Calculating the cost of reloading 9mm


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thelaststand
December 4, 2009, 11:30 AM
I can find 9mm bullets for 10 cents each and primers for about 3 cents each
Does anyone know what the powder will cost?

Also are there bullets for cheaper than that?

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wmurphy
December 4, 2009, 11:43 AM
There's 6999.9998 grains in a pound of powder. Let's say you're loading 5.0 grains, and a pound of power costs $20:

20/6999.9998 = ~.0029

.0029 * 5.0 = $.0145 per round

Or, I think there's a complete load calculator on www.handloads.org. I've created and Excel spreadsheet that does this for me. Let me know if you'd like a copy.

Afy
December 4, 2009, 11:43 AM
Powder cost:

(Cost per lb/7000)x charge in grains.

Cheaper bullts probably. I am sure someone will be around shortly.

thelaststand
December 4, 2009, 12:15 PM
The cheapest I can get for factory loaded 9mm is about 21 cents per round (after taxes) and that will go up after the walmart/federal and winchester contracts expire. Then monarch at academy will be the cheapest at 25 cents per round.

So given about 10 cents per bullet, 3 per primer and 1.5 for gunpowder and assume the brass is free because I'm going to collect my own and pick up what I can at the range.

14.5 cents per round.

If I share reloading equipment cost with my brother I think it may be worth it.

bullseye308
December 4, 2009, 12:40 PM
Look into cast bullets or possibly casting your own and you will save even more. I cast bullets from free lead(thank you craigslist) and my cost for 9mm is ~15.00-powder & 25.00-primers or 40.00/1000. I load with Bullseye at 3.8gr and buy it in 4lb jugs. Even if you buy your lead you will still save a significant amount over factory. My caost to load 38, 357, & 45 is almost the same.

Sam1911
December 4, 2009, 12:47 PM
Shooting cast lead bullets will cut your costs there to about $0.05 a bullet, as long as you're ordering from the manufacturer and not Cabela's or some retail place like that.

-Sam

RandyP
December 4, 2009, 01:08 PM
The longer you reload the more you amortize the cost of the machinery too.

For the very casual shooter, reloading may not make sense, but if you shoot hundreds of rounds per session it likely does.

delta5
December 4, 2009, 01:15 PM
Not only do I shoot several hundred rounds per session, I enjoy reloading as a hobby. Many times at the gunshows I cant find .308 at a good price, or even at all, I can usually find empty shells for sale. So I can at least keep on shooting as long as I can find powder and primers..

editingfx
December 4, 2009, 03:37 PM
My cost:
$0.095/round
$4.72/50

8 lb powder at $154, 6gr charge, primers @ $22/1000, lead 9mm @ $112/2000, free brass

Always having boolits to go BANG.... priceless

Quoheleth
December 4, 2009, 04:34 PM
go to this website:
http://www.handloads.com/calc/loadingCosts.asp

Plug in your actual costs and it does the math for you.

I actually don't even price in my brass costs for anything except my .41 Magnum, b/c I bought that brass. Everything else is reloaded factory ammo. Since I had to buy the ammo anyway - or I picked up what others bought - being able to reload it is bonus.

FWIW, about the cheapest jacketed and plated bullets I've seen are those sold here by longdayjake. The cheapest commercial cast lead I've found is missouribullet.

Q

atblis
December 4, 2009, 04:39 PM
My current cost is $5.40 with jacketed bullets.

Precision delta has the cheapest jacketed bullets I've ever seen.

millertyme
December 4, 2009, 04:40 PM
like Murphy, I have a spreadsheet I've worked up so I can determine my costs. I have a local souce where I get lead, primers, powder, and (need be) brass for reloading 9mm. With a little shopping around I can keep my costs (with purchased brass) under $0.15/round and if i pick up brass at the range and use my own fired brass it drops to a little over $0.09. I'm using the same old Rockchucker and other equipment my dad bought 25 years ago so the machinery cost is negligible. However, I would like to get into a new Lee Pro progressive set up to help rid me of all those nasty empty casingings lying around my shop.

