You people must be millionaires


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Golden_006
December 14, 2009, 10:17 AM
All I have is an SKS that I bought in the Obama scare for $360, and the only other thing I could find that was that cheap and good, was a Yugo one for $260.

The yugo was sold before I could buy it and I heard the Romy's are better anyway; plus you get a chrome lined barrel that I was happy about since I wouldn't know how to clean it/ I can shoot cheap ammo and not worry about it.

And speaking of ammo, is Caballas sale on 7.62x39 really a good deal at 130 dollars for 500rnds? You can get brown bear for 20 bucks cheaper at Cheaper Than Dirt any time. Although the cabellas is a better grade . . . still I need money for other things but I'm down to 3 boxes. Is that pretty much the going rate for ammo? Seems like every trip to the range will cost you more than golf; a rich persons leisure pursuit if ever was one. Not that I know anything about golf . . .

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mcdonl
December 14, 2009, 10:22 AM
Don't get down Golden. There are a lof of people who can spend 1000's of dollars on guns, ammo and accessories. There are also many folks who purchase firearms based on what they can afford.

I own a dozen $200-$300 guns... some folks own 1 or 2 $1000 guns. To each his own. Buy what you can and buy something you can shoot!

You should consider a .22....

MachIVshooter
December 14, 2009, 10:24 AM
Some here have money, but for most of us it's just taken years and meant not spending money on other junk. I don't have any tech gizmos, my furniture is made to last as long as possible, and my newest car is a 1987 Dodge Daytona Shelby.

It's all about priorities

ijosef
December 14, 2009, 10:25 AM
Guns are an expensive hobby, but that's the way most hobbies are. I can't even begin to imagine the money gearheads spend on their project cars. I know a guy who has put almost $10,000 into his custom motorcycle, along with countless hours of labor.

The commie guns are a sore spot for me, especially since I got into the game late. You used to be able to buy an SKS for as little as $60, and a thousand rounds of milsurp 7.62x39 ammo for a hundred bucks. Prices have jumped, and are likely to stay (although things have settled down after the initial election panic).

As far as the Cabelas ammo deal goes, I guess it depends on what brand it is. At the price you quote, you'll be paying about $5.20 for a box of 20 rounds, which is about average.

freakshow10mm
December 14, 2009, 10:30 AM
I'm working on my second million 'cause I sure as hell didn't make the first.

TheWarhammer
December 14, 2009, 10:32 AM
Sounds like you're local to DFW. Avoid CTD and drive down to Military Gun Supply. The prices are better and they weren't price gouging during the ammo scare like CTD was.

As for wealth and guns, most of us aren't rich. We've just been buying guns for many years. If you bought your first gun during the lead up to the BHO Administration, you paid a hugely inflated price and you've had to deal with scarce ammo until very recently. It's not always been like that. A couple of years ago, an SKS was a $50-100 gun and 7.62x39 was $2-3 per box. Hopefully, we'll see those days again.

Walkalong
December 14, 2009, 10:37 AM
I haven't made the first or the second mil. :)

Lots of folks around here just getting started with only a few guns. That was 99% of us at on time or another.

I used to have 4 to 6 guns at any one time, buy the cheapest cast bullets I could find, and caught powder on sale, then started casting and begging wheelweights, just like many folks. Did that for years.

I am very fortunate, after working and pinching pennies for around 35 years, to be able to have more stuff these days. You will too some day. :)

Tirod
December 14, 2009, 10:37 AM
Welcome to the internet. Forums are a place where a wide diversity of people post comments about mutually interesting topics.

Some actually do have the money to spend on expensive toys. If financial statistics have any value at all, they show it's done on a credit card. Not cash. Running up $2k for a hot new firearm is nothing. Selling off the last one to help happens, too. The concept that every poster has other responsibilities like family, car, home, charity, etc actually doesn't exist for this group. They are an influential group - but not the norm.

Consider just getting access to a forum during a busy work day. 40 hour a week people don't have much time to post hourly if they are really doing their job. So - most of what I read comes from those with lots of leisure time, not responsibility. The working gun owner has to crunch his time down to what's important.

Don't worry, the other 80 million gun owners aren't quite the bunch of show-offs you might think fill up forum space. They don't need to come here for that.

sanerkeki
December 14, 2009, 10:42 AM
It does not matter if you bring a HK or a Kel tec to the range what is important is that you take pride in what you have and take care of it.

Norinco982lover
December 14, 2009, 10:45 AM
All the firearms I have purchased have been within the last 3 years. They took a lot of hard work and there have been just as many firearms sold or traded off as have been purchased...so I'm not really sure how I ended up with the 5 that I have now.

Their value adds up to about $1750 so no, I am not a millionaire:D

~Norinco

LeonCarr
December 14, 2009, 10:47 AM
I am a shooter, not a collector. IME most folks that have bunches of guns shoot one or two of them all the time and the rest of them are safe queens. The other 99% are inside the safe saying, "SHOOT ME! SHOOT ME!"

:)

hso
December 14, 2009, 10:48 AM
It's less a matter of what you shoot than how well you shoot what you have.

Some of us have been into guns for decades. That usually means a few good guns that might get shot or a lot of guns that probably won't get shot.

Folks just starting out may decide that one is plenty or get the bug and spend time and money finding and owning different firearms.

MinnMooney
December 14, 2009, 10:50 AM
I like ijosef's idea that Guns are an expensive hobby, but that's the way most hobbies are. :o

My brother's hobby (back in the 70's) was ham radios. He spent a ton of money and bought excellent equipment. Some thought he was foolish but I thought "It made him happy and kept him totally occupied" so where's the harm.

Obviously you're going to find The High Road members will run the gammut of wage earners from unemployed to doctors/lawyers/wall street brokers. Some save for a time just to buy an SKS or a Savage w/blued bbl and syn. stock. Some go on GunBroker.com and buy a Blaser rifle ($4m-$6m) for their 16 year old kids birthday or a matched pair of Krieghoff M-32 12ga O/U shotguns for him and his wife (about $12m-$13m for the pair:what:).

If you do a search on THR for "show your safe", you'll see some have safes the size my basement and they're full of very fine firearms.

Mikil
December 14, 2009, 10:53 AM
It doesn't matter how much you have to spend on a gun,just get what you can afford and enjoy. You can always trade up. the important thing is you are buying guns and ammo. I,d rather buy guns and shoot than eat,but thats just me and I'm sure a few others.

