"Ninja" Glock reload? How is this possible?


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gunnutery
November 17, 2009, 03:39 AM
I saw this video posted on the firearmblog.com today.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D7stLQvsDX8

How is this done? I obviously had to try it with my Glock 22 (unloaded of course) and to no surprise it didn't work. It looks like he's using a long slide Glock. Is it possible that the little extra weight of the slide helps this reload, or has he modified the recoil spring? Wouldn't the added force of the rounds in the magazine only hinder the slide from being moved in this way?

I'm only curious and don't plan on employing this technique (even if I got it to work). Any thoughts?

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Justin
November 17, 2009, 03:48 AM
That video's been making the rounds. Suffice it to say, lots of practice and a decent helping of fast-twitch muscle.

As I understand it, that particular competitor is also a martial arts enthusiast as well as an IPSC shooter.

Vikingsoftpaw
November 17, 2009, 03:49 AM
I think he racked the slide by catching it on his shirt. Obviously not using factory springs.

Justin
November 17, 2009, 03:55 AM
Unlikely.

Also, there is a long discussion thread about that video over at the Brian Enos forums. (http://www.brianenos.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=92119)

General Geoff
November 17, 2009, 04:06 AM
This guy deserves the title of Grammaton Cleric for that. :D

scythefwd
November 17, 2009, 04:20 AM
Vikingsoftpaw - It can be done, but it ain't easy. I can get a bout 1/2 inch movement on my 9mm, with the hammer already back. I would love to meet him and have him do it with hammer down on mine, it's got a heavy hammer :). I just need to work on getting it stopped better.

What is the factory spring on a glock?

badbadtz560
November 17, 2009, 12:41 PM
does it have anything to do w/ the strap across his shoulder?

edit* wait nevermind.. that's just a wrinkle lol

Zach S
November 17, 2009, 01:12 PM
Since seeing that video I have tried and failed many times...

seeds76
November 17, 2009, 02:24 PM
I hear this is the original guy with the "ninja" load. It's more clear to see this example.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IqyxP3_am3g&feature=related

NMGonzo
November 17, 2009, 02:32 PM
Grammaton Cleric

We watched the same movie :D

nwilliams
November 17, 2009, 04:55 PM
Every time I see people do this I am amazed.

The closest I can get is with my 92FS so long as the hammer is back I can get the slide to move a little, no where close to being able to chamber a round however.

9mmepiphany
November 17, 2009, 05:41 PM
i understand the physics of it, but i don't have my 9mm Glock to try it with...lent it to the BIL

the hard part is stopping it without "give"...so that the slide continues rearward while you drive the frame back forward. i'll have to discuss it with my Tai Chi instructor...it looks a lot like the reverse technique of Bruce Lee's famous 1" punch

bang_bang
November 17, 2009, 05:45 PM
Since seeing that video I have tried and failed many times...

Lmao...I caught myself shaking the hell out of my 1911 for like 5 minutes after watching this.

Walkalong
November 17, 2009, 07:17 PM
a decent helping of fast-twitch muscle.A way above average helping. I bet I could have done that in my youth, but I have slowed down considerably. It would still be fun to try.

AJChenMPH
November 17, 2009, 07:30 PM
Arrrrgh...time to work out and start taking nutritional supplements. :)

benzy2
November 17, 2009, 07:51 PM
I thought someone earlier was claiming the pistol was using factory springs that were very worn. That on top of practice and proper "form" make this not quite impossible though still very rare. I thought in one of the earlier threads on this video it was stated that the spring shot count made a huge difference (something along the 50,000 shot line IIRC). Impressive none the less.

Lonestar49
November 17, 2009, 08:06 PM
...

Well, he certainly has the one-hand-only method down..

Kudos,


Ls

jr_roosa
November 17, 2009, 11:23 PM
I SEE HOW HE DID IT!