+1 on the gun shows. Like delta5, I have been able to find great deals on consumables at shows. I got a 500 piece box of 240gr Meister LSWC's for $15, a set of 44 Mag dies for $10, 4 lbs of Red Dot in a trade for 150 230gr JHP .45 projectiles (no need for them in my house), and 500 primers for an old, rusty Case trapper (I have enough knives in better condition and the old timer I bartered with really wanted that knife).

armoredman
December 4, 2009, 05:50 PM
Cast, $2.52 per 50, jacketed goes way up to almost $9 per 50, with the current prices on what I just bought. Gonna cast more soon, instead. :)

hometheaterman
December 4, 2009, 06:08 PM
I see you said your price for factory ammo would go up when the Wal Mart Federal/Winchester contract is up. Any more info on this? Is this something happening soon?

blikseme300
December 4, 2009, 08:09 PM
I am often asked if I save money reloading. Frankly, I don't care. I enjoy casting and reloading. If cost is your only concern then you will probably not like reloading as it often is not cost effective compared to surplus or factory ammo.

We reloaders are a strange crowd, but we chose to do what we do.

Just my 2c

Bliksem

millertyme
December 4, 2009, 08:44 PM
+1 Bliksem. My dad got me reloading back when I was a teenager and I have learned to enjoy all the tedious little things we do to get the most out of evey round we fire. Even with my single stage press I don't mind sitting in my shop cranking out my favorite rounds or experimenting with something new. I think I might enjoy reloading more than I enjoy unloading!

rfwobbly
December 4, 2009, 10:46 PM
Not only that but you can place the reloading machine at your brother's house. He'll think you're being a really nice guy. Then you can go into his frig and drink all his beer. That should save you about $2000 a year.

Be sure and add that savings in too. :D

SharpsDressedMan
December 4, 2009, 11:38 PM
I have to add this: 9mm is probably the LEAST economical centerfire to reload, BECAUSE current 9mm factory and re-manufactured ammo is some of the lowest priced stuff to shoot. Just about any other centerfire, from .380 to .500 S&W, costs more per box than many 9mm FMJ offerings. For instance, there is no cheap .45 Colt or .44 Special ammo. Even .25 or .32 auto is $15 a box, more than many 9mm's. Once you start shooting the less common cartridges, reloading starts saving you a lot more. 9mm is now what the .38 Special used to be; plentiful, and as economical as it gets, at the present time.

evan price
December 4, 2009, 11:48 PM
Right now, using components I bought before Obama's coronation, I am loading 9mm Luger for the total price of $3.55 a box, using commercially cast lead bullets.

When I factor in the new cost today, primers are up, powder is up, but now I cast my own bullets. $14/lb for powder in 8# kegs, $25/K for primers in 50K lots, ten cents a pound for wheel weight lead. A few dollars worth of propane to smelt a bucket of lead.

Powder a penny, bullet a penny, primer 2.5 pennies, range brass free. 4.5 cents per shot, $2.25 per box of 50.

thelaststand
December 4, 2009, 11:49 PM
editingfx, where do you get 1000 primers for $22??

millertyme, I'd like that worksheet if you're willing to send it to me

1SOW
December 5, 2009, 01:52 AM
$6.80/50, 124gr, Montana Gold fmj/jhp,4.2 Vit n320, Fedspp, free range brass (cleaning cost, a few cents/500) Switching to Zero 125g JHP this month-I hope....slightly cheaper

Primers are killing me: over $30/1000 shipped....need to order in bulk to save $

Edit for why reload 9mm: I've found that I prefer 124gr jacketed rounds for fun shooting. I load them with a light power factor for fast accurate shooting. I can also load respectable SD rounds for just slightly more money.

Check the cost of 124gr 9mm and also 124gr jhp for SD. It's NOT the Win Value Pak price. (Wal-Mart had Value Pak today for about $24 counting local taxes--$12/50) I shoot anywhere from 100 to 200/week.

Many who buy expensive SD rounds shoot them very little because of cost. I can shoot them regularly without worrying about the cost.

editingfx
December 5, 2009, 08:26 AM
thelaststand - I made a large order at Grafs back in April. I had just started reloading, but figured component costs had to be about to rise since scarcity was such a factor. So I ordered as much as I could afford. (Though by the time they came in, a couple weeks ago, "afford" had moved to a very different place due to the economy. :(

Anyone reading who casts; how much time/hassle is it to cast, compared to the rest of reloading? Using Evan's "penny a boolit" would more than halve my $5/50 cost now.

qajaq59
December 5, 2009, 08:56 AM
You need to think long term. Even if I only saved a 100th of a cent per round I'm way ahead. I've been loading since the 60s. And I shoot only rifles, and I shoot them a lot. I couldn't possibly figure it out now, but I'd bet in that time I've saved enough to buy at least one truck!

