What parts should I get?


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hometheaterman
December 11, 2009, 12:01 AM
Well, I read what parts I needed but have no idea which brands or what exactly to get. Does anyone have any links? What brands should I get? I kind of want to order a setup for Christmas but have no idea what to order and don't want to have to upgrade later. I want a nice good setup now.

Also do I need different setups to do shotgun shells vs rifle shells? Also how hard is this to learn? Since I've never done it before is it going to be something that's hard to pick up or requires a ton of time?

BTW I would be reloading for a semi auto. Not sure if that matters.

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Ol` Joe
December 11, 2009, 12:11 AM
Read the sticky at the top of this forum http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=238214

You should get a good idea of what it takes to start.

Win1892
December 11, 2009, 12:23 AM
I'm an A/V guy myself.

I would get an RCBS Rockchucker press, digital powder scale, hand priming tool, powder dispenser, calipers, a case trimming kit or a Trim Mate, and a funnel. I feel a single stage press is the best way to learn and if you wind up with a progressive you'll still need everything I've listed. Buy the best and you only buy it once. Shop around for deals and if you get bored with it you'll get most of your money back anyway.

hometheaterman
December 11, 2009, 12:31 AM
See, I've read that and others but still don't fully understand. I go to places to try to price out what it will cost and they have a million other things too that I have no idea if I even need.

I thought I wanted a reloading setup for Christmas but I'm think now it might just be a huge pita that I don't want to deal with. I figured I'd like reloading as I like to target shoot. I figured I could make better bullets at a fraction of the cost. However, I have no desire to sit there all day trying to reload. Nor do I have the desire to put a ton of work into reloading stuff only to save a couple dollars. If It's something that's not that hard to do and not that much work I'd like to do it. However, I'm just not finding that much out about what's actually involved from my reading I've done and I've not been around any reloading what so ever.

Then it seems like I need a ton of different things to reload rifle bullets, shotgun shells, and pistol bullets. I'd like to do all of them but it seems like that's a huge hassle. If I can only reload one bullet it wouldn't be worth it to me really if I still had to buy the others already pre loaded. Then another thing is being that the guns I would reload for including the 30-06 would be semi auto's that worries me. I've heard it's a huge pita to reload for semi auto's. So that has me worried too.

I just can't decide if this is what I want or if I'd be better off to just get something else that I know I'd like.

dmazur
December 11, 2009, 12:34 AM
I can offer a little help, but that's an awfully broad set of questions...

1. I know of no press that handles shotshell reloading and brass cartridge (rifle) reloading.

The shotshell reloading involves crimp dies for plastic, a rather large primer diameter, shot measure as well as powder measure, etc. As in brass cartridge reloading, there are relatively simple shotshell presses as well as more expensive progressive presses. A MEC press is around $150 and a Hornady progressive is $600. Also, these are generally set up for one gauge, I believe.

2. If you don't want to have to buy different equipment later, you have to do enough research to make a "type selection", considering your shooting habits. (I'll use brass cartridge equipment for this explanation, but it applies to shotshell reloading as well, for a second press.) Generally, you will be considering the advantages/costs of single stage vs. turret vs. progressive.

The single stage presses are easier, in that they only do one thing at a time. If you shoot only a few hundred rounds a year, but want them to be custom-tailored to your needs, a single stage can be just fine.

Turret presses are a little faster, because all the dies can be mounted and left adjusted. However, the press still only does one operation per handle stroke. These are faster than single stage, but not as fast as a progressive.

Progressive presses are the most complex, and can be quite time-consuming to set up. However, they are ideal for turning out thousands of rounds per year for competition shooters. It can be challenging to "break out" of the progressive operation for operations like case trimming (for rifle), especially with presses that have automatic indexing. Some reloaders keep a single stage press for resizing and do everything else on the progressive.

Nobody can make this decision for you. You might get lots of answers that recommend one press over another, and the points brought up may be valid if you are comparing presses of the same type. That is, single stage vs. single stage. It isn't valid to compare single stage vs. progressive, for example.

3. If you are reloading for a semiautomatic rifle, you will need to order a full-length resizing die. This is to prevent chambering problems. You should also get a cartridge headspace gauge, which is very useful for setting up the resizing die to the correct length as well as checking for case length (is trimming necessary.)

