Reloading tables...can I use any bullet style within that specific weight or not??


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saturno_v
November 20, 2009, 12:17 PM
The reloading data tables usually mention the specific bullet style used with the various powder charges....when I try one particular load for a given bullet weight where they mention, for example, a Hornady 180 gr. round nose, can I use instead another type of bullet, let's say a Sierra Matchking 180 gr.??

I know I may have accuracy issues, but from a pressure safety standpoint, can the bullet type be different (the bearing surface could be different) within that specific weight for a given load??

For some cartridges where I can use lead (hard cast or not) bullets, can I switch, let's say, for a particular load, a lead bullet for a jacketed one without issues??

Thanks!


Regards

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MT GUNNY
November 20, 2009, 01:23 PM
Thats a good ? On my speer manual, Has a set of 30 different powder loads with 3 different styles of Bullets all same grain. Each set of load data is a min to max of powder. So my answer is "Yes" as long as the bullet is the proper Grain for the load data!

If you are going to Lead from a jacketed bullet, vis versa, I say NO. there is Different load data for Lead WadCutters

kanook
November 20, 2009, 01:46 PM
DO NOT change a jacketed bullet for a lead bullet load or versa visa. They are a different material and have a different resistance. 158 lrn is fine with swc but NOT WITH jacketed anything.

Art Eatman
November 20, 2009, 02:01 PM
Staying with jacketed bullets, lead core: The only time I ran into a problem was with Winchester "Fail Safe" bullets. They apparently have a harder jacket, and I did have some pressure signs.

For the usual suspects, however, I've never found any difference. For example, I've used the same '06 powder load for Remington Bronze Points, Sierra flat-base and boat-tail, and Hornady Spire Points. All 150-grain. All grouped about the same and killed Bambi.

Pretty much the same pattern in .223, .220 Swift and .243 loadings that I've done. Bullet weight is the main criterion.

I guess I'd for-sure start with 5%-under loads and work up with these premium 30-caliber bullets, just because they're new to me and I don't know the comparative hardness.

R.W.Dale
November 20, 2009, 02:13 PM
Staying with jacketed bullets, lead core: The only time I ran into a problem was with Winchester "Fail Safe" bullets. They apparently have a harder jacket, and I did have some pressure signs.

I may be mistaken but isn't the "fail safe" a 100% copper bullet. If so that would certainly change the friction and thus pressure characteristics.

But I do agree 100% with your assessment that bullets made from the same materials at the same weight can share data barring rifling engagement issues.

saturno_v
November 20, 2009, 03:12 PM
Interesting point about solid bullets....so if I want to use, let's say, the Barnes solids, I cannot use the same loading data for regular jacketed bullets??

At this point I have to evaluate the hardness of the lead core too between jacketed bullets from different brands??

dmazur
November 20, 2009, 04:47 PM
My understanding is that it is the contact area and hardness of the outside metal that determines how much pressure is created behind it. Thus, Barnes all-copper bullets have a certain amount of drag, lead bullets a different amount, jacketed bullets something else, etc.

Hornady is pushing their GMX bullets, which are solid gilding metal. While they are a little longer than their jacketed counterparts, the BC is the same. So, for the same caliber, Hornady says the ballistics are the same as their SST's.

Plated bullets are not jacketed bullets. Quite a bit of disagreement as to how to load for them. I've read to treat them same as jacketed, and other places say same as lead. I believe the plated bullets that have been "shown to a copper bath" are so thin they are the same as lead, except for lead fumes in inside shooting areas, while the more heavily plated bullets might be treated as jacketed.

R.W.Dale
November 20, 2009, 04:55 PM
Interesting point about solid bullets....so if I want to use, let's say, the Barnes solids, I cannot use the same loading data for regular jacketed bullets??

At this point I have to evaluate the hardness of the lead core too between jacketed bullets from different brands??

I'm not saying the data may or may not be different. But nor would I grab the speer manual to come up with loads for a 150grn TSX 30-06 either without finding out what barnes has to say first and foremost

Atroxus
November 20, 2009, 05:03 PM
I am a new reloader so take what I say with that in mind. But the impression I have from reading ABCs of reloading is that it is not a good idea to use same load data because different hardness of material, and difference in bearing surfaces can cause pressures to be very different. So personally I would look for new load data when switching from lead to jacketed.

Vern Humphrey
November 20, 2009, 05:37 PM
Staying with jacketed bullets, lead core: The only time I ran into a problem was with Winchester "Fail Safe" bullets. They apparently have a harder jacket, and I did have some pressure signs.
When loading for Bigfoot Wallace, my .35 Brown-Whelen, a load that is perfectly fine with Sierra Game Kings will back out primers with Nosler Partition Jackets.

Now this is a wildcat cartridge. There is no standard SAAMI chamber and no laboratory-tested loads for this cartridge. Pressure signs are all I have to go by when developing loads.

45crittergitter
December 9, 2009, 09:42 PM
It is possible to get into trouble by swapping same-weight bullets without adjusting the powder charge. I recently read of an occasion where simply substituting a different jacket/construction type bullet of the same weight resulted in a laboratory-measured pressure increase of some 20,000 psi. I wouldn't work up a max load and then swap bullets.

nastynatesfish
December 9, 2009, 10:34 PM
first with the same grain bullets juat watch out for say the sst hornadys with there long ogive compared to the roundnose you may be getting into comprissing your load so you'll have to adjust your seating depth. as far as the barnes go if you are using the smooth or X bullets you need to cut your charge about 10 percent. the bullets with rings in them don't need any adjustment...say the tripple shocks. if all else fails you can call barnes 800 number and one of there techs will give you load data for what ever powder and grain bullet your using

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