Is 3 in oil any good for firearms?


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hometheaterman
November 20, 2009, 10:30 PM
So a buddy and I were hunting when it started raining. Both guns got decently wet by the end of the day. We of course wiped them off and oiled them. However, he only had and always uses 3 in 1 oil on his guns. I've been using Remington Oil on mine prior to this. Is the 3 in 1 oil fine to use or should I use Remington oil too?

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THE DARK KNIGHT
November 20, 2009, 10:31 PM
3 in 1 will run most guns just fine, but if you have remington oil, break free clp, etc. i'd just use a product like that over 3 in 1.

hometheaterman
November 20, 2009, 10:54 PM
I didn't clean inside the gun or anything with it I just wiped down the outside as that's all that got wet to my knowledge unless some somehow made it down the barrel when I was carrying it. Anyway, so should this be fine until my next cleaning which will probably be in a week or two? I don't have the Remington Oil with me so would have to go buy some if I used it now. I used to clean my gun fully after every hunt but I realized it's no point in me cleaning it 2-3 times a week so I'm going to try and just clean it 2 or 3 times during the whole hunting season. Or is that a horrible idea?

Avenger29
November 20, 2009, 10:54 PM
I'd actually pick up something better than Remoil.

3 in 1 oil will do the job, but almost anything else is better. It is an "if it's all you got, by all means run it until you can get something better" kind of deal.

I don't forsee any problem in not doing a full cleaning after every hunting trip, but you do need to keep everything wiped down/lubed and make sure you aren't caking dirt in places and whatnot. Cleaning the bore is not strictly necessary, but you may want to run an oiled patch or boresnake down it for extra insurance.

wally
November 21, 2009, 08:53 AM
Anything is better than nothing initially, but for actual rust prevention in storage CLP is hard to beat, especially if you factor in price.

My grandfather used 3in1 oil on everything and just about everything had surface rust. He never cared about the cosmetics as long as it worked.

--wally.

SlamFire1
November 21, 2009, 09:29 AM
I conducted a rust test of nails in seawater. The nail coated in 3 in 1 oil rusted faster than the uncoated nail.

3 in 1 oil is just an oil that comes in a shiny can with a blaring label. You donít know what tests the oil will pass, you donít know what is in the oil. As far as we know it could be straight mineral oil. No additives.

The first choice on oils are oils that have to meet a specification. The military buys oils through specifications and the vendor is at risk if the product does not meet the specification. These oils are the first choice. The second choice are oils that have to meet industry specifications. Industry specifications are totally voluntary. No one inspects compliance and there is little to no liability to the manufacturer if the product does not meet the spec. However putting a substandard product out will alienate customers, so there is an incentive to keep to spec. The last choice are cans with blaring labels. It could be good, or it could be all label and high price. You donít know.

MMCSRET
November 21, 2009, 12:43 PM
Works great to fry catfish in; kills the taste!!!!!!!!!!!

rizbunk77
November 21, 2009, 01:16 PM
In my opinion 3 in 1 oil is the best there is. I have a can of it in my garage. I believe that if I were to use it on a firearm, it would probably beat all the other products combined. I am basing this on the fact that the can has been in my garage since 1959 or thereabouts, and the inside of the can is bright and shiny. A stark contrast to the outside of the can mind you. Given that the entirety of the can has endured identical environmental conditions since the Eisenhower administration, and since the only difference benefitting the inside of the can is the presence of the oil, one can only come to a positive conclusion. No one here can say the same for CLP for example. Stick with a winner.

Carl N. Brown
November 21, 2009, 01:37 PM
"Gun oil" is supposed to be refined and long lasting, less likely to oxidize and make a varnish like some oils, or thicken into a sludge like WD-40. I distinctly remember having to detail strip an old S&W M36 Chief Special revolver and use #9 and a razor blade to shave off hard brown varnish looking gunk that was leaving the hammer in cocked position after I pulled the trigger. It had been oiled and put up for a decade.

I have used 3-in-1 on hinges, bicycle chains and so on. I use specific "gun oil" to lubricate firearms. I have even used WD40 as a gun cleaner if I can wipe the parts clean. I have used 3-in-1 or automotive oil if that's all I have. Gun oil is just less likely than the others to gum up over time.

Kimber45acp
November 21, 2009, 01:41 PM
3 in 1 oil is just an oil that comes in a shiny can with a blaring label. You don’t know what tests the oil will pass, you don’t know what is in the oil. As far as we know it could be straight mineral oil. No additives.

The last choice are cans with blaring labels. It could be good, or it could be all label and high price. You don’t know. Huh? 3 in one has the most boring label on earth and I only see it in white plastic bottles in wal mart.