It's not the push forward that does it. He pulls back quickly and then his hand stops with the elbow fully flexed and the slide continues backwards. He's basically slamming his wrist against his bicep with enough force that the slide cycles.

Ouch.

-J.

Isher
November 17, 2009, 11:41 PM
Despite the smithing and technique that made this possible,

The most telling moment for me

Was the combination of the the two magic advertising power words

Ninja and Glock.

Get out the 'plates and the duct tape............

And for this exercise, you don't even need the word "Mall."

isher

Dannix
November 18, 2009, 12:40 AM
^ when I first saw the title of this thread, my first thought was this subforum must be a mall ninja hangout. :D

I lack the "twitch" to even try this. I'm just glad I live in the era of the peacemaker, and I don't have to rely on mauy kung karate thai for defense. :)

janobles14
November 18, 2009, 12:43 AM
LMAO! not much secret ninja stuff to it! hes using a race gun. they have ultra light springs in them. one of the officers here shoots one at competitions. he also uses it in womens handgun courses to show limpwristing. he often shoots it upside down and limp to show how people make standard weapons jam.

Skillet
November 18, 2009, 12:51 AM
how?
how did they...?
hmmm...
you could most definately NOT do that with my CZ 75B.
or any 1911.
and you would have to have great aim to get that mag in the mag well.
i can't see much video trickery if any at all, and I am experienced in that field.
What did they use for the spring? a slinky?

the guys on that other site said that it is a stock spring and the backing of the slide is caused by the inertia of the movement "he pulls the gun back into him stopping it dead solid and initiating a slight jolt forward to rack the slide."-from the guy on the other site.
also, "Stopping the gun dead solid after the rearward movement is key. Its a huge timing thing."
looks like it's one of those quick movements that requires alot of timed muscle coordination and muscle memory. kinda like those funky frisbee throws that you see those college guys do.

bang_bang
November 18, 2009, 12:58 AM
you could most definately NOT do that with my CZ 75B.
or any 1911.

That's basically my set up...

I didn't even attempt the Witness (CZ clone). The 1911 slide moved just a little bit, not enough to chamber a round though.

PO2Hammer
November 18, 2009, 01:38 AM
It looks like he's using a long slide Glock. Is it possible that the little extra weight of the slide helps this reload, or has he modified the recoil spring?
I think both. You can get a Glock to function with a recoil spring as low as 10 or 11 pounds. The striker spring has to be reduced too, so the trigger doesn't pull the slide out of battery.
The guy is good any way you slice it.

General Geoff
November 18, 2009, 05:56 AM
LMAO! not much secret ninja stuff to it! hes using a race gun.

According to the linked thread, the guy in the video can do it with any pistol you hand him, including a 1911 with the hammer down.

w_houle
November 18, 2009, 07:17 AM
Okay, so I did it:neener: I do feel as though I cheated by using my Hi Point:barf: but it is Gloc...Ok, I can't do it:evil: I can't help it, it's like mall ninja Tourette's:eek:

strambo
November 18, 2009, 07:58 AM
I didn't see anyone put 2 mags on the floor, do a front handspring loading 2 pistols, then "ninja" chamber ea. as they complete the handspring, "dual wielding" on some Zombies. yawn

Blakenzy
November 18, 2009, 08:25 AM
Perhaps he can pull bullets from their cases with the flick of a wrist.....

9mmepiphany
November 18, 2009, 12:38 PM
i think i was more impressed before i went to YouTube and saw the Flippino shooter doing the same thing

raz-0
November 18, 2009, 06:50 PM
LMAO! not much secret ninja stuff to it! hes using a race gun. they have ultra light springs in them. one of the officers here shoots one at competitions. he also uses it in womens handgun courses to show limpwristing. he often shoots it upside down and limp to show how people make standard weapons jam.