NuJudge
December 5, 2009, 09:00 AM
Can I suggest that you use a powder that bulks up well in the case? Using the powder that is cheapest may result in really small charges, which do not bulk up well, and it's hard to tell a double charge from a single charge.

CDD

mongoose33
December 5, 2009, 11:03 AM
"I have to add this: 9mm is probably the LEAST economical centerfire to reload, BECAUSE current 9mm factory and re-manufactured ammo is some of the lowest priced stuff to shoot. "

Very true. There are several reasons I reload (like it, have access to ammo independently of the supply system, better ammo than factory, savings), but I save the least with 9mm.

Still, right now I have to pay about 21.5 cents per round for WWB in 9mm. My costs for 9mm are about 10 cents per round, so I save 11.5 cents per round.

However, if I can reload just 300 per hour on my progressive (and I can do more), 300 * 11.5c is over $33 per hour in "savings." That is, who has a hobby that *pays* them to do it? And who has a part-time job that pays them at that hourly rate? :)

So even though 9mm is probably the least effective in terms of savings, it's still well worth it for me.

I save more w/ .45. Currently WWB costs more than 36 cents per round; I'm reloading .45 for under 14 cents per round. That equates to a per-hour "wage rate" of...lessee.....22 cents savings times 300 rounds per hour--my gosh, I'm rewarding my time at a savings of $66 per hour!

And I *like* reloading--it's relaxing, I get a feeling of accomplishment, I produce better ammo than factory.

The savings are just icing on the cake.

chris in va
December 5, 2009, 03:16 PM
http://img691.imageshack.us/img691/2095/imgp4866.jpg (http://img691.imageshack.us/i/imgp4866.jpg/)

Cast these in about 3 hours with a two hole Lee mold. Roughly 700 in there.

I'm a cheapskate. My casting setup consists of a hotplate, small iron skillet, SS spoon, mini muffin pan, walmart gravy ladle, used Lee Production pot and mold. Sounds like a lot but doesn't come out to be more than roughly $100. I recouped my costs after the first couple castings.

Including reloading/casting equipment costs and materials (primers, powder and lead WW) I can crank out a box of 50 for about $3.

hydraulicman
December 5, 2009, 03:39 PM
68 FMJ 115 grain
30 Primers
17 power pistol

115 if you get free brass

153 if you buy brass from oncefiredbrass.net

shoot lead and you can go cheaper than that

thelaststand
December 5, 2009, 06:25 PM
when making lead bullets is the led hard on a semi-auto pistol? Is the lead bullet as accurate?

Sam1911
December 5, 2009, 08:59 PM
when making lead bullets is the led hard on a semi-auto pistol?

Metallurgically speaking, the lead should be much easier on the barrel than jacketed bullets simply because the metal is softer.

There exists some debate about SOME pistols that use polygonal rifling instead of traditional land-and-groove rifling. (Primarily Glock, H&K, and some Kahr guns.) It has been suggested that the nature of polygonal rifling causes heavy "leading" (lead build up) that contributes to abnormally high pressure spikes. This is often quoted as one of the primary causes of the highly publicized proliferation of Glock "Kabooms." (Insufficiently supported chamber design being the other.)

Wiki tells us:

The manufacturer Glock advises against using lead bullets (meaning bullets not covered by a copper jacket) in their polygonally rifled barrels, which has led to a widespread belief that polygonal rifling is not compatible with lead bullets. Firearms expert and barrel maker, the late Gale McMillan, has also commented that lead bullets and polygonal rifling are not a good mix. Some have made a point of the fact that neither H&K nor Kahr explicitly recommend against lead bullets in their polygonal rifled barrels, and feel that it is probable that there is an additional factor involved in Glock's warning. However, Kahr's FAQ does include a warning that lead bullets can cause additional fouling][1] and recommends special attention to cleaning after using them. In addition, while H&K doesn't warn against the use of lead, at least one well-documented catastrophic incident in an H&K pistol[2] appears to be related to this issue. Furthermore, Dave Spaulding, well-known gun writer, reported in the February/March 2008 issue of Handguns Magazine that when he queried H&K about their polygonally rifled barrels that they commented: "It has been their experience that polygonal rifling will foul with lead at a greater rate than will conventional rifling."