In my experience, 3 in 1 oil "evaporates" just as fast as other oils. The main rule still applies: if your gun is in a moist climate, oil it at least once a month.

bkjeffrey
November 21, 2009, 01:42 PM
I used 3 in 1 oil on my AK the other day because it was all I had. We ran a case of 500 rounds thorugh the gun with 3n1 oil and it never got sludged up, never caused the weapon to fail and the gun got so hot that the edges of the wood were beginning to turn black and the 3n1 held strong. Ill use it again if I have to.

Kimber45acp
November 21, 2009, 01:50 PM
and the gun got so hot that the edges of the wood were beginning to turn blackWow, that's gun abuse. Get another AK and alternate next time.

-eaux-
November 21, 2009, 01:57 PM
personal experience: 3-in-1 and/or remoil work fine for spot lubrication, but are next to useless for rust prevention.

GRIZ22
November 21, 2009, 02:28 PM
It will work but there are many other better products out there.

mete
November 21, 2009, 03:02 PM
Last I heard 3in1 is owned by WD40, I won't use either !! I don't know about changes but 3in1 used to be the worst thing you could use in guns or anything else ! It had no anti-oxident so would quickly form a varnish that would jam a gun. I repaired many a gun that didn't work only because of the 3in1.
If you don't want to use proper gun oil then use Mobil 1 .FBI did tests with various lubes and Mobil 1 worked very well.I've used Mobil DTE which is a turbine oil and that works very well also.

DGTigers
November 21, 2009, 03:14 PM
I found this test when doing a quick search. http://www.thegunzone.com/rust.html

CLP has always worked for me so I'm not surprised that the experiment found the same result.

Kimber45acp
November 21, 2009, 06:16 PM
I don't know about changes but 3in1 used to be the worst thing you could use in guns or anything else ! It had no anti-oxident so would quickly form a varnish that would jam a gun.Woa, I'd like to hear from a second source on that. If that's true I would definitely stop using 3 in 1.

janedoedad
November 21, 2009, 06:28 PM
Works great to fry catfish in; kills the taste!!!!!!!!!!!

Ye Gods! More proof that a Snipe will eat ANYTHING!

I use 3in1 on the 1911 and it seems fine.

WD-40 is NOT a lubricant. Its job is to displace moisture it also attracts dust and other gunk.

Average Joe
November 21, 2009, 06:52 PM
I wouldn't. Guns are expensive, and I would not cheap out on a few bucks for real gun oil.

armchairQB
November 21, 2009, 06:57 PM
Pure whale oil is probably better though illegal.

Nonetheless, stick to the commercial stuff or something petroleum based.

X-Rap
November 21, 2009, 06:58 PM
WD-40 is NOT a lubricant
It says it is:scrutiny:

Erik M
November 21, 2009, 07:20 PM
Ye Gods! More proof that a Snipe will eat ANYTHING!

I use 3in1 on the 1911 and it seems fine.

WD-40 is NOT a lubricant. Its job is to displace moisture it also attracts dust and other gunk.
Snipe season is coming up isnt it, better to get some hockey sticks and trash bags to catch some with. I missed out last year.


Ive heard of several people using 3 in 1, but like most others have said - If an actual gun oil is commercially available around you stick with that.

azyogi
November 21, 2009, 07:40 PM
Among the things I have picked up through estate sales etc. is a jar marked Sperm whale oil/ turbine oil. The guy I got it from used it on his flintlocks, and wheellocks. Have used this for all my 'locker queens' for a preservitive it's great. For an Auto it tends to turn gummy. Most organic oils, Whale, sweet oil [olive] etc. tend to gum up when mixed with soot, and powder residue then heated. Stick to distilled or 'petro' type oils for most modern guns.

MMCSRET
November 21, 2009, 08:01 PM
Janedoedad: In Idaho fishermen trolling for trout in Mackay Reservoir use WD-40 to spray on their bait after prepping their trolling rig, fish like it and it kills the smell of Humanity. I don't eat catfish, I use the oil for gravy on grits.

billybobjoe
November 21, 2009, 08:11 PM
WD 40 and 3 in 1 suck on bicycles as well as guns.

jimmyraythomason
November 21, 2009, 08:44 PM
If WD-40 gums everything SO badly why does the nozzle on the can NEVER clog in between uses? I have never seen it happen,not even once,since I first started using it in 1972

HOUNDDAWG
November 21, 2009, 10:24 PM
3-IN-ONE oil is a petroleum distillate not mineral oil, and its no different than the stuff we used to get in gun cleaning kits from SEARS or where ever.

For pinpoint lubing of moving parts its fine, but like most oils it will run off or soak into foam or fabric gun cases and leave metal unprotected in high humidity. (My blued guns started rusting in 2 weeks during Hurricane Juan in Louisiana in 1985.)

Also, you don't want to use petroleum based oils on stainless steel guns because it tends to congeal. Vegetable based oils are better for SS hardware.