The guy in the original video is using a stock weight spring (besides, from the mag, he is obviously shooting limited, which means he is shooting major power factor, which in a glock means you probably are running stock weight springs). From what folks who shoot with him have said, he can also do the same trick with some guns that are not striker fired. It's hit and miss depending on how the gun is built (slide frame fit, how the hammer hits the slide, mainspring weight, mass of slide, recoil spring weight, etc.).

The dude obviously trains a lot, and he practiced. I don't practice, and I'm not oozing with upper body strength naturally, and with my M&P using a 15lb spring (stock weight, not stock spring setup), I can occasionally get it to lock back on an empty mag but not to strip a dummy round.

It's just a matter of accelerating quick and changing directions quick. Inertia takes care of the rest. You just need to be in decent condition and practice. It's not where my training time is best spent for improvement, so I don't practice it, but I have no doubt that you can do it with most striker fired guns with stock spring weights.

panoz77
November 18, 2009, 07:05 PM
You can also do this with a Hipoint C9

newgunmike
November 18, 2009, 07:41 PM
yeah i did it with my c9, would it be harder with a glock?

scarredpelt
November 19, 2009, 07:18 AM
I will tell you that I have a severe case of inflammation from trying with my 23. Manually cycling the slide takes just 'so much' effort that I discounted that such a feat could be completed without 'finagling'. But I put an empty mag in the firearm and then slammed it on the side of the bed mattress and succeeded in locking the slide. So I have to concede that a person of sufficient physical ability could complete such a fantastic feat with stock springs installed.

Marty183
November 20, 2009, 12:18 AM
I've never reloaded with one hand but I have charged my G22 using the rear site and the heel of my boot as well as my belt. At separate times of course...

David E
November 20, 2009, 02:39 AM
It looks like he's using a long slide Glock. Is it possible that the little extra weight of the slide helps this reload....

The slide on the 17 and 34 weigh the same. That's what the cut out atop the slide accomplishes.

It may be a cool trick, but the proper techniques are faster and more reliable.

gtmtnbiker98
November 20, 2009, 01:45 PM
He's a USPSA Grand Master shooter and his reload techniques have been discussed quite heavily over at Brian Enos' forums.

HardShell
November 20, 2009, 01:51 PM
This guy deserves the title of Grammaton Cleric for that. :D

http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y12/HardShell/RWB%20-%20Jokes%20and%20Icons/Gunkata.gif

David E
November 20, 2009, 02:22 PM
If I were designing the stage, I'd mandate (as most stages do) that the magazine must be FLAT on the table, not standing on end as shown in at least one of the clips.

Then he has no choice but to use both hands to load the gun. (or take a long time with one hand)

zignal_zero
November 21, 2009, 08:15 AM
his pimp hand is strong :) i wanna c him smack somebody lol

Patrice
November 21, 2009, 09:35 AM
My spouse demonstrated the technique for me, with stock weapons(i.e., no "special smithing"). No tricks, no magic, no extraordinary feats of strength...just the laws of nature. I will admit that university physics were tough courses for me, but even I understand the basics.--Patrice:rolleyes:

Z-Michigan
November 21, 2009, 10:36 AM
I've tried this with an M&P9c and a G22. I can get the slide to move about 1" rearward on the G22 and maybe 1/2" on the M&P9c. I can believe that someone who's strong and practices a lot can do it as shown in the video, even with stock springs. With extra light springs it would be easy.

No real practical application that I can see. I'll bet it starts showing up in movies though.

30-30shooter
August 2, 2011, 01:52 PM
can anyone tell me what he does, it looks almost like he cocks the gun under his armpit. has anyone else tried this?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IqyxP3_am3g&feature=related

colt1911fan
August 2, 2011, 02:07 PM
It looks like the same concept as driving in reverse with your tail gate open and abruptly stopping causing what ever is in the bed of your truck to fly out. But that's just me I'm probably wrong.

