like what u got and why?


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varmint22man
December 7, 2009, 11:06 PM
Me again. I have a RCBS rockchucker press and a lot of 38's and 357 brass I want to reload.I want to buy equipment only one time and be satisified with.I'm no competition shooter, but I do like to hit what I'm aiming at.
** What would be a good set-up for me ? [what dies--measurer and whatever else you like] Low production 200 rounds a month or so.Would you get a seperate press just for pistol ? What kind make model and why? I have been researching this and I have read that some of the so called cheaper brand dies and measurers out perform the so called high price brand dies and measurers. What would you buy or what do you use and how do you like it ? If you had it to do over again, would you change anything? I want to get started and don't want to regret what I buy or wish I had gotten something else.
Thanks for any ald all info
ALSO any tips or opinions on pistol reloading.

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Encoreman
December 7, 2009, 11:15 PM
Well I started with a used Rockchucker and still load for all rifles and a couple of pistols on it. That said I have a used Dillon Square deal B in 38/357 and 40/10mm. I thought I had died and went to heaven and for months I literally could not pass by it without loading 15-20 rounds. I shoot competitively, not much anymore, but it is sheer joy to load on the dillon. I can easily load 300 rounds an hour of "good" ammo. I have have an RCBS uniflow powder measure, a RCBS 10-10 scale, plus trickler and a nice $20 electronic scale. A Frankford Arsenal tumbler, lyman case trimmer.

lgbloader
December 7, 2009, 11:25 PM
I have a few progressive presses but I no longer shoot the amount that I used to shoot so if I were just starting out, I would keep the single stage you have and invest in a Lee Classic Turret kit from Kempfs. Loads 150 - 200 per hour taking your sweet time.

I may purchase this kit anyways and if my shooting doesn't start to increase more, I may unbolt the XL650's and box them up.

LGB

Randy1911
December 7, 2009, 11:34 PM
To know what is the best equipment for you , you need to think of what you will be doing in the future. When I started I was like you and only loaded 150-200 a month. Here I am 26 years later and I load over 7 calibers and and close to 1000 rounds a month. I loaded for years on a Rockchucker and was happy. I have since moved up to a Hornady L-n-L and I am much happier with the volume I do now. So think about where you think you might be in the future. For what you are doing now the Rockchucker and RCBS Uniflow measure will do nicely.

James2
December 7, 2009, 11:43 PM
You have a good press. It will last your lifetime.
If you haven't got a powder measure, may I suggest a Lyman 55. I have never used powder that it wouldn't drop within one tenth grain. All pistol powders including Unique drops a lot closer than that.

I would prefer a balance scale over a digital.

Dies: I have some from at least six makers. They all do the job. It boils down to what was available locally the day I went shopping. Just one note, I hate the lock rings on Lee dies. The dies are fine.

An RCBS hand primer tool is great. Sure beats the things on the presses for seating primers.

For 200 rounds a month, I would not get a progressive. Single stage loading is fine for that much ammo. If you want to load 500 rounds a week, then yes, a progressive is the way to go.

Lee Roder
December 7, 2009, 11:52 PM
MOST USEFUL: :D

Lyman M die for flaring cases to accept bigger cast bullets allows bullets to seat straighter so your loaded cartridges won't look so lumpy. Other flaring tools don't work as well for me.

Dial calipers and a beam balance, neither of which need batteries

LEAST USEFUL :barf:

a powder trickler, even a manual one, is not really necessary. a spoon is cheaper and works just as well for most of the cases.

50calshooter
December 7, 2009, 11:52 PM
The Rcbs hand tool that has built it auto collet. Do not be cheap and buy the lower in model. The only thing I use on large rifle shells.
Dies Rcbs or Hornady both cost about same unbeatable service. I perfer the new Hornadys cause of the zip spindles. Lee it breaks it cost you money the others it's free. The 10-10 Rcbs or Ohaus thats who make the RCBS very acurate and when you get old you can still see the 1 grain lines.

RandyP
December 8, 2009, 12:38 AM
First off, I submit that nobody can assure you that anything you purchase now will continue to make you happy down the road.

That said I am quite satisfied with my Lee Classic 4-hole turret. It churns out safe, reliable and accurate ammo at a rate of about 150-200 rounds per hour, is economical both to purchase and to change calibers.

StretchNM
December 8, 2009, 02:09 AM
As someone said, you already have a good press, so that's done.

I'd get Lee Deluxe (carbide) dies for the pistol ammo.

