Breaking in:
I read reports that say breaking in is hogwash and is basically to get people to clean their barrels more often to shorten the life of the barrel (Gale McMillan) and then others swear by it.
I think this is rubbish for nice smooth match barrels. However there may be something to it with rough military barrels. A bud of mine has a bore scope and he fitted a new WWII era M1903 barrel to a 03 receiver. He said first shot all the pores of the barrel filled with copper. He cleaned that out and second shot left less copper. After cleaning the third shot left even less. Three cleanings were all he had time for.

For a hunting rifle, you will not shoot it enough to shoot out a barrel, so break in won’t hurt a thing. I really doubt it will do anything either.

But doing the rain dance around the bench might help matters, and you will get good exercise.

Ron Go
November 11, 2009, 04:10 PM
Hi Guys,

Thanks very much for the responses. Very helpful and I appreciate the experience in the comments.

I will be using the rifle for hunting but off season will be spending time at the range. I ordered 2 boxes of Federal GMM 168 HPBT and am waiting for those to arrive to signt in the new Leupold VX3 scope combo. It will take a while to get them as the demand is high in the current environment. I hear Federal has 3 factories just pumping out .223.

I want to get into reloading as my father did this and I know his favorite load for deer was nosler ballistic tip, 165 gr, IMR 4350 at 57 gr powder, CCI primers and Remington brass. I will probably give that a try once I see how well the gun can shoot the Federal GMM. If anyone has any comments on great loads knowing that it will vary from gun to gun I would be interested to hear so I can include that in my research.

Thanks again,

Ron

Al Thompson
November 11, 2009, 04:56 PM
Ron, IMHO the posters above are correct. I like the Hoppes to clean out the powder residue, then Wipe Out to get the copper out. For a factory barrel, I'm pretty aggressive in the first few cleanings as they tend to be rough. :)

As for reloading for accuracy, IMHO, the key is getting a good bullet at the proper distance from the rifling. Some rifles like it close, some not so close. You have to experiment a bit. There's lots more to it than that, but your reloading manual should have some good reading. I greatly favor using a reloading manual by the company who makes the bullets, I.E., Nosler manual for Nosler bullets, Sierra for Sierra, etc.

proplinker
November 12, 2009, 12:19 AM
With all the information on cleaning......all I can add is they are all right!

Ed Ames
November 12, 2009, 12:50 AM
I'll add something:

Most of the concern with cleaning comes from using relatively hard metal cleaning rods (especially military steel rods) and messing up the rifle crown (muzzle shape), degrading accuracy. One way to avoid that problem is to use boresnakes or pull cable cleaning systems for routine cleanings. A side benefit is that they are easier to pack with your rifle and have with you when hunting. They ain't so hot for really scrubbiing the bore e.g. to remove metal fouling, but w/ a new sporting 30-06 that's unlikely to be a huge issue..

nyresq
November 12, 2009, 02:09 AM
I am big fan of foaming bore cleaners... fill the bore and let it sit for 20 mins, run a couple patches through and repeat one more time. This will get out 99.9% or eveything including copper if you use a copper disolving foam and for all but the most die hard benchrest rifles, it will sufice.I've found only the most grungy barrels even need a brush a couple times between the foam treatments to get the hardest crap out.

I have done it with foam cleaners and done it with hoppes and M-pro and bore shine and several others over the years and the foam gets it just as clean with 1/10th the work.

USSR
November 12, 2009, 12:25 PM
Quote:
Breaking in:
I read reports that say breaking in is hogwash and is basically to get people to clean their barrels more often to shorten the life of the barrel (Gale McMillan) and then others swear by it.

I think this is rubbish for nice smooth match barrels. However there may be something to it with rough military barrels. A bud of mine has a bore scope and he fitted a new WWII era M1903 barrel to a 03 receiver. He said first shot all the pores of the barrel filled with copper. He cleaned that out and second shot left less copper. After cleaning the third shot left even less. Three cleanings were all he had time for.


What most people don't understand is, the part of a new barrel that causes copper to be distributed in the barrel is the leade (throat). It is the only part of the barrel that cannot be lapped by the barrelmaker, and is the part of the barrel that is being dealt with during break-in. So, whether you have a fine, custom made, hand lapped Krieger barrel or a standard factory barrel that hasn't been lapped at all, you are trying to smooth out the leade and not the rifling itself.

Don

Ron Go
November 12, 2009, 01:08 PM
I am not as experienced as many but I don't know if I like the idea of putting an abrasive material all the way through the bore. That seems like it would try and solve one problem while causing another - meaning - the abrasive wouldn't discriminate between the bad imperfections and the good rifling it should leave alone.

If the throat (leade) area is the usual culprit, is there any way to clean the throat area only or is that impractical?

I might have to find someone with a bore cam to video it and see what I am dealing with.

Nice time I will get a hand lapped custom barrel but for now I have the factory one.

Fremmer
November 12, 2009, 02:20 PM
Look, you bought a new Remington. Although it's not a custom barrel, Remington makes a pretty good barrel on all of its rifles.

Get a good rifle rest, several different types and weights of ammo, and see how she shoots before you do anything else. If you can find the right ammo that the rifle likes, I'll bet you won't need to mess with the throat, barrel, cameras, or anything else. My stock Remingon 700 barrel shoots sub-MOA with Federal ammo. :cool:

After you shoot that gun, swab the barrel with patch-soaked Hoppes No. 9 several times. Then finish with a patch with some gun oil on it. It is that easy, so don't worry.

Have fun with that new rifle, dude!!! :D I'm jealous!

USSR
November 13, 2009, 10:55 AM
...I don't know if I like the idea of putting an abrasive material all the way through the bore. That seems like it would try and solve one problem while causing another - meaning - the abrasive wouldn't discriminate between the bad imperfections and the good rifling it should leave alone.


Normal break-in does not involve any abrasive material. You are simply using normal bullets, and using the bullet jacket material to "lap" the leade. The reason you clean after each shot is to remove any copper left in the leade by the previous shot, so you don't have a copper on copper situation which prevents the next bullet from fully acting on the leade.

Don

jcwit
November 13, 2009, 12:09 PM
For those wanting to know how to break in a new rifle/new barrel check out this site:

www.rifle-accuracy-reports.com/barrel-break-in.html

This is basically the same procedure as what Krieger Barrels recommends. It would seem to me that if ANYONE knew how it should be done it would be him. But then what do I know, ask him.

There you go folks!

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