EddieNFL
December 14, 2009, 10:56 AM
I used to have 4 to 6 guns at any one time, buy the cheapest cast bullets I could find, and caught powder on sale, then started casting and begging wheelweights, just like many folks. Did that for years.

...buying primers one hundred at a time, using Lee powder dippers 'cause I couldn't afford a measure, mining berms for range scrap, spend an hour scouring the range for brass after everyone else has gone home, owning a Lee Enfield, but keeping an eye on a sportized Springfield '03...

Some actually do have the money to spend on expensive toys. If financial statistics have any value at all, they show it's done on a credit card.

Very good point. I remember returning to the states after an extended overseas tour and credit cards were available to virtually everyone. About a year later I realized the party was over and the piper wanted to be paid. Since that little lesson in life I'm now considered a deadbeat by CC companies because I never carry a balance. If you're just starting out in life, PAY CASH. You'll reap the benefits later in life.

Sam1911
December 14, 2009, 11:13 AM
Some of us have been into shooting for a long time and bought the majority of our guns back in "the good old days."

Some of us are fortunate enough to have been handed down the beginnings of a pretty decent collection.

Most of us, I'd say, are fortunate to add one to the collection each year. When you think of purchasing one $300-$1,500 luxury item each year, it doesn't seem like so very much.

Now, those of us who shoot competitively are really screwed! 'Cause instead of sitting on a collection of guns and a pile of ammo we bought when the buying was good, we're constantly scrounging to feed the ammo need. For me, that means careful budgeting and planning out my shooting needs far in advance, as well as reloading almost every round I shoot, shooting almost entirely cast lead instead of jacketed, and bulk buying to get the very best deal I can.

I've got lots of match fees and travel expenses to squeeze into that budget as well.

Yeah, it also means that I DON'T spend discretionary income on other things. I don't do home electronics, nice new cars, foreign travel, etc., and try to do as much of my home and vehicle maintenance work myself as possible. If I'm laying in the snow after dark changing a set of shocks on my truck, I'm thinking, "there's $60 for bullets I didn't have to pay a mechanic."

It's about priorities ... and patience.

-Sam

MMCSRET
December 14, 2009, 11:17 AM
Acquiring firearms is not a "hurry up and go" type situation. I was given my first rifle in 1955, had used family guns before that, since then I've bought, sold, traded, had built well over 200. Don't have near that many at any one time, they are just machinery, like cars, tractors or lawn mowers. Keep some cash in your pocket at all times and be on the look out. I picked up, and still do, some very nice guns over the years. Gave some of them away to family members, too. Its all fun!!!!!!!!!!!

jnyork
December 14, 2009, 11:20 AM
As others have said, many of us have been into the gun hobby for a long time, my addiction started about 1945. You might consider getting a good .22 rimfire, MUCH cheaper to shoot and just as much fun.

I have to tell you, I quit drinking about 18 years ago, turned out I had a LOT more money for guns. :)

Would you rather have a nice rifle or go out to eat 3 or 4 times a week? Up to you.

kanook
December 14, 2009, 11:33 AM
I drink little beer
don't smoke, snuff or chew
don't go to bars
limit my lunch spending to $5 a day, and what I don't eat is found money for firearms
rarely go out to dinner (only if the wife says)
I hunt and fish a lot so my freezer is full of meat so less money on groceries
the firearm I have to have today, I'll wait at least 6 months and if the urge is till there

but most of all, I feel sorry for all the firearms staring at me in the shop window waiting for someone to show them love and take them home.

NMGonzo
December 14, 2009, 11:35 AM
40k a year.

Most expensive = $800 colt combat commander (I did not buy coffee or ate out for 4 months)

Least expensive = walter p22 (everybody needs a .22, it came bundled with my snub .357 so i consider it FREE)

Average = $500

I am done with buying handguns.

I have one serious one for every day of the week, every occasion, every type of dressing situation, and every whim so far.

jcwit
December 14, 2009, 11:37 AM
In my case it always looking for the deal, and yea they are out there.

Bought a brand new in the box Springfield S/S .45 Mil-Spec for $350.00, from the dealer, had never been fired, I sent in the warrenty card.

Got a Kimber custom S/S not new but like new for $400.00

Bought a Winchester 52B mfg. in the '40's in perfect shape, no rust, no dings in the stock, missing the hand stop however, wish it had the orginal box too, $50.00.

This only a very few of the deales I've made over the last few years. One thing I look for at a gun show is the gunsmith specials, have picked up some REAL goodies that all they needed was a cleaning.

I carrry this also into purchasing a car. My wifes current car was purchased at 2 years old with 60,000 miles in showroom shape, and mechanically perfect for the grand sum of $3000.00 cash from a new car dealer.

My current winter driver is a rust free 6 year old Escort, excellent condition, purchased for less than $1000.00

Yes deals are out there, just have to search, search, search never quite looking. Of course this might be from me being in purchasing since I was a 14 year old kid.

Guvnor
December 14, 2009, 11:44 AM
When I first started getting into guns a few years ago I caught gun fever and made alot a impulse buys. But several of them have turned into "safe queens" since they are kind of impractical for my use. I wish I had been a little less impulsive and just bought 2 or 3 practical, multipurpose guns. I would have saved alot of money.

But then again, there is just something about a fully stocked gun safe that gives you a nice warm feeling! :D

Kimber45acp
December 14, 2009, 11:47 AM
This thread is funny. Yes, most of us do talk like we can afford all sorts of guns, and/or like we HAVE spent tens of thousands on guns over the years (:uhoh: ), and the dirty little secret that isn't discussed is that quite a few people right here on THR really ARE quite wealthy. There's a false assumption of equality among us on this board sometimes because we're all gun nuts. The reality is that many of us are poor, can barely afford the mortgage, and have funnelled WAAAAY too much $$ to guns over the years, many of us are middle class and have funnelled way to much $$ to guns over the years, and several people here are so loaded with stacks of hundred dollar bills, house servants, and sports cars, that they KNOW many wouldn't talk to them if we knew (hence the reason they keep quiet about their multiple mansions/$100,000 cars/mini yachts/stacks of transferable NFA items, even though it shows through sometimes).

Creature
December 14, 2009, 11:52 AM
It's all about priorities

That's it in a nutshell.

ny32182
December 14, 2009, 12:08 PM
Slow and steady.

I guess part of the reason I seem to end up with AR15's is that you can get a lower one month, an upper the next month; internals the month after that, etc...