I can get through a month long duck season with carefully oiling all exposed shotgun metal and running a TICO TOOL through the bore after each hunt, no matter how much wing shooting I do. Shotgun propellants are loaded with graphite which protects the bore and unless there's a mess of melted plastic in the bore (from shot cups/wads-Plastic buildup is a dangerous no no) the barrels won't rust between hunts and there's no reason the break out brushes or solvents. I do carefully and lovingly oil all external metal and wipe off as much as I can get off every hunting day so fingerprints, duck blood or plant sap don't etch the metal.

If I don't fire a rifle during a deer hunt then it's an oil patch in the bore followed by a dry patch after every outing. (again the point is to remove as much oil as you can and the light coating left behind will protect the bore and not build up to eventually pose a dangerous condition or hinder accuracy) and I wipe down all accessible metal surfaces.

IF I SHOOT THE RIFLE once and hunt the next day or so that's fine because it will count as the "oil shot", meaning the next few rounds will be expected to shoot to point of aim once the oil has been "shot out". (assuming dry weather of course-rain changes everything and I take no chances)

But, if the hunts are broken up on separate weekends and I fire even one round the rifle will get cleaned. I can't stand to rack a gun for more than a few days knowing that the bore could be under attack or that copper fouling may reduce the accuracy next time out.

With shotguns the priority is wiping external surfaces (I like using silicone cloths for this) and making sure no moisture is in the bore (including in the threads of removable chokes) or inside the receiver. With rifles the priority is the bore and all other metal that could rust from moisture or fingerprints. It doesn't benefit me to work myself stoopid cleaning every night or to go in the field with a rifle stinking of solvent or oil products.

Generally speaking some of us probably over-cleaned our shootin' irons, especially when we were younger. It's been argued that we wore out more bores with raspy aluminum ramrods and bore brushes than we ever did with live fire, and with .22s it isn't hard to damage the crown that way.

Now days I use common sense and err on the side of caution and I still don't have to clean mah iron as much as I used to believe to keep them rust free and in good working order.

Like all things you must have your priorities straight, so, if you accidentally drive your pickup into the lake remember to hand the rifle up to a buddy then swim back to collect the little woman. (she won't rust)

And, if that's the worst that peeps can say about me, then it probably won't keep me out of heaven.

wally
November 21, 2009, 10:25 PM
If WD-40 gums everything SO badly why does the nozzle on the can NEVER clog in between uses?

The answer is that it does, its just that gum doesn't stick so well to the plastic used for the nozzle and the pressure blows it out next time you use it.

I've had a can that sat for a several years between uses not spray until until I unclogged it with a sewing needle, but it is a lot harder to clog a WD-40 nozzle than it is an Epson printer :(

--wally.

Kimber45acp
November 21, 2009, 11:02 PM
WD 40 and 3 in 1 suck on bicycles as well as guns. People need to stop speaking about wd40 and 3 in 1 as if they are either the same or similar. WD40 is mostly a solvent. As far as this conversation is concerned, it is entirely a solvent. WD40 on a bike is a good way to dissolve grease around bearings (I learned this firsthand) and cause your chain parts to be dry metal on metal.

3 in 1 sucks on bicycles because it stays "wet" and attracts dirt (until it drips/flies off). 3 in 1 isn't bad on a gun (except maybe an AR or other gas impingement type gun). 3 in 1 disappears after a week or so though.

rizbunk77
November 21, 2009, 11:10 PM
Houndawg,

I admire your dedication to cleanliness but on the rifles it is missplaced. You need to read John Barsness's latest article on bore cleaning and rifle accuracy. He kept track of every group and cleaining for a decade or so. He (like my dad) can prove that a rifle shoots it's best groups when the bore is fouled to some extent, and that group size doesn't open up for at least 50 rounds. Your cleaning after every time out is not only unnecessary it is making you a worse shot. Modern residue will not effect your bore if cleaned in a reasonable length of time.
One time I saw my dad whip out a Ruger M77V that was dirty and hadn't been cleaned in at least 3 years but I think longer. He wanted to prove a point: He knew where he would hit and how big the group would be because he never dicks with the rifle before its time to shoot. He shot a 1.5 inch group at 200 yards with reloads and a Weaver K6 scope. Sight the rifle in with a good load and put the sumbich away if you plan to shoot it sometime in the next year. The less dicking with things you do the better, simpler is always better. Thats why you should also never dry fire the rifle in the house to store it with a relaxed firing pin. Biggest bunch of crap I have ever heard of. Your wearing out your rifle and risking shooting a relative.

22-rimfire
November 22, 2009, 12:03 AM
I have never had a problem with 3 in 1 oil on firearms. It was all we used for years in my family. Never any rust. Never any issues. It is basically a very light machine oil such as you might use on sewing machines. I probably have two or three cans lying around.