4. Reloading isn't all that difficult to learn, but it is a process consisting of many, many small details. If you don't understand a detail, you can get into trouble quite quickly. Shooting forums with reloading sections, like this one, are a very useful resource. However, they are no substitute for reading the first 100 pages of a reloading manual. Several times. This probably doesn't qualify as "a ton of time", but it isn't something you're going to master in one evening, that's for sure... :)

5. How much time is required to reload x rounds depends on the equipment you get. As mentioned above, a progressive press is the hardest to set up and the most expensive. For this, you get the most output. Single stage presses are easier to use (generally) and cheaper. With this goes very low production.

I don't know if my rambling clarified anything or just made things look worse. I believe if you get a manual first and read the first 100 pages, things will be a lot clearer.

dmazur
December 11, 2009, 12:48 AM
I've heard it's a huge pita to reload for semi auto's. So that has me worried too.

I'm not sure what you're referring to. Other than full-length resizing, I'm not aware of anything that you have to do to accommodate semiauto rifles.

(Now if you're reloading for a Garand, that has additional issues related to primer seating depth, primer type, powder type, etc. in addition to full-length resizing...but .30-06 semiauto Brownings and Remingtons just need full-length resizing, AFAIK.)

If It's something that's not that hard to do and not that much work I'd like to do it.

It doesn't have to be a time-killer, and I don't think it is all that hard to do. Unless you like reloading as a hobby in itself, you can generally work up an accurate load for your rifle and stick to it. This can take some time initially, and then the payoff is in ammo "tuned" to your rifle, i.e. smaller groups. As long as you keep notes, you can duplicate that round essentially forever. (Assuming they don't quit making your favorite powder.)

On the other hand, there are folks out there who aren't happy unless they have something to "work up". New bullet, different powder, etc. I've heard of someone complaining they were out of brass to reload for "something new", so they drove to the range and shot up a bunch of stuff they weren't too happy with, then drove back. All as quickly as possible, so they would have some brass to work with...this is perhaps someone who likes reloading more than shooting.

Seedtick
December 11, 2009, 01:47 AM
`

hometheaterman,

Take a look at this website, maybe it will give you a better idea of what is involved in this addiction.

Ultimate Reloader (http://ultimatereloader.com/)

Only you will be able to decide if reloading is for you. It is not something that is hard to learn. It is a hobby unto itself that is relaxing and rewarding but to be safe it must be taken seriously.

The majority of the time I like reloading more than unloading.

ST

:)

qajaq59
December 11, 2009, 07:04 AM
I sent you a list of vendors in a PM.

qajaq59
December 11, 2009, 07:40 AM
I've heard of someone complaining they were out of brass to reload for "something new", so they drove to the range and shot up a bunch of stuff they weren't too happy with, then drove back. All as quickly as possible, so they would have some brass to work with...this is perhaps someone who likes reloading more than shooting. I did exactly that yesterday. I had 60 or so .308 that really were not up to par so I went over to the range and emptied them.
Also how hard is this to learn?
Loading is not hard to do. There are less then 10 steps really. But it would be good if you could find someone at your range that does it. Then they can show you how it is done, before you go out and spend money. Why don't you ask around at your local range and gun shops and see if someone will help you out? Or if you live anywhere near me, I'll show you.

Historian
December 11, 2009, 11:24 AM
Before you order anything, obtain and read (twice) a copy of "The ABCs of Reloading". It will take you step-by-step through the procedures for reloading both rifle and pistol ammunition. There are also a number of DVDs available that demonstrate the correct procedures. Reloading is a lot of fun and you will enjoy it but take your time and do your homework before you spend a lot of money on stuff that may disappoint you or that you may not need. Check the Midway.com website for available DVDs. The best way to learn is to have a mentor who has been reloading for a few years and can show you how to enjoy the hobby safely. Remember, safety is the primary concern. You will be dealing with explosives so take the time to study and you will be prepared to enjoy a lifelong hobby which is rewarding and provides new challenges with every caliber that you decide to reload or every new piece of equipment that you obtain. Take your time, enjoy yourself and the ammo that you craft, and above all, be safe. Best of luck.

Historian

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