I don't really "budget"; I just have some simple financial rules that keep me out of debt, saving, and hopefully buying guns. These rules are universal for me, and I never break them for any reason, EVER, period:

1) I divert my % each month automatically to savings. This never hits my checking account, therefore I don't really have the "opportunity" to spend it. Money saved in this manner is designated as savings forever; I don't even own it at all from a spending perspective, as far as I'm concerned.
2) I never carry a credit card balance. I don't pay interest on anything other than a mortgage, including cars. I.e., if I can't afford it, I don't buy it, or I save up checking account balance until I can afford it.
3) Therefore, the part that hits my bank account, I don't feel guilty about having fun with. I pay my house, bills, food/other living expenses out of this, and whatever is left I have fun with; which usually turns out to be mostly gun money.

Golf? Heh... Yes, I play golf too; not real seriously, but even if I was: A really nice set of golf clubs is, say, $1500, and greens fees on a nice course are around $50-70... golf is basically trivial compared to the cost of a "nice" gun collection, even for moderately serious players. Like anything else, if golf is what you want to do, you can spend as much as you want on it through travelling all over the place to play, buying the best gear and lessons on the market, etc. *Anything* can be as expensive as you want it to be if you are serious enough about it.

If I had the money I'd be into toy cars, but, I don't.

oneounceload
December 14, 2009, 12:20 PM
One does not need to be a millionaire to afford entry-level O/U shotguns like Browning or Berettas in the 3,000 range, or even mid-range guns like Perazzi or Kreighoffs in the 8-10,000 dollar range. If it is something you are going to shoot... A LOT.....then buying the best quality gun is the cheapest part of the equation. Quality guns, like anything else, will last longer, need fewer repairs, and give greater joy with better resale - actually costing less over a period of years.

You're better off, IMO, having only a few well-made guns that you shoot a lot and have no problems with, than have a safe full of junky guns that don't fit right, you're not totally in love with, keep needing repairs and depreciate too quickly.

While guns and shooting aren't cheap, compared to some other hobbies/pasttimes, it can be - depends on your priorities and wants and needs.

While I have a few guns for SD/HD, 90% are for fun and hunting - mostly fun. YOU need to decide that for yourself. And I also wouldn't worry about trying to "keep up with the Jonses" because there ARE some wealthy folks here, and some not as fortunate - so what?

jh9x18ky
December 14, 2009, 12:27 PM
Cant speak for everyone, but I am far from wealthy. I have accumulated a few firearms over the years, but have had to sacrifice in other ways to own them. I dont have to have $40 jeans or $80 shoes..... dont need $100 sunglasses or $300 coats.... havent taken many $1000 vacations or trips.. would much rather keep some cash in my hand, and own a few firearms instead. We all have hobbies, or other indulgences... my weakness happens to be shooting, reloading, guns.

John Wayne
December 14, 2009, 01:31 PM
It really is all about priorities. By eliminating what the typical person spends on fast food in a week (at 1 meal per day, average), you can have yourself a decent working handgun, rifle, shotgun, or rimfire rifle in under a month.

At an average of $10 a day, for say, a fast food combo then soda and bag of chips at the vending machine at work, you can save $70 a week. That's $280 a month.

For $280 you can get:

S&W model 64 .38 special 4" SS revolver from J&G sales ($189)
Mauser in 7x57 from J&G ($99)
Mosin Nagant from just about anywhere ($100)
S&W Sigma 9mm or .40 from Academy Sports ($249 after rebate)
CZ 82 in 9x18 Makarov off Gunbroker ($250+)
Romanian TTC Tokarev in 7.62x25 ($199) from J&G
Marlin Model 60 .22LR from WalMart ($110)
Ruger 10/22 from WalMart ($180)

The list goes on...I am not wealthy either, but came to realize that if I was going to spend money, I would rather make good investments. Eating out all the time and drinking at bars instead of at home will blow through your savings like nobody's business. If you put all that money toward quality firearms, you have something to show for it, and your purchases will likely increase in value.

John Wayne
December 14, 2009, 01:33 PM
Also, your perceptions of people's wealth are probably a little unfounded. Yes, there are many members on this board that post pictures of multiple firearms worth thousands of dollars each. That's not surprising, given the multitude of members.

However, there are many, many more who don't own as many guns. These guys probably don't post as much either so you see less of that side.

svaz
December 14, 2009, 01:39 PM
I don't have digital. I don't have diddly squat. It's not having what you want. It's wanting what you've got.

Save for and get what you like and in a mere half-a-lifetime you'll be the grumpy old 'gun guy' with the trillions in hardware, too*. :neener:









*Assuming our liberties last that long.

JJE
December 14, 2009, 01:39 PM
"You people must be millionaires."

That's what I think whenever someone posts that they shoot a lot but don't reload.

I'm a low-volume, high-frequency shooter/reloader (3 times a month, maybe 100 rounds per trip, 1/2 rimfire). I haven't bought a gun in a year because I've been spending all my play money on rimfire ammo and reloading components. Loading for my current guns (about a dozen total) and trying to shoot them all semi-regularly has totally kept my mind off new guns (and improved my shooting). Also, I can't see myself adding a new caliber to the mix - stocking a whole new line of loading components is out of the question - too much $$$ and not enough room to store it.

Sam1911
December 14, 2009, 01:48 PM
I find the more I shoot, the less I desire a huge stable of other guns. My wants list seems to reduce each year to one or two guns I think I have a need for and then a huge list of "nice to pick up someday" guns that are interesting but I have no need for.

My ammo budget is many times my guns budget. I could stop shooting, practicing, and competing, and buy five or six VERY nice guns each year. Or, shoot what I have, and what I like, and develop my skills instead of my collection -- adding a new gun only after much consideration and only to fill a clear and reasonable need.

Also, I can't see myself adding a new caliber to the mix - stocking a whole new line of loading components is out of the question - too much $$$ and not enough room to store it.

This was brought home to me this year. I was very fortunate to win a 9mm pistol in a match drawing. Never had a 9mm before, but I've been eyeing them for ammo cost savings.

That was in June. By Christmas I finally expect to have collected the parts and components to reload for it. Up to this point I've just not had the spare cash to buy the dies and press conversion items, and have borrowed time on friends' presses to make the (relatively small) amounts of ammo I've put through it.

Patience.