I think RemOil is a much better product. I use Breakfree sometimes and other lubricants as well. Since RemOil sits on my desk, it tends to get used to wipe down firearms. I don't care much for the aerosol cans of RemOil however. Makes a mess and you tend to use way too much oil.

justashooter in pa
November 22, 2009, 12:28 AM
dunlaps Gunsmithing has no good words for 3 in one or automotive oils. neither is stable enough for use on guns. both of them solidify and leave behind crud that needs to be cleaned periodically.

-eaux-
November 22, 2009, 01:40 AM
I repaired many a gun that didn't work only because of the 3in1.
REALLY?
c'mon now. i have a hard time swallowing that one.

-eaux-
November 22, 2009, 01:43 AM
i'll gladly concede that it isn't the ideal gun preservative, but "makes guns not work"
???
c'mon.
maybe if you marinate your weapon in 3n1 for a couple days, then leave it in the lint trap of your clothes dryer for a few cycles.

bkjeffrey
November 22, 2009, 02:51 AM
I say again, Ive put 3n1 through the paces in my AK (and AR) with no problems. Ive tortured those guns. And tortured the 3n1 in them, and I can say first hand that 3n1 will not gum up, will not bake off and will not cause weapons malfunctions. Ive literally poured 3n1 down be bbl of my smoking hot AK and fired hundreds of rounds afterwards with no probs. (Shame on me)

To answer the original posters question........ Use 3n1 freely and have no quarms about it. Your firearms will be just fine.

mete
November 22, 2009, 07:09 AM
-eaux, yes REALLY !! I'm talking about 25 years ago Perhaps it's changed now. I remember one gun I couldn't even take apart because of the 3in1. It got to be if I found a gun with lots of varnish I would ask 'have you been using 3in1 ? ' Usually they had.
Petroleum oils are refined to get the proper viscocity .Turbine oils are refined more than others and this removes waxes [paraffin] which gum things up in the cold. A 'package' of additives is added depending on the use .Anti-oxidants, viscocity improvers, rust preventers, emulsifiers [always used in engine oils to emusify water that may leak into the engine] ' etc.
Most gun owners use too much lube ! "Cleaning" means to remove old lube, dirt and powder residue ! Spraying lube into the gun without cleaning leaves a goop of dirt,powder,oil which may cause malfunction [worked on a 1911 that went full auto because of that !]
Clean , lightly lube is the proper way. If you think gun oil is too expensive then use Mobil 1.

Drail
November 22, 2009, 09:25 AM
++++1 mete. I have "repaired" many .22 semiauto rifles and pistols that were totally gummed up with whatever they found in their garage and squirted the action full of it. WD 40 was the most common culprit. I used to work at an aviation service facility and experimented with various oils for aircraft as gun lube and turbine oil is a very good lube but that stuff stinks so bad I couldn't stand to have it around. For some reason the cans always leaked after they sat around for a while. Very messy stuff. Ashless dispersement mineral oil for breaking in new aircraft engines is also a very good lube.

Mt Shooter
November 22, 2009, 11:17 AM
Works great to fry catfish in; kills the taste!!!!!!!!!!!


I have one coffee splatter keyboard for sale!

Fburgtx
November 22, 2009, 12:27 PM
Will 3 in 1 work?? Sure, it'll work. However, there's WAY better options available these days.

For $3.49, I can go and get 4 oz. of Break-Free CLP from the local Academy store. For $5.99, I can get 4 oz. of Corrosion-X from the local gun shop. Either one of these provides VERY good corrosion protection and both are pretty decent lubricants.

Yeah, you could use motor oil or some other concoction, but we're only talking about saving $3-$4 on stuff we're putting on $500-$1000 guns. That's what I call "penny-wise and pound-foolish". We know that those two(CLP and Corrosion-X) are relatively safe around synthetics. How safe is that "mystery" oil???

If you plan on firing hundreds of rounds at one sitting, there really is no substitute for grease or a "heavy" lube.

I'm sure someone will come on here talking about the greatness of Eezox. It may work fine, but it's MUCH more toxic than the other oils I mentioned. Also, I've yet to see any of this stuff at any of the gun stores I've been to here in DFW (I'm talking more than 10-15 gun shops).

SlamFire1
November 22, 2009, 01:07 PM
Yeah, you could use motor oil or some other concoction, but we're only talking about saving $3-$4 on stuff we're putting on $500-$1000 guns.

Modern motor oils are fantastic lubricants. Millions are spent each year in automotive lubrication research. I suspect most gun oils are simply repackaged industrial, or automotive lubricants.

I used a quart of 10W-30 Mobil one with much satisfaction. When that was gone, I bought some synthetic Castroil because it cost less. That bottle may be a 20W-40 or a 10W-40. I wanted a thicker oil.