M-Cameron
August 2, 2011, 02:12 PM
if i recall correctly......the theory behind the "ninja" style reload....is that you use the inertia of the moving slide and allow it to cock its self.

i dont know if thats really how its done.....or if there is some slight of hand going on......but it looks cool and is sure to impress either way.

303tom
August 2, 2011, 02:19 PM
Yep , same way we used to empty the trash out of the pickup at the dump !

Red Cent
August 2, 2011, 02:30 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D7stLQvsDX8&feature=related

browneu
August 2, 2011, 02:34 PM
I was impressed.

Sent from my LG-P999 using Tapatalk

oldbear
August 2, 2011, 02:42 PM
if i recall correctly......the theory behind the "ninja" style reload

Or called the inertia rack. I'm not sure I would want to count on that for a combat reload if I had both hands free, but it looks great.

JoeMal
August 2, 2011, 02:53 PM
I have tried this and the only thing I was successful at was throwing out my arm and looking like an idiot for 10 minutes

tbutera2112
August 2, 2011, 02:55 PM
tried this one day with my subcompact, and theres no way its happening....the people who do this have to have fullsize guns with a light recoil spring

gym
August 2, 2011, 02:59 PM
It's either a trick or hes catching the side of his body with the slide. You aren't going to get a stock glock to bring back the slide like that. Also may be time lapse photography. Show the empty gun, cut, load a round, and splice it together with an editing program.

Red Cent
August 2, 2011, 03:07 PM
Inertia and light springs for competition. No tricks otherwise.

Sam1911
August 2, 2011, 03:27 PM
(Merged.)

SharpsDressedMan
August 2, 2011, 04:02 PM
Alas, even Eric Clapton went "slow hand" in his later years....................

Drail
August 2, 2011, 04:04 PM
Bruce Lee could deliver a punch with one hand that measured 250 ft. lbs. in a total distance of one inch. Study martial arts and see what is really possible. It's not a parlor trick. I lived in Korea for a while and I saw plenty of things that seemed "impossible".

voyager4520
August 2, 2011, 05:33 PM
Super light recoil spring I'd bet.

Apocalypse-Now
August 2, 2011, 07:05 PM
double post.

Apocalypse-Now
August 2, 2011, 07:06 PM
How is this done?

simple.


very weak recoil spring, fast flick of the wrist, and a lot of stupidity. there's a few vids of mall ninjas doing this.

mrvco
August 2, 2011, 07:54 PM
I hear this is the original guy with the "ninja" load. It's more clear to see this example.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IqyxP3_am3g&feature=related


Wow, I thought he shot himself in the leg when he holstered his Glock :what:

KAS1981
August 2, 2011, 09:03 PM
This will be all over the movies soon.

Strahley
August 2, 2011, 09:24 PM
Seems about as useful as being able to chamber a round using only your tongue and left foot

bergmen
August 2, 2011, 09:33 PM
I hear this is the original guy with the "ninja" load. It's more clear to see this example.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IqyxP3_am3g&feature=related

When I first watched this I thought he had an ND when he holstered but realized later that it was a shot by somebody else on the range.

Dan

shockwave
August 2, 2011, 09:37 PM
Is he snagging the rear sight on his shirt?

Walt Sherrill
August 2, 2011, 09:41 PM
I'd think that Glock has got to have a lighter-than-normal recoil spring, for the slide to move that easily. (It may not be THAT easy, but it still moves far more easily than any stock Glock I've owned or handled.)

And, the slide doesn't lock back, as you'd expect it to, when the slide goes to the rear (or it does, and he hits the slide release as part of his "Ninja" routine.)


.

TenMillimaster
August 2, 2011, 10:50 PM
It looks like the same concept as driving in reverse with your tail gate open and abruptly stopping causing what ever is in the bed of your truck to fly out. But that's just me I'm probably wrong.


It's just an application of momentum.
(mass of slide+mass of frame)velocity backward = (mass of slide)velocity of the slide cocking movement -(mass of frame)Velocity forwards.