-Sam

General Geoff
December 14, 2009, 01:50 PM
I bought my first gun in 2004, and started really getting into shooting in 2006 (I turned 21 in december of '05). (owned one gun before that, a $90 M44 Mosin Nagant carbine). Since then I've acquired 12 more guns, so I have 13 total; last count, the value of my collection is about $7000, which brings the average cost of each firearm to ~$538. Not exactly millionaire territory there. :)

I have everything from the $90 Mosin, to my $1400 M1A, and all costs in between. When you're serious about shooting, the guns aren't the expensive part anyway.

It's the ammo. :D

230therapy
December 14, 2009, 01:57 PM
Save up and get the gun you want.

You are not unarmed now and the SKS will serve you well. Therefore, there is no hurry. $50 here and there adds up over months. Figure out what you want (gun, mags, accessories, slings, etc), build a budget and buy it when you have the cash. It may take longer, but you'll be more satisfied knowing there's no debt to pay off at some crazy interest rate.

General Geoff
December 14, 2009, 02:00 PM
Yeah, I forgot to mention. The advice from others in this thread rings especially true: BUY WITH CASH. Or at the very least, only purchase what you could afford with cash. Going into debt over anything except maybe your first and only gun is a bad idea. The first is an exception (in my opinion) because having a means to defend yourself is something over which it is worth going into a bit of debt.

svaz
December 14, 2009, 02:01 PM
"Fear the man who owns but one gun - he probably knows how to use it."


Honestly, I can't believe the thread has gone this long without anyone quoting that. :p

Creature
December 14, 2009, 02:03 PM
Fear the man who owns but one gun - he probably knows how to use it.

Not so much these days...

MetalHead
December 14, 2009, 02:05 PM
What I have has taken 31 years, some years I buy several but many years nada. My rule of thumb, keep $200-300 on you at all times, you might never know when a bargin will pop up, like the SKS-D I owned for a while, at shows they were over $250 when a regular on was half that, this one with surface rust was only $100 cash-n-carry. But I also remember ordering a FN-49 from Paragon and a can of ammo deal where the ammo cost my 4 cents a round! Course that stuff split necks often but nothing dangerous.

youngda9
December 14, 2009, 02:07 PM
reload to save money if you are going to be blazing away with your ak or your ar

Dr.Mall Ninja
December 14, 2009, 02:09 PM
Being a rich gun nut must be cool, we just got this big time apartment landlord that is going to my church, he has a couple civil war guns, and more guns then he can count, as for me the most I've ever had at one time is 3 =(

one more thing, i'm not saying that people who have money dont deserve it.

WhoKnowsWho
December 14, 2009, 02:16 PM
I bought one gun and said "this and one other, and I'll be good". Well, as opportunities for purchase presented themselves and I became more interested in different calibers and styles, I've bought whenever and wherever I could. I like the technology and variety and the entertainment and peace of mind it provides. I also figure that if something catastrophic happens to my financial state, I can sell off a lot to keep me going for a little while but keep a few that I want to keep.

At an average of $10 a day, for say, a fast food combo then soda and bag of chips at the vending machine at work, you can save $70 a week. That's $280 a month.

John Wayne, that's always a good point to make. It adds up fast.

I used to go to work, and do the math for how many more hours I would have to work to get the money to buy certain items, it took me awhile to see how many hours of work I was spending to feed myself and other things that could be on a reduced spending diet.

CoRoMo
December 14, 2009, 02:16 PM
Far from it.

But Dad taught me how to avoid debt, pinch a penny, and stretch a dollar. I married a bargain hunting queen, and I'm a pack-rat of Biblical proportions.:D

So now I have a lot of stuff, but it took years to get here.

Dokkalfar
December 14, 2009, 02:19 PM
Yep, most of us arent even close :( Im still working my way through college, and all I've got is a $500 rifle, a pair of .22s (up to $150 each) and my first one, a $200 Mossberg 500. And my old $10 BB gun from when I was 7 or 8. Add in the cost of the ammo I've got in stock, and I don't even break $2k.

As much as I'd love to get, say, a Barrett REC7, I'm dedicating more $$ to a vehicle/school. The main reason I only make it out to the range 2-3 times a month. Even if .22s are only $13.90 for 525 at Academy's, you still go through 100s or 1000s of them each time you go out. Luckily there's a range near my house that's only $10 for a lifetime range card, and $10 a day thereafter, so range fees aren't bad at all :D

As to debt, I don't even have a credit card, though I need to get one to build credit as having a 9003 rating means its harder to get student loans, or vehicle financing. So, I'm planning on just making enough purchases to keep maintain a balance, then leaving the card at home. Less temptation that way

So, now I'm just waiting till I win the lottery. Though my chances'd probly improve if I actually bought a ticket...

Dr.Rob
December 14, 2009, 02:28 PM
Some of us have been at this hobby for well over 20 years. You figure if you ONLY spent $500 a year on firearms in that time you could have a collection worth ten grand. $500 isn't a lot to save in a single year JUST for your hobby.

KBintheSLC
December 14, 2009, 02:28 PM
I fear the man with only one gun. Why? Because it is very likely that he knows how to use it. I have seen some guys with some pretty ridiculous gun arsenals out there (over 50 guns)... more guns than they could ever find time to shoot regularly. I think that having 1 rifle, 1 shotgun, and 1 pistol is probably all of the guns you could ever really need. Anything beyond that is little more than a luxury.

Mike J
December 14, 2009, 02:29 PM
I'm definitely not a millionaire. This has been a lean year for me but we are getting by. I wont be buying any more guns until things look better. Thats okay though because I basically have what I need. What I have now has been accumalated over the last 21 years. I only have 11 firearms. Each one has it's purpose & it's place. If you want to be able to get some cheap range time I would suggest digging around the pawn shops for a Marlin model 60. Then if you get a bulk pack of ammo you can plink a lot for not much money. Then shoot a couple of magazines through the SKS just to stay in touch with it.

freakshow10mm
December 14, 2009, 02:29 PM
Personally, I have two guns. One carry gun and the shotgun my grandfather bought me for my first gun when I was 12yo (now 28).

ny32182
December 14, 2009, 02:34 PM
Maybe OT, but you don't need to carry a balance on a credit card to use it to build credit. Just having one without any late payments on the record is what counts. The longer the history, the better. You can buy some gas or whatever on it once a month, pay the bill at the end of the month, and build credit without ever paying a dime in interest.