Folks who are very knowledgeable about proper lead bullet hardness, and who trust their own cleaning procedures and testing have reported that they have no problem using cast lead bullets in their Glock (and other polygonally rifled) firearms, but the vast majority of owners seem to avoid putting lead through those guns.

Is the lead bullet as accurate? Oh, heck yeah. You'll never have a complaint that lead bullets aren't as accurate as jacketed or plated. Many, MANY bullseye shooters and other precision pistoleeros have used cast lead for generations.

-Sam

thelaststand
December 5, 2009, 11:33 PM
Does anyone know of a good place to buy lead ingots? cheaper than ebay (with shipping seems to be about $1/lb of lead)?

Seedtick
December 6, 2009, 05:33 AM
-

thelaststand asked -
Does anyone know of a good place to buy lead ingots?


You bet we do.

The best place anywhere to buy lead bullets is also the best
place anywhere to buy casting alloy to make your own bullets.

Missouri Bullet Company (http://www.missouribullet.com/index.php)
and
Their Bullet Casting Alloy (http://www.missouribullet.com/results.php?category=12)

They even like us so much they give us a discount.
Here is the info on THR discount (http://www.thehighroad.org/showpost.php?p=6006629&postcount=161).

ST

:cool:

qajaq59
December 6, 2009, 08:07 AM
If you are going to buy ingots be sure your source is very reliable. And I believe Missouri and a couple of others are. However you could start looking for lead wheel weights in your local recycling center or some of the places that sell tires. Just be sure you sort out any zinc before you start melting it.
And lead shoots just as accurately as jackets in most guns, if you load it correctly.

Nuke8401
December 6, 2009, 08:38 AM
Whenever prices are discussed here at THR I see prices in posts that I have personally haven't seen in the past year, primers $22.00/1000, 9mm bullets 66/1000 etc. I live in the world where I buy from retailers today, not uber secret deals from dealer buddies or use prices for stuff I bought in the 1950ís

Based on current real prices: Berrys, plated 9mm 115 80.88/1000 or hard cast 81.88/1000, titegroup 16.29/1 lb or 111.99/8 lbs and small pistol primers 32.99/1000 and free cases my cost is roughly 6.25/50 or 12.5 cents/round. A box WWB is about 12.99 around here if you can find it.
As far as the wheel weight bullets go, sure they might be fine for low volume reloading but for hundreds of rounds a week not practical.

If you are thinking about reloading because of cost; if you spend 150 on the low end or 400 for mid range equipment then it would take 1200/3200 rounds to break even.

Iím not picking on anyone about their prices just using everyday prices normal guys have to pay, since most of us arenít ďuber specialĒ.

editingfx
December 6, 2009, 09:06 AM
Whenever prices are discussed here at THR I see prices in posts that I have personally haven't seen in the past year, primers $22.00/1000, 9mm bullets 66/1000 etc.

I only started a year ago, so I'm far from "uber"-anything! But, those are prices from this year, with no deals involved.

147 Grain 9MM FP, $56/1000 at Missouri Bullet (buy 2k lots)
http://www.missouribullet.com/results.php?category=9&secondary=8

CCI SPP at Graf & Sons, sorry, I did make a mistake there, forgot the hazmat & shipping, which brought it to $23.04/1000 (obviously I didn't buy just 1k to get the hazmat amoritized that low), but $110/1000

http://www.grafs.com/product/256547

blue_ridge
December 6, 2009, 10:33 AM
I just bought a nice Lock-n-Load press from Midsouth Shooters Supply for $368 + $20 shipping. If purchased before 12-31-09 you send in a rebate to Hornady for 1000 bullets. They let you choose from a good list of commonly used good quality jacketed bullets (e.g. - 45 cal 185gr. XTP). Kind of hard to pass up if you ask me.

Regarding casting lead bullets. Is that safe? Might be a dumb question, but I know lead is not the safest of materials and have heard questions about lead exposure just from shooting lead bullets. Is casting lead a safe process? (exposure to lead?)

Walkalong
December 6, 2009, 11:26 AM
Lead is perfectly safe if you wash your hands after handling it, don't mix it with your Red Man, and don't sniff the lead pot while casting.

Cleanliness and common sense is the key.