By the way, diesel engine oils have more additives than gasoline engine oils.

I still have a couple of cans of LSA, and have tubes of Lubriplate 105 grease. http://www.lubriplate.com/images/L0034-094.jpgI paint the grease on rifle bolts, the cocking cams, etc.

LSA is an excellent cold weather lubricant for M1’s, M1a’s. I use motor oil on my AR’s regardless of outside temperature.

Just keep those firearms clean and lubricated.

X-Rap
November 22, 2009, 01:28 PM
I had to throw away a whole safe full of guns because they got WD-40 on them.

wishin
November 22, 2009, 02:23 PM
This is the kind of post that brings out many unsubstantiated opinions. As they say, opinions are like *********s, everybody has one! I haven't the foggiest about the value of 3in1, but I've used whatever oil was available at the time for my guns, keep them wiped down regularly and have not had rusting problems. That is unless I stored a gun outside in the rain.

Mt Shooter
November 22, 2009, 04:39 PM
Lubriplate 105 grease

I found it tends to "melt" when firing and tends to make a mess and attracts dirt while out on the range.

jimmyraythomason
November 22, 2009, 04:55 PM
Since every lubricant is destructive to firearms in one way or another,I suggest removing all of it with hot soapy water or brake cleaner and using them dry until they are worn out. It appears that using something successfully for 4 decades is not enough to prove it is safe to use. My grandmother's old treddle Singer sewing machine was oiled with 3n1 oil(at least for the 50 years that my mom had it)and nothing else. The old oil was never cleaned off nor needed to be. It never got gummy and the machine never slowed down. In my court,my personal experience trumps all the internet experts. And +1 for Lubriplate 105,it is an excellent grease for guns.

paintballdude902
November 22, 2009, 04:57 PM
ive used it doesnt work bad.

but it depends on the gun if its a gun like a bolt action i like a more solid oil since i feel like it stays there better (if im out of 3 in 1 ill use 20w-50 just like i run in my bronco) for semi autos i like remoil and for semi auto pistols i like remoil and grease for the rails

-eaux-
November 22, 2009, 06:26 PM
Most gun owners use too much lube !
i have to wholeheartedly agree with that. i would tend to believe that this is the root of the problem of gumming a lot more so than what type of lube is used.

DAVIDSDIVAD
November 24, 2009, 12:26 PM
Works great to fry catfish in; kills the taste!!!!!!!!!!!


Enjoy ur toxicity

HoosierQ
November 24, 2009, 12:38 PM
3 in 1 is a fine oil and a fine lubricant. It does not have particularly good rust inhibiting properties unless it is constantly applied. 3 in 1 is just fine for lubing up a dry gun.

WD-40 is a different matter altogether. I have never used it on guns...just didn't. I did use it to pre-lube a bunch of utility knife blades that you store in the handle of the sliding utility knife...you know the kind. After 9 months I went to get a fresh blade out and it was as if there was varnish all up inside the works of the knife and coating each blade...had to pry them apart. I had to use CLP and elbow grease to clean the mess up. Did the same thing at other times with 3 in 1 and no such problems.

3 in 1 is just fine. There are just better alternatives. Some of those are not gun oil. Synthetic 5W-30 motor oil is great gun-oil and is even cheaper than 3 in 1.

I am a Breakfree and Gunslick (a grease) man myself when it comes to firearms but 3 in 1 goes on from time to time.

MMCSRET
November 24, 2009, 02:13 PM
In steam engine rooms on old navy ships we fried steaks in steam turbine lubricating oil(2190TEP), probably already toxified!!!!!!!!!!!!!

billybobjoe
November 24, 2009, 09:55 PM
There are some who use Vaseline on their gun. This is my gun and this is my rifle....

goon
November 24, 2009, 10:34 PM
My grandfather used it on all his guns for like fifty years. Worked OK for him.

1SOW
November 24, 2009, 10:39 PM
Yes, virtually any oil will reduce friction and help prevent corrosion.

Pull your car's dip-stick out and you have another source for gun lube in a pinch.

rogertc1
November 24, 2009, 10:39 PM
Nothing is better than pure Sperm Whale Oil. Hard to find however.

klover
November 24, 2009, 11:20 PM
"For $3.49, I can go and get 4 oz. of Break-Free CLP from the local Academy store. For $5.99, I can get 4 oz. of Corrosion-X from the local gun shop. Either one of these provides VERY good corrosion protection and both are pretty decent lubricants."

Just try the above, and you will realize just how inferior ANY other products are. BoeShield T9 for corrosion is also a very excellent product.

Break-Free is totally awesome even if you use it only once in the life of a weapon. Seems to "slick up a slide" forever!