If you are in college, definitely get a credit card, apply the mentioned technique, and it will help your credit score considerably when you are looking at mortgages or whatever after college.

Ester IX:XVI
December 14, 2009, 02:44 PM
I'm not a millionare, barley a thousandare. Last spring i sold a pistol then hoarded away $10 a week till i had the money for a negelected 870. Cleaned it up and am proud of it.111017

111018

Bobarino
December 14, 2009, 03:01 PM
like most, i'm far from a millionaire. i own 8 guns in 7 calibers. it took me 15 years to get that far. some are dirt cheap like the $139 WalMart Marlin 60. some are pretty spendy like a $2k tricked out AR and everything else is somewhere in between. i only pay cash so it's not often i get to buy a new gun. i have to plan ahead and save for quite a while and add do-dads to them as i can afford them. i like quality over quantity. there are really only two more guns i want for me to consider my small collection to be complete.

one big thing that helps in my case is that i'm not married and don't have kids. i like it that way and it's going to stay that way. i have lots of hobbies and kids are pretty detrimental to that. i already know i'd make a lousy dad but i make great shooter! i have lots of nephews to pass the shooting on to.

one thing that struck me wrong was that golf is a rich man's game. far from it!! i golf too and build my own clubs. i have a custom set made by me and for me that came in under $400. i don't play courses that are over $50/round.

sure there are plenty of people here that have a lot of money to spend on their firearms and more power to them! it's very likely they've worked hard for it and earned it. i know i have. most of us have built up our collections over the course of many years. sure i'd love to wander down to Cabela's and go on a shopping spree but it's just not in the cards as of yet.

Bobby

skwab
December 14, 2009, 03:06 PM
Nope - not a millionaire here either. I've spent the last few years building up a collection, partly because I enjoy it, and I have a wife that enjoys it as well, so it's something we do together which is a lot of fun. So between the two of us, we've spent a few dollars on guns over the last several years as we have gotten more into it, and have found some decent deals at gun shows and online here and there. But it's something that happens over time.

This hobby is like any other - you will have those whose trigger finger will never graze anything less than a high end HK, and you have those who are just as happy with their hand-me-down .22 rifle. You need to figure out what you want out of it and not worry about what others are doing - shoot what you can, and if there's something you want, figure out a way to get it.

BUT - like others have said, don't go into debt for it. That's a slippery slope, because a gun is not cheap - you have to feed the dam things every time you go out, accessories, cleaning supplies etc. It's easy to just charge all this stuff on a card and forget about it - it's not worth it - make a list of what you want, and decide how to get it. But just have fun with it!

eye5600
December 14, 2009, 03:11 PM
Keep in mind that the folks on THR, or any similar computer site, are a self-selected group that not only like guns, but like talking about guns on the internet. There are lots of guys who shoot or hunt but have no interest in the internet. It stands to reason that the really zealous gun nuts are more common here than in the population at large.

Time of life can make a big difference in how you think about money. If you are in your 20's, at the beginning of a career, maybe newly married, maybe a new parent, then every $100 that comes into the household is pre-assigned to pay some bill or other. But if you have paid that last college bill and the property tax is more than the mortgage, then freeing up some funds for a new 1911 is not such a big deal.

9MMare
December 14, 2009, 03:11 PM
I'm still fairly new to guns and came here to learn about shooting, rather than guns.

I was surprised to find that more people seem to collect than shoot (or at least have way more guns than they can & do shoot). Luckily, I have not been bitten by that bug, yet.

I was also surprised at how expensive ammo is...I thought I was getting into a fairly cheap new sport, after my initial gun purchase. As a new shooter, I do need to practice, practice, practice.

So I have 3 local WalMarts on speed-dial and spend some time looking for 9mm bargains.

Do I have lots of extra cash to play in this new sport? Nope. I'd LOVE a smaller 9mm to carry more easily, with a laser grip...but it's not in the cards right now.

What I need is a big gorgeous pickup truck...and I cant afford that either because I will not take on those monthly payments. Aside from my mortgage, I avoid stuff like that as much as possible. Oh well.

Ryder
December 14, 2009, 03:13 PM
Rich? :scrutiny: If I divided the number of guns I own into my age I wouldn't have one for every other year of my life. Not rich, just old and wise. You gotta have a plan and patience to let it work for you.

I have money to buy things because I've refused to live in debt for starters. The guns I own can probably be accounted for with the money I haven't paid in interest over my lifetime. I don't buy things I can make myself but when I do I get the best so it will last, not disposable junk that needs replacing every couple years. I reload my own ammo, I grow food, I do my own remodeling, and fix my own cars.

I have an SKS also. It was obtained in trade for a black powder rifle that I received by saving up coupons. It only cost me a stamp to mail them in :neener:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v169/Venomenon/Gunz/blackgun.jpg

9MMare
December 14, 2009, 03:13 PM
i have lots of hobbies and kids are pretty detrimental to that.


High five!

Walkalong
December 14, 2009, 03:23 PM
some guys with some pretty ridiculous gun arsenals out there (over 50 guns)... Buy 2 guns a year for 25 years and there you go. Many here have been buying guns longer than that. Shoot two each week and that gets em all shot in a years time. :)

Walkalong
December 14, 2009, 03:24 PM
It stands to reason that the really zealous gun nuts are more common here than in the population at large.Only natural. Birds of a feather and all that.

EdLaver
December 14, 2009, 03:27 PM
I use all my free money that I dont spend on bills, food, and gas on firearms. I love to shoot them, train with them, collect them. It has become my primary hobby. I don't have the latest fashionable clothing or the fastest sport's car. I dont have the latest tech gadgets, just the basics and what I need. My wife gets all the other stuff :)

thorazine
December 14, 2009, 03:29 PM
You people must be millionaires

Or have high limits on credit cards. :D

mcdonl
December 14, 2009, 03:32 PM
I use all my free money that I dont spend on bills, food, and gas on firearms. I love to shoot them, train with them, collect them. It has become my primary hobby. I don't have the latest fashionable clothing or the fastest sport's car. I dont have the latest tech gadgets, just the basics and what I need. My wife gets all the other stuff

Thats me! Trading other toys, odd jobs and travel reimbursements from work fund my hobbies.

McCall911
December 14, 2009, 03:37 PM
Not really. I don't even have a million dollars in my old Monopoly set! :D

NWCP
December 14, 2009, 03:59 PM
Many of us have been buying our guns for over 20 years, or more, not all at once. Add to that the shooting sports happens to be one of our favorite pastimes. My family doesn't do without so I can purchase a pistol, or rifle and my wife enjoys shooting as well.