Those are gorgeous chris in va

RandyP
December 6, 2009, 01:12 PM
I reckon I'd add that I reload for several reasons, and cost vs factory ammo was just the starting point. I also appreciate the fact that with my careful purchasing and inventory of components there is NO ammunition shortage I need worry about, not now nor in the forseeable years to come.

There is also something positive to be said about making something with your own two hands. I am 60 yrs old and in this 'new age' of throw away economics, where just about nobody knows how to fix anything, I can be self reliant in my shooting needs and pass that skill to the next generation.

nulfisin
December 6, 2009, 01:21 PM
No offense, but cost is not a great reason to load 9 mm. If you get better performance or can't buy cheap ammo at the store, then reloading is your only real option. Otherwise, I'd pay a little more at the store and spend my time reloading a more expensive round.

My personal favorite rounds are 45 LC and 44 Sp. Reloading even a few boxes of those rounds gives you some great savings right away. Plus, it's more fun because you have a bigger range of safe loads to experiment with.

Marlin 45 carbine
December 6, 2009, 09:14 PM
I've loaded cast slugs for practice when I did 'shoot&scoot' and left the brass laying. likely had more time in it than it is worth.
I always save&scrounge new fired brass to handload with 'premium' slugs for friends and relatives - saves some money.

fireflyfather
December 6, 2009, 09:33 PM
8 lb powder at $154, 6gr charge, primers @ $22/1000, lead 9mm @ $112/2000, free brass

OMG where are you buying your powder? That is an outrage. Try powder valley. Even with $20 hazmat and $20 shipping an 8lb jug is less than that. If you are ordering more than 1 jug and/or a few thousand primers, you can spread out the hazmat and shipping quite a bit.

Can I suggest that you use a powder that bulks up well in the case? Using the powder that is cheapest may result in really small charges, which do not bulk up well, and it's hard to tell a double charge from a single charge.

CDD

Actually, Red Dot and Promo are among the cheapest powders out there for pistol and cast bullet rifle loads. They also tend to be pretty damn bulky. So much so that it is almost a compressed charge with certain heavier bullets in 9mm (Truncated Cone 124 grain @ 3.0 to 3.5 grains of red dot comes to mind).

fireflyfather
December 6, 2009, 09:44 PM
Casting roughly quadruples the time involved in reloading, or even more, depending on your casting procedures, equipment, whether you do it in big batches or small, etc. Right now I have enough cast to last me several years (except for rifle bullets, which I don't shoot that many of. Less than 50 per range trip, and I only shoot a couple times a year). In an hour of casting, I can cast about 50-100 good, usable bullets. That doesn't count the time scrounging for cheap lead, sorting out the junk weights & tire stems, smelting the lead prior to putting it into the casting pot, and lubing the bullets. Then there is the sizing and re-lubing, and sometimes adding gas checks for rifle bullets or magnum pistol rounds. It is definitely an involved process. If you want to get into it for just pistol shooting, get a lee mold, a small lee pot, and a micrometer. Add in a metal spoon for stirring & fluxing, and you are good to go. If you go for a non-bottom-pour pot you will also need a ladle. If you enjoy reloading & working with your hands you may like casting. If reloading is tiresome to you, then forget casting. I love it but don't have a lot of time for it recently.

Seedtick
December 7, 2009, 12:42 AM
Here is some WW lead for sale in the Trading Post now.

WW Lead (http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=490513)
Idaho Elk Huntr -
57 lbs Wheel weight lead IDAHO

57 pounds of wheel weight ingots for casting.

$60 shipped
paypal ok

Probably won't last long though.

ST

armoredman
December 7, 2009, 01:39 AM
I have a Lee bottom pour pot, and a pot/ladle combo if I want to try that way. I REALLY need to get that pot turned on, too...it is kinda fun, and productive!

editingfx
December 7, 2009, 10:29 AM
OMG where are you buying your powder? That is an outrage.

The prices I gave included haz & shipping. Price was $10 more than PV on powder alone.

Afy
December 7, 2009, 01:46 PM
It costs me about 6 Euros a box of 50 to load a 124 grain fmj with Vithavouri powder, versus about 10 Euros a box of magtec ammo. So I do save a bunch of money.

spartywrx
December 7, 2009, 03:15 PM
Whenever prices are discussed here at THR I see prices in posts that I have personally haven't seen in the past year, primers $22.00/1000, 9mm bullets 66/1000 etc. I live in the world where I buy from retailers today, not uber secret deals from dealer buddies or use prices for stuff I bought in the 1950’s


I placed an order today with Missouri Bullet Co. for 1000 125gr. LRN 9mm bullets. $60.25 including shipping. That was after their 5% THR discount.