USSR
December 8, 2009, 08:28 AM
MOST USEFUL:

Lyman M die for flaring cases to accept bigger cast bullets allows bullets to seat straighter so your loaded cartridges won't look so lumpy. Other flaring tools don't work as well for me.

Dial calipers and a beam balance, neither of which need batteries

LEAST USEFUL

a powder trickler, even a manual one, is not really necessary. a spoon is cheaper and works just as well for most of the cases.

+1.

Don

ranger335v
December 8, 2009, 11:28 AM
" What would be a good set-up for me ?"

Well, your present press is fine for normal quantities of rifle stuff. Seems you want more speed for higher volumes of pistol ammo but keep costs reasonable?

Get a Lee Classic Cast and Lyman or Redding dies. Both include the very nice M die.

The CC press has an "auto-indexing" head, not as fast as a true progressive but no nearly as expensive either! It's MUCH faster than a single stage press and actually rigid and strong enough to load very accurate rifle ammo too.

I have a Lyman turret (manual head) and consider that purchase a mistake! I still use it but it's no faster than my RC II. As a normal type turret system, it's not very rigid so I get all of the disadvantages of a "springy" press and no real advantage in time saved.

Historian
December 8, 2009, 01:18 PM
Maybe I'm just stubborn but I started two years ago with a Rockchucker and cannot see myself changing. I like the idea of crafting each round. Right now I'm loading 500-600 rounds a month of .223 and S&W .40. For rifle I use Forster dies and for pistol I picked up a set of RCBS carbide dies. I am very pleased with both but I don't have experience with pistol dies other than RCBS. However you choose to go, get something that won't make you feel like reloading is a chore. Best of luck.

Historian

mongoose33
December 8, 2009, 02:23 PM
I think you're already leaning in this direction, but buy the best quality stuff you can.


Early on, I knew I wanted a good digital scale. I bought a cheapie--and I got what I paid for. I did a lot of research on scales and ended up buying the Dillon DTerminator. Somewhat pricey; also a godsend. I bought a set of check weights and validated it; dead-on. It's fast, it's convenient, it settles on a weight quickly--in other words, perfect.

I'm not advocating you buy one--just that, if you're like me, you'll regret compromising at some point.

I believe that, in general, the hornady-dillon-redding-rcbs-lyman-forster stuff is generally very good. I see Lee as one step down from that. While much of their stuff is good, it's often more cheaply made. The lock rings on the dies are not as good as the Hornady rings, for instance; the Lee Perfect Powder measure is mostly plastic, and while it works pretty well, you just don't get the same sense of quality as with others. I've had some vexing issues with Lee 9mm dies; they generally do what they're supposed to, but the seater die is inconsistent, and I ended up buying a Hornady set which works great.

Different manufacturers seem to have "specialties" that makes mixing and matching attractive. Dillon's Super Swager and DTerminator, for example, are IMO the best of the lot in those categories. RCBS's X-dies are proprietary, and a godsend for those who don't want to keep trimming rifle brass every time they reload. Redding dies are often considered the very best (though I like the Hornady dies because they have a bullet-alignment sleeve in their seaters).

While many have done well with the Lee equipment, and for some people it's required by their budgetary limitations, I don't see it as being the best in very many categories.

I would have no problem choosing a press from one of the manufacturers listed above. I do have an RCBS single-stage, works great. I have the Hornady LnL AP progressive press, works great. Does that mean Dillon, because I didn't choose it, doesn't measure up? No. Dillon makes great stuff.

So does RCBS. I didn't choose the RCBS progressive for two reasons: Hornady had their get-loaded offer which included 1000 free bullets as part of the deal--and perhaps more importantly, RCBS progressives aren't common, and thus support in online fora such as this one is more difficult to obtain.

That last part, for me, is important. In the end, it was going to come down to Hornady or Dillon for a progressive press. Why? Quality--and availability of support. Based on what you see here, I'd bet you'd find Hornady and Dillon to be the most common progressive presses. Have a question on one? Ask--you'll have a dozen answers by the end of the day. Some other brand? Not so much. And that in itself tells you something.

Just remember: You never regret buying quality.

StretchNM
December 10, 2009, 12:04 AM
Get a Lee Classic Cast and Lyman or Redding dies. Both include the very nice M die.

The CC press has an "auto-indexing" head, not as fast as a true progressive but no nearly as expensive either! It's MUCH faster than a single stage press and actually rigid and strong enough to load very accurate rifle ammo too.

Ranger, did you mean to say the Lee Classic Turret? The Classic Cast is a single stage only (fine press though :D )

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