CWL
December 14, 2009, 04:19 PM
Been shooting for 26 years now, even though I have many firearms and now collect full house customs, I have spent many times more on ammo than my firearms. I've also spent as much on training as I have firearms.

Maybe you own a Harley, I've always wanted one but could never justify buying one. Different people have different priorities.

ArfinGreebly
December 14, 2009, 04:22 PM
Yeah. Don't I wish.

I'll tell you what, though, if I had taken one half the amount we lost on remodeling our last home and spent that on guns and a vehicle, I'd have a new paid-for 4x4 truck, a decent safe, and at least five times as many guns as I do now.

Every so often I contemplate what else that money could have bought.

There's simply no substitute for knowing what you own is paid for.

jim in Anchorage
December 14, 2009, 04:43 PM
I'll tell you what, though, if I had taken one half the amount we lost on remodeling our last home and spent that on guns and a vehicle, I'd have a new paid-for 4x4 truck, a decent safe, and at least five times as many guns as I do now.

That must have been some remodeling job.
I pretty much have the same story as the earlier posters- my collection is a result of 40 years of buying a gun every so often. Over time they add up. Could I afford to replace them? Sure, in another 40 years

theotherwaldo
December 14, 2009, 04:48 PM
-Been accumulating 'em steadily since the early '70's. One at a time. Now I've got more guns than years.

I figure that guns are fun in good times, an anchor to windward in bad times, and something to put in the community pot in GTH times.

Thank G-d for layaway!

cjl8651
December 14, 2009, 04:50 PM
Investment returns (over the long-term) = gun money.

NMGonzo
December 14, 2009, 04:52 PM
I want an SKS now.

Dammit!

X-Rap
December 14, 2009, 04:53 PM
A lot of guys my age golf and have Harleys, I hunt and fish and shoot guns. That and chasing women is almost as expensive as catching one, or losing one. Ask Tiger Woods about that.

Floppy_D
December 14, 2009, 05:16 PM
Keep putting $20 bills in the cookie jar when you can, and keep an eye on the classifieds, craigslists and estate sales. Your collection will get big fairly quick.

codyd
December 14, 2009, 05:23 PM
im pretty young. like, caint buy handguns young. and i read a lot and try to learn as much as possible, not just about the firearms, but also,the laws and responsibilities that come with them. Every chance i get, I take my friends shooting with me and my family so they can learn about firearms and safe handling. ive been EXTREMELY fortunate in what ive learned and try to spread it to people my age because its a whole new generation of gunowners and thats the only thing protecting gun rights in the future. one of the most important things ive learned from older people and even members of this forum is that its not always the guns that you have, its just the fact that you do own one and have that right. and besides, when you can only buy one gun, you tend to find the one that suits you and your needs the best. id rather have one gun and a thousand rounds than a thousand guns with a few rounds.

the_right_reverend
December 14, 2009, 05:28 PM
I am not a millionaire ........

I have check to MIDWAYUSA, check to grafs, check to buds, check to MidSouth

pocket money goes to the local outfitters

iiibdsiil
December 14, 2009, 05:32 PM
I think it's just like any other drug habit... If you are really into it, you make it happen to get what you want. You cut back on other things that aren't as important to you.

It gets bad when you have multiple things that are all the same. Like cars, guns, computers, tools, and now mountain biking... Then they all suffer as a result of each other. Oh well, food can always wait.

oneounceload
December 14, 2009, 05:34 PM
some guys with some pretty ridiculous gun arsenals out there (over 50 guns)...

that's not an arsenal - it's the beginning of a decent gun collection - this is starting to sound more like whining about wealth envy than anything else.

Personally, I could care less how many anyone else has, or how much they cost......and I know some personal friends with some expensive tastes, including one who bought three shotguns this years - spending about $75,000 for them - good for him, he has the disposable income for it; and if I had the same, I probably would do it also.

I have other friends who have 2 or 3 safes full (I'm talking those 52-gun Browning safes)....again - good for them.

Personally - I would rather own, as I said before, about 4-6 long guns that were all made to my specifications than have a large collection of inexpensive guns I don't shoot. (family heirloom-types excepted)

To each his/her own and their wallet.

jim in Anchorage
December 14, 2009, 05:38 PM
im pretty young. like, caint buy handguns young. and i read a lot and try to learn as much as possible, not just about the firearms, but also,the laws and responsibilities that come with them. Every chance i get, I take my friends shooting with me and my family so they can learn about firearms and safe handling. ive been EXTREMELY fortunate in what ive learned and try to spread it to people my age because its a whole new generation of gunowners and thats the only thing protecting gun rights in the future. one of the most important things ive learned from older people and even members of this forum is that its not always the guns that you have, its just the fact that you do own one and have that right. and besides, when you can only buy one gun, you tend to find the one that suits you and your needs the best. id rather have one gun and a thousand rounds than a thousand guns with a few rounds.
We have a winner:)

SSN Vet
December 14, 2009, 05:38 PM
I've paid social security taxes every year since I was eleven years old...

When my dorm buddies were tailgating at the football games, I had my head burried into books in the engineering library.

For eight years in the Navy, I scrimped and saved... and I squirreled away all of my bonus money, so I could by a piece of land.

I was 31 years old before I purchased my first new car and it was a Ford Escort...

I built my house with my own two hands and ten years later is still not really done...

I've gone without both cable t.v. and a satelite dish for 20 years.

I pay >$12K out of pocket every year for health insurance...

And now, finally, after selling the family camp and some of our land, I have a little disposable income...

Somehow, this isn't what I thought being a millionaire was going to feel like :neener:

Cosmoline
December 14, 2009, 05:41 PM
The only way I can do it is by ruthlessly selling or trading off any firearms I'm not using. These then fund the next purchase.

That and I don't own a car and haven't had to buy a gallon of gas since 2006.

Arkansas Paul
December 14, 2009, 05:50 PM
I was a millionaire for a short time and had all the guns I ever wanted. Then the damn alarm clock went off. Seriously though, I doubt 5% of the members here are wealthy. They just accumulated a nice collection over time. I am married with a 6 year old and am a full time student. Needless to say, there's not a lot of spare cash around my house right now. I just save up to get what I'm wanting, and sometimes that takes a long time. That just makes it that much sweeter. I have 11 right now and none of them are really expensive. The highest priced one was only $655 and that's with the scope. One thing I refuse to do is buy one with a credit card. I don't even have one. If I can't buy it or save up for it I don't need it. That's just me.

guntech59
December 14, 2009, 05:58 PM
I buy during the good times and sometimes have to sell when money gets tight.