A little math rearrangement: V_slide initial -(mass of frame/mass of slide){(V_slide initial) - (V_frame final)}=V_slide final
This tells me that a heavier frame makes cocking the weapon like this difficult, and a heavier slide makes cocking the weapon easier (which I think explains why it's easy to do on Hipoints, super heavy slide because it's just a lot of mass delaying the blowback).

Whether or not the slide opens is a question of forces, not momentum... if the derivative of the equation (or better yet, a rearranged version of it) above is taken with respect to time (velocity is meters per second, and the derivative of that is acceleration... so F=ma.

Umm... my minimal physics knowledge doesn't tell me where to go from here.
Is it this force being greater than spring force+friction that cocks the gun?
or when sufficient work is done by this force to equal the work required to cock the gun, counteract friction and work done by the spring force...

ANYWAYS; simple test to see if my ideas hold true: anyone want to clamp something rather heavy on their glock and see if this makes inertia cocking easier?

chrome_austex
August 2, 2011, 11:43 PM
Pretty cool trick. On the first try I cocked the striker on my P99, not nearly enough to load it, and not easily repeated, esp with a fully loaded mag.

As a martial artist, I can apreciate a good demo, light springs(probably) or not. You'd be suprised what you can pull off with enough practice. Crossover skills help too.

It's just a matter of accelerating quick and changing directions quick. Inertia takes care of the rest. You just need to be in decent condition and practice. It's not where my training time is best spent for improvement, so I don't practice it, but I have no doubt that you can do it with most striker fired guns with stock spring weights.

9mmepiphany
August 3, 2011, 12:27 AM
The first time I saw this was a Youtube clip from a USPSA match...the use was the shooter started had to pickup an unloaded gun off the table and load it before starting the course, while the other hand was occupied holding a brief case. He later produced a Youtube clip showing him doing the load with a number of different Glocks.

The trick isn't the ability to get the slide moving to the rear quickly enough. It is to be able to stop the rearward movement of your forearm suddenly to allow the slide to continue moving to the rear to the end of it's travel....while you are driving the frame back forward.

And, the slide doesn't lock back, as you'd expect it to, when the slide goes to the rear (or it does, and he hits the slide release as part of his "Ninja" routine.)
Why would you expect the slide to lock to the rear?

There is a loaded magazine in the gun, the object is to chamber a round with one hand

Yondering
August 3, 2011, 05:03 AM
Sorry if this link has already been posted...
How to Perform a One Handed Load by Rob Romero (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fKyGUYjCruY)

Six
August 3, 2011, 10:32 AM
Re: "It's a light spring"

Read the thread and the hundreds like it. It's been done with a stock spring, stock gun, no tricks.

If you're of the brave type, try it with your gun, but instead of stopping your arm yourself, slam the distal end of your tricep into a wall behind you. I've racked a stock Glock 19 and a stock M&P this way to prove to myself that it's possible.

Now imagine that instead of a wall you have years of martial arts training as well as an generous amount of fast twitch muscle fibers, and you can see that no trickery is needed.

Sam1911
August 3, 2011, 10:39 AM
Now imagine that instead of a wall you have years of martial arts training as well as an generous amount of fast twitch muscle fibers, and you can see that no trickery is needed.

Actually, I think a little bolding might be appropriate here because we have the answer very clearly explained already: How to Perform a One Handed Load by Rob Romero (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fKyGUYjCruY)

WATCH THE VIDEO. HE DOES IT WITH MULTIPLE GUNS AND EXPLAINS EXACTLY HOW TO DO IT.

Instead of a wall, he's using the limit of his arm's natural range of motion to provide the "hard stop" he needs to change direction.

And, in his words, "More of a gimmick, than a technique."

txgunsuscg
August 3, 2011, 08:01 PM
I'm just amazed that three other people know what a Cleric is....

Oh, and the trick with the slide was cool too.....

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