As for everything else, its quantity that will get you a discount. Primers bought by the 10k or more really gets the price down. Powder by the 8lb jug or more. And of course, shop around.

thelaststand
December 12, 2009, 11:15 PM
Starting to look for powder

I'm looking at using winchester WSF starting at 5.0 grains per load for 115gr FMJ and total metal jackets. What do yall think? Does anyone else use WSF for 115 grain FMJ? How much powder do you use?

Are there any other good brands for 115 grain bullets?
What about 125 grain lead cast ones?

rfwobbly
December 12, 2009, 11:45 PM
I'm looking at using Winchester WSF starting at 5.0 grains per load for 115gr FMJ and total metal jackets.

I think you'd do better with a slightly faster powder like Win 231, but that's a personal preference. For 115gr jacketed I usually load in the neighborhood of 4.5gr so it's going to use less powder.


Are there any other good brands for 115 grain bullets?

For jacketed, try Magnus, Precision Delta and Montana Gold
For plated, try Berry Mfg
For lead, try Missouri Bullet

billsnogo
December 13, 2009, 11:21 AM
For plated, try Berry Mfg

I just ordered some plated from Berry at Cabelas. They are an sale right now, and if you use there $20 off coupon that is advertised on there home page, I got 750 9mm 115grn bullets, and 500 125grn fp .38/.357 bullets for a grand total after tax (shipped to store, so no shipping) $91.51.

So that is $91.51 for 1250 bullets, or .07 a bullet. I don't plan on casting quite yet as the lead seems a bit hard to come by, and Delta is on backorder, so this seemed pretty decent deal overall....... :o

thelaststand
December 13, 2009, 12:03 PM
rjwobbly, is the 4.5gr for win 231 (for 115 FMJ) a medium load? What should I start with on the low end, 4.3? I heard you don't want to go to low for 9mm because that can cause increased pressures also.

I meant to ask about what powders do yall use and what amount for 115 FMJ or plated
and for 124 or 125 gr Lead Cast bullets.


Don't worry I have my own resources, I just wanted to see what experienced people are using.

RustyFN
December 13, 2009, 12:54 PM
I can find 9mm bullets for 10 cents each and primers for about 3 cents each
Does anyone know what the powder will cost?

Also are there bullets for cheaper than that?

Not sure about the bullets because I cast most of what I shoot. I think you can buy Zero bullets for around 7 cents each. I have shot a lot of zero bullets and they are good. As far as powder and primers if you get a C&R license and buy from Graf's in bulk you can get primers for around 2 cents each and depending on powder $13 per pound or 1 cent per round. Those prices include hazmat and shipping. That should get you close to 10 cents per round. Casting bullets will take some time but can save quite a bit of money.

RustyFN
December 13, 2009, 01:16 PM
Iím not picking on anyone about their prices just using everyday prices normal guys have to pay, since most of us arenít ďuber specialĒ.

Nuke these are todays prices at Graf's with a C&R license. Anybody that can legally own a gun can get a C&R license for $30 for 3 years.

HODGDON TITEGROUP 8LB POWDER 2/CS
Item Number: HDHTG8 ∑ Availability: Out of stock
Add to Cart Price: $98.99

WIN POWDER 231 8LB 2/CS
Item Number: WIN2318 ∑ Availability: Out of stock
Add to Cart Price: $110.79

CCI PRIMER 500 SMALL PISTOL 5000/cs
Item Number: CCI500 ∑ Availability: Out of stock
Add to Cart Price: $94.99

thelaststand
December 13, 2009, 03:09 PM
Very good information

The bullets I'm looking at are Missouri Bullet 125 gr lead cast for about 5.3 cents each if you buy 3000 and you live out of state. My primers were 3.2 cents each and it looks like powder will be 1 cent per round.

That brings it to 9.5 cents per round so far minimum cost.

RustyFN
December 13, 2009, 05:03 PM
I have never use any Missouri Bullets but I have heard a lot of good things about them. I think you will be very happy with them.

bonez
December 17, 2009, 07:53 PM
that will let you quickly determine reloading costs (Included other reloading stuff). If you would like a copy, send me a private message with your e-mail and I'll flip it to you.

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