I just sold a couple good ones to get ahead on my winter heating bill.

I don't own any high dollar or collectable firearms. They are all working guns. They are all disposable except for three or four that I use for defense or hunting. They all function well and are accurate (what's the point of owning an inaccurate gun?).

Maybe $3000 total investment, bought over a period of 12 years or so, not counting the few that I lost custody of in my '97 divorce.

Golden_006
December 14, 2009, 06:06 PM
Been shooting for 26 years now, even though I have many firearms and now collect full house customs, I have spent many times more on ammo than my firearms. I've also spent as much on training as I have firearms.

Maybe you own a Harley, I've always wanted one but could never justify buying one. Different people have different priorities.

This is true, I do own a Harley ironhead at least. It's an old though; only cost me $3000 but I had to put about 600 in it; including doing some of the work on it myself. it just seems like the SKS was so utilititarian or something; until I finally got around to shooting it did I realize that it was a force. Feels like i can hammer nails with it all day and be dropped off in combat situation in Baghdad or the North pole and still be fine.

Nicky Santoro
December 14, 2009, 06:15 PM
You people must be millionaires

A lot of people here are older and are playing the back nine. Our kids are through school, our houses are paid off, and we finally have the resources to indulge ourselves a bit. Other than getting up four times at night to pee, it's not a bad time of life.

Grassman
December 14, 2009, 06:17 PM
I'm a middle class self employed guy, been around guns most of my life. I only have about 10 guns. Last week I did purchase a Bushmaster AR-15, like most average guys I saved every spare dollar I could to get it, took a few months but I did. I go pick it up on Wednesday.:D Just save your change and don't spend it on crap.

JamisJockey
December 14, 2009, 06:19 PM
Okay, lets say the average gun is $500. If you save $41.66 a month for a year, you've got $500 for that gun. In 5 or 6 years, you've got 5 or 6 guns.
None of my current guns cost $500. Counting up all the guns I own, and have owned and sold, the value of all of them total is less than $6,000. Right now, I own less than $2,000 worth of guns and I own 7, plus a muzzle loader.
In the recent Dick's sporting goods flier, there were several hunting rifles, shotguns, and .22 rifles under $400.

$41.66 a month. I probably blow that on Starbucks and 7-11 slurpees.
Dial back your cable package. Drop the text messaging and picture messaging from you cellphone plan. Cut $51.66 out of your buget and you'll have $500 for a gun, and $120 for a case of ammo at the end of the year.

Guns aren't expensive. My expensive hobby floats.

Also, guns are like stock: Buy low, sell high. You better damn well believe I ain't paying market value for any guns, I will hunt for a deal before I'll purchase in this market.

Grassman
December 14, 2009, 06:24 PM
My most expensive hobby floats also. I could have an arsenal what I pay there every month.

Officers'Wife
December 14, 2009, 06:25 PM
I just have a quarter interest in an Indiana farm so I guess that means I'm only a quarter broke. The weapons I have are all gifts received from either my grandfather, father or uncle. The other weapons in the house are the ones my husband managed to buy on his wages as an army officer. Our weapons and ammunition are not very high on our priority list but higher than many other things important to the average citizen.

JamisJockey
December 14, 2009, 06:30 PM
Grassman:

Hijacking the thread here :) Where do you boat and what do you have? I've got an '07 Trophy and fish the Chesapeake, plus play time on the Potomac.

http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y88/Atc1man/New%20Boat/6-25-089.jpg

To keep it kind of on topic, I usually take the revolver with me just in case, but I don't quite have room for anything larger.

ny32182
December 14, 2009, 06:32 PM
Oh... I spot a millionaire!

Gunfighter123
December 14, 2009, 06:34 PM
Hello Golden,
Nah --- not even close to a millionaire --- BUT , I got my first firearm before I was 12 , I'm now 52 --- thats 40 years of owning firearms --- I bet , in my two gun safes -- I got a firearm for every one of them 40 years !!!!
That being said ---- I don't drink {anymore} , don't use drugs , have the same wife for 30+ years , and I drive a 1997 Chevy Lumina !!!!
In my 20s --- I had a bunch of "hot rods" --- 72 Olds 442 , 67/68/69 Cameros , Firebirds , Trans Ams ,GTOs etc. --- I also liked to go to bars , horse/dog races , and competion shooting.
Now , I just like to go to Action type matches in my 97 Chevy !!!

crankyoldlady
December 14, 2009, 06:41 PM
It's all about choices.

My neighbor gets her hair and nails done every week. My husband and I cut each others hair.

We seldom eat out, don't have any premium cable channels, and I buy my jeans at a thrift store. I bought an inexpensive used vehicle nine years ago. I'll drive it another five years or more.

It's all about choices.

JamisJockey
December 14, 2009, 06:41 PM
Ha! Far from it. We make enough to pay the bills and have a few toys. You certainly don't have to be a millionaire to have fun. Hell, my boat cost less than alot of people's cars, and you can finance a boat for longer since they last longer.

Grassman
December 14, 2009, 06:44 PM
JamisJocky...don't have any pics but I have a 36ft. Silverton cruiser. Just sold my center console fishing boat, looking for another one. Ever heard of Lake Texoma in Texas?

billsnogo
December 14, 2009, 06:45 PM
It is no different than my other main hobby, muscle cars. There are people who I KNOW are millionaires, but that doesn't stop us from enjoying the same hobby, they just get the benefit of not having to wait to save up for the next part/gun that you have been focused on.

I only buy what I can pay cash for, much less since I have been unemployed, but that will change (hopefully sooner rather than later), and that has limited me as to what I own, but what I own, I enjoy and don't worry about the credit card bill in the mail :D

Give it time, you will get a small collection going, and realize not everyone (me included.... unfortunately) can not go blow through thousands of rounds a month. I still enjoy the hobby though.

ps
Now I am getting into the reloading side to help reduce the cost of my ammunition (but as they say, you don't save money, you just shoot more), but am interested in making the reloading another side of this hobby to enjoy that will allow me to spend less while waiting for more income, but widen my knowledge of the hobby. ;)

bill (has no idea what he just typed, I tend to ramble on and not make much sense :rolleyes: )

JamisJockey
December 14, 2009, 06:47 PM
I have. Used to live in Beaumont. Trying to line up the ducks so we can move back to Texas, looking at the suburbs west or south of Houston right now. Hoping to be closer to the salt where I can put some beeg Texas fish in the boat :)


Ps: Shooting and hunting are not my primary passion.