The military uses vapor paper and plastic chips in air tight cans for long term storage. I have been using these products (from Brownell's) for the past 15 years in a very wet environment with excellent results. I never do oil my guns once a week or day or month. My God, I would not have time to go to work!

Not to mention oil in a rifle chamber can put undue stress on the bolt because the case can slide back with greater force than a dry rifle chamber.
Most newbies way over oil their guns, only to attract lint. Use a tooth pick to apply the BreakFree in very small amounts, and you are good to go!

3 in 1! Give me a break! And I have seen 3in1lube sewing machines for the past 50 years of my life!

Get a life for your guns!:banghead::banghead::banghead:

I can't believe this.....3in1?????:eek: Come on!!!!! Rant, rant............!!!!!!

hometheaterman
November 24, 2009, 11:28 PM
Yeah I have some Break Free CLP at the house and usually either use that or Remington oil. However, when I asked this question it wasn't a option as I didn't have it with me and the nearest store that sold it was 30 minutes away. I just needed some oil to put on my gun after it had gotten wet out in the rain so that it didn't rust. The 3 in 1 oil seemed to do the trick. Now it's back to using either Remington oil or Break Free CLP.

DAVIDSDIVAD
November 25, 2009, 12:50 AM
In steam engine rooms on old navy ships we fried steaks in steam turbine lubricating oil(2190TEP), probably already toxified!!!!!!!!!!!!!

http://cdn0.knowyourmeme.com/i/2270/original/political-pictures-do-not-want-surprised-guy.jpg

LaserSpot
November 25, 2009, 01:46 AM
Eezox is probably the best product for long term storage because it's designed to dry and create a lubricating film; unlikely to gum anything up. Any kind of oil will dry out eventually.

I now use Break-Free CLP for everything because I ran out of Eezox.

Heavy whipping cream would be good enough to keep an AK running.

WingRider
November 25, 2009, 02:03 AM
I spray a little in the barrels when cleaning. And also use it in the mags. Love the smell of this stuff:)

billybobjoe
November 25, 2009, 02:17 AM
I worked in a bicycle shop for many years and Yes! WD 40 is good for cleaning.

ol' scratch
November 25, 2009, 09:21 AM
I don't put WD40 or 3-in-1 on anything except sticky bolts. I don't even put it on bike chains because it messes up the chains. Both WD and 3-in-1 evaporate and collect crap. I do a lot of riding and have found the both products just don't cut the mustard. I don't even use them for cleaning.

My favorite gun oil is Moble One synthetic. I use 15 50 and it works great. It stays where I put it and lubricates better than anything I have found. I use CRP to clean and then apply the Moble one.

The Deer Hunter
November 25, 2009, 09:22 AM
I would use straight 10w30 motor oil on my guns if I had to, as I wouldn't hesitate to use 3 in 1 on my guns. If it came down to my gun getting rusty and I had no way of getting oil before my gun was all fubar, I would use 3 in 1 before running it dry after being drenched.

The Lone Haranguer
November 25, 2009, 05:41 PM
It works, but with long term use the solvents/carriers (which give it its odor and help it to flow into crevices) evaporate and leave congealed oil behind.

GUNDOC454
November 26, 2009, 12:55 PM
I have found that one of the best type of oils that can do multiple tasks is breakfree 3 in 1. It lubricates, cleans & has rust protective additives. For home use it works well. When you go afield keep a utility pack with you and put a teflon rag, and a small squeeze bottle of break free and a small spray bottle of wd-40. The wd-40 (water displacement & penetration solution) is only used on the exterior of your gun. Before you go to bed spray a coating on your whole gun, stock and all wipe the excess off that you can see and the condensation during the night wont hurt your gun and if you get caught in the rain it will protect it from superficial rust starting till you can dry your gun.

X-Rap
November 26, 2009, 09:12 PM
Good show Doc. I have treated my guns to a wipedown of WD since as far back as I can remember, stock and all and have seen no ill effects.
I use a rag that sets in the safe and when I handle one I give it a rubdown and refresh the rag every now and then.
Tetra makes fine lube products and I maybe use harsher stuff on my barrels but run a oil patch after cleaning. Breakfree is good too.

jimmyraythomason
November 27, 2009, 07:16 AM
Be careful using WD or ANY other pentrating type oil on a wood stock. It wont harm the finish but will penetrate the wood(and turn it dark)where ever the finish is lacking.

Deltaboy
November 27, 2009, 08:16 AM
My Grandfather swore by 3-1 oil, Commercial Fisherman on the White River in Ark use it for Rods and Reels and all sorts of lube and rust protection. Same with WD-40.

I used it till I got a hold of CLP and I use it and Rem oil for my guns and other toys.

X-Rap
November 27, 2009, 09:25 AM
Be careful using WD or ANY other pentrating type oil on a wood stock. It wont harm the finish but will penetrate the wood(and turn it dark)where ever the finish is lacking.

I've heard that before but don't see it to be honest, the oldest gun I have is a 92 win saddle ring and it has had that treatment since at least 1970. Close to 40 yrs and no damage.
I don't think a person needs to soak them in a vat of it and don't know if it does any good but I sure have seen enough guns treated this way to know it does no harm and my guns do not rust and don't get the weekly or monthly cleaning that some here claim.

jimmyraythomason
November 27, 2009, 10:13 AM
It will penetrate the wood if there isn't finish isnt on the wood. Finish that has been damaged or removed leaves the wood unprotected and oil(not oil finish) is soaked up like a sponge. This isn't urban legend,it is fact.

X-Rap
November 27, 2009, 05:02 PM
It will penetrate the wood if there isn't finish isnt on the wood. Finish that has been damaged or removed leaves the wood unprotected and oil(not oil finish) is soaked up like a sponge. This isn't urban legend,it is fact.
__________________

:scrutiny:But WD-40 is not oil it is solvent or:confused:
My 90 year old gun is in pretty fair condition but the finish is not pristine. I don't need urban legends to see what I see and there are no darkend spots other than what one would expect on a old gun that has seen nearly a century of use.
I also use it on oiled finishes like that on the older BLR and Citori Superlight if it was a solvent I would think that those finishes would be damaged also but in 20+ years I see no deterioration in either:confused:
To each his own but I think the damage done by :evil:WD-40 is what is urban legend, perhaps we need to submit this to Myth Busters for their show.

jimmyraythomason
November 27, 2009, 07:27 PM
I was including WD-40 with any liquid that would likely be put on a firearm(you can classify it any way you wish)oil,solvent or whatever. The fact remains that unprotected wood is going to absorb it and it will with time turn dark. That discoloration is very difficult to remove. Mineral spirits can remove some and bleach can help too but it never will equal unstained wood. I like WD-40 and have no qualms about wiping down a wooden stock with it as long as none runs onto unfinished wood.

X-Rap
November 27, 2009, 09:53 PM
I guess this is a case of two people looking at the same thing and seeing something different. Kinda like those ink blots the shrinks use on TV.

HOUNDDAWG
January 5, 2010, 03:34 PM
Houndawg,

I admire your dedication to cleanliness but on the rifles it is missplaced. You need to read John Barsness's latest article on bore cleaning and rifle accuracy. He kept track of every group and cleaining for a decade or so. He (like my dad) can prove that a rifle shoots it's best groups when the bore is fouled to some extent, and that group size doesn't open up for at least 50 rounds. Your cleaning after every time out is not only unnecessary it is making you a worse shot. Modern residue will not effect your bore if cleaned in a reasonable length of time.
One time I saw my dad whip out a Ruger M77V that was dirty and hadn't been cleaned in at least 3 years but I think longer. He wanted to prove a point: He knew where he would hit and how big the group would be because he never dicks with the rifle before its time to shoot. He shot a 1.5 inch group at 200 yards with reloads and a Weaver K6 scope. Sight the rifle in with a good load and put the sumbich away if you plan to shoot it sometime in the next year. The less dicking with things you do the better, simpler is always better. Thats why you should also never dry fire the rifle in the house to store it with a relaxed firing pin. Biggest bunch of crap I have ever heard of. Your wearing out your rifle and risking shooting a relative.
rizbunk77:

Good post.

A careful reading of my post will show that I didn't recommend cleaning after every outing. I specifically said that after firing a single shot I'd leave the bore fouled to constitute the "oil shot". This is the first shot which often results in flyers when bench shooting because of the residual oil in the bore.

And, keep in mind that hunting accuracy is not the same as bench rest accuracy. Most of us bench shooters would clean the bore after every 5 shots when trying to "put em all through one hole" or working up that "magic load" for competition or our long range varmint rifles.

I agree with everything you wrote, and I think you'll see that my post it entirely consistent with it but for one detail. John Barsness's article seemed to make no provision for those of us who hunt in rainy and snowy climates. My suggestions for bore care were quite different when I lived in Southern California and Arizona than they are now in Delaware, Pennsylvania and Maryland. In this neck of the woods it would take quite a while for me to fire fifty rounds from a hunting rifle, and in that time the bore would likely corrode if left unattended.

tc54
January 5, 2010, 05:04 PM
i've used 3n1 oil (and numerous other gun oils i had on hand) for at least 40 years. i keep a couple rags (well oiled with 3n1 or whatever i put on the rag last) in zip bags. their sole use is to wipe down guns after i have used them. never had any gun rust, and this includes several years in alaska. use what you believe to be sufficient, but from my experience 3n1 works just fine.

Sudden Impact
January 5, 2010, 10:36 PM
Second generation CLENZOIL user here!

Won't hurt wood...

Dries yet still protects...

Best LAZY man's rust protectant yet!

I have an old Win '94 from my Grandpa that was almost impossible to keep from rusting. Dad coated it with Clenzoil when he had it and set it in the rack...never touched it for years and it still hasn't rusted, though I've only wiped it down a few times in thirty years!

Yup! I'm lazy but my guns aren't rusty!:D

berettaprofessor
January 6, 2010, 11:12 AM
I won't get into the whole CLP vs. Motoroil vs. 3in1 vs. poop argument, but I will say that I recently bought a used 1981 Single Six that was in good condition finish-wise, and I'd love to know what the previous owner was using for lubrication because it had dried out at the hammer and trigger joints and around the cylinder to a hard yellow glaze that was difficult to remove. Haven't seen that on my CLP or EEzox guns, although I'll admit I haven't been at it 25+ years yet.

Laserspot; MidwayUSA has EEZox.

powerhouse
January 6, 2010, 09:04 PM
"Yeah, you could use motor oil or some other concoction, but we're only talking about saving $3-$4 on stuff we're putting on $500-$1000 guns"

Regardless of the price mobile1 synthetic works better than any gun oil I've used.

Stophel
January 6, 2010, 09:28 PM
3 in 1 has worked fine for me, though I would NOT want to use it for long term storage. I think it tends to gum up over time. I have "fixed" some old shotguns that were absolutely rigid only because the oil had gummed up (and I like to have never gotten the guns apart!!!). I do not know what kind of oil was used, however. Yes, actual "gun oil" is better, but 3in1 will work OK. ;)

WD40 is death to steel. It is WAAAAAY too thin. It simply runs off the metal, leaving it bare, and it takes any good oil that was on before along with it. I used to work for a company that sold industrial sewing machines. We had several machines set up for display/experimentation in the other warehouse. They were fine as they were, but we were told to go over and spray them down with WD40 to "keep them from rusting". I knew what would happen, but I did it anyway. Within a few days, rust city.

Actually, I often use motor oil!!! Seems to work quite well.

Carl N. Brown
January 8, 2010, 10:07 AM
I use WD40 as a cheap cleaner, not as a lube. And if you think 3-in-1 gums up over time, spray some WD40 in a cup and put some real gun oil in another cup, and let them sit, checking them maybe once a week. As the solvent in WD40 evaporates, the water displacement wax gets gummier and gummier. A decent gun oil stays fluid.

WD40 and 3-in-1 are good for certain applications, or they would not still be around, but they are just not substitutes for a dedicated gun oil.

ADDED: Gun oil is formulated NOT to oxidize and form a varnish over time. My first and I hope my last experience disassembling and reassembliing the lockwork of a S&W, was when I encountered a Chief's Special that had belonged to a retired relative: the gun would not fire and the oil inside the lockwork was a brown, hard varnish. The original owner was deceased and the gun had not been fired after retirement--may be ten years. It is worth it to spend a little extra for the good stuff, especially for long term storage.

jimmyraythomason
January 8, 2010, 11:21 AM
Ah! The old "WD-40 causes rust" myth again. I guess people will believe whatever they want.

Drail
January 8, 2010, 12:21 PM
Dexron automatic transmission fluid. Don't laugh until you try it. Also one of the best lock lubes around.

Stophel
January 8, 2010, 12:54 PM
WD40 doesn't cause rust. It allows rust to happen.

jimmyraythomason
January 8, 2010, 01:00 PM
WD-40 is actually a very good rust preventative. <http://www.brownells.com/.aspx/lid=10700/guntechdetail/Gun_Cleaning_Clinic__Knowing_the_Limits_of_Rust_Preventatives>

Cranky CJ
January 8, 2010, 01:52 PM
Don't laugh. I have used synthetic motor oil as a lube. M1 5w-30. Worked well I thought.

Stophel
January 8, 2010, 03:15 PM
I think so too. It lubes well, stays put, and prevents rust. I don't THINK that gumming over time is a problem. What more could you want? :D

Horsesense
January 8, 2010, 07:01 PM
If your talking rust prevention, you should try car wax. I have guns that I waxed years ago and done nothing else to, they are perfect. I'm talking strip the thing down and wax everything that is steel (except firing pins etc. where tolerances and buildup could be an issue) inside the mags, springs, external etc.

PMJR
January 8, 2010, 08:58 PM
:scrutiny:I use remington oil, however, when my ppk/s came back from recall work done on it I could have sworn it had the ditinct smell of 3 in 1 oil. I'm sure it wasn't but it sure had the smell of it.

Stophel
January 8, 2010, 10:29 PM
My "beater rifle" has all the exposed metal parts varnished. THAT keeps it from rusting! ;)

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