BULLSI
December 14, 2009, 06:48 PM
Im a millionaire and even having as much money as I do it is just as expensive for me to buy ammo as yourselves.


That is why I hire some people to go to the range to do my shooting for me. Its just cheaper that way.

I just ask them if I had fun and they say yeah, I say good, that is about it.

Erik M
December 14, 2009, 07:15 PM
I bought an AR15 because I received a $1200.00 Christmas bonus. It pays to go to College. It also pays to work for Federal Defense Contractors.

Big Russ
December 14, 2009, 07:23 PM
I bought my AR-15 after months of saving. Most of my other guns come 2nd hand, pawn shops, family members, friends, etc. If there's any way I can get to an inexpensive and quality firearm I'll jump on it. Like the old laptop I traded for 3 shotguns, that felt like a heck of a bargain.

oneounceload
December 14, 2009, 07:25 PM
It also pays to work for Federal Defense Contractors.

Then you should have gotten it for free!!!!...... :D

mcdonl
December 14, 2009, 07:41 PM
That is why I hire some people to go to the range to do my shooting for me. Its just cheaper that way

Where do I send my resume? :)

Erik M
December 14, 2009, 08:04 PM
I should have worded my comment to say that I work for everything I own, most of my guns I traded other guns for.

oldman1946
December 14, 2009, 08:23 PM
All I have is an SKS that I bought in the Obama scare for $360, and the only other thing I could find that was that cheap and good, was a Yugo one for $260.

The yugo was sold before I could buy it and I heard the Romy's are better anyway; plus you get a chrome lined barrel that I was happy about since I wouldn't know how to clean it/ I can shoot cheap ammo and not worry about it.

And speaking of ammo, is Caballas sale on 7.62x39 really a good deal at 130 dollars for 500rnds? You can get brown bear for 20 bucks cheaper at Cheaper Than Dirt any time. Although the cabellas is a better grade . . . still I need money for other things but I'm down to 3 boxes. Is that pretty much the going rate for ammo? Seems like every trip to the range will cost you more than golf; a rich persons leisure pursuit if ever was one. Not that I know anything about golf . . .


I have an above avg income and debt free for the last 12 yrs. Yet I cringe when I buy a nice gun. I have a lot of guns but they are an investment for me. I have guns I paid less than $200 for in the 70s and now worth $800. I bought a nice Colt AR a few years ago new for $300 and now I could sell it used for over $1200. Take 200 guns and sell them in my retirement years for say $600 each and you have $120,000 tax free dollars made from investing a few dollars in guns over the years. Guns are not like cars or women, they increase in value while not having any upkeep. I try to buy 4-8 guns a year and have since the mid 60's. Many I buy are used that are being sold by people needing money for other things.

As to ammo, buy it on-line in bulk. ABout the least I will buy at one time is 500 rounds but I can find it on sale and get it less than half the local store price.

iScream
December 14, 2009, 08:24 PM
The IRS apparently thinks my wife and I are quite wealthy. We are far, far from being rich but we made a life decision not to have children. That goes a long way toward buying toys, especially since we both have pretty good jobs. My wife spends most of her personal money on her horse while I spend mine on guns or whatever.

We're fortunate but I promise you that I have worked my butt off over the years. Most of the time when I'm logged on here, I also have a software or database development environment open and I'm knocking out a few lines of code for work.

I also traded my EB Explorer in for a basic Ford Ranger a few years ago. Just decided I wanted the extra monthly payment money for hobby stuff instead of a fancy SUV.

-Chris

telomerase
December 14, 2009, 08:33 PM
And now, finally, after selling the family camp and some of our land, I have a little disposable income...

Somehow, this isn't what I thought being a millionaire was going to feel like

Just wait a couple years and we'll all be billionaires (http://www.southafrica.to/transport/Airlines/cheapest-flight-survey/2009/Zimbabwe-currency.jpg).

iScream
December 14, 2009, 08:52 PM
I thought some of you might find a picture of the corner of my desk humorous. Or not.

THR on one monitor, Microsoft SQL Server Management Studio on the other, a half assembled XDm and a cup of the lifeblood.

-Chris

http://www.tennvalleyit.com/images/desk1.jpg

docsleepy
December 14, 2009, 09:03 PM
If you read the fascinating book "The Millionaire Next Door" it says the majority of millionaires (there are several million of them in the United States) did it the hard way. And most of them clip coupons, live in a modest house, drive a used car, wear modest clothes.

The way you get there is by NOT SPENDING.


Save a MINIMUM of 11% of your gross income every year and invest it in the stock market, diversified. If buying guns or ammo is going to dent that 11%, then I'd say do the 11% FIRST and LATER buy the gun/ammo.

I reload because
a) it makes me save money,
b) it makes me shoot LESS, which goes back to (a)
c) I have much more fun that way.

Firearms are by FAR my cheapest hobby. Boat/airplane are much more expensive, but I live on a BUDGET BUDGET BUDGET and spending CASH out of your back pocket rather than using plastic will cut your spending by 30%....which is enough to fund that retirement.

Live like no one else NOW, so you can live like no one else LATER, too!

DammitBoy
December 14, 2009, 09:13 PM
I've been collecting guns for over forty years since my big brother gave me my first one.

My collection gained 9 more when my dad passed away - which I'd gladly trade back for more time with him.

I work three jobs. One to pay the bills, one to put in the savings account, and one to support my gun collecting, shooting, hunting addiction.

I have zero credit card debt. I pay cash for everything I own. I'm not a millionaire, but because I'm also not a dope - I was able to spend about 5k on some great deals this year.

I've never paid full price for any gun I ever bought and I've never traded or sold one that didn't make me a profit.

NMGonzo
December 14, 2009, 09:16 PM
The IRS apparently thinks my wife and I are quite wealthy. We are far, far from being rich but we made a life decision not to have children. That goes a long way toward buying toys, especially since we both have pretty good jobs. My wife spends most of her personal money on her horse while I spend mine on guns or whatever.

-Chris

ah ... forgot to mention the 'no children'.

don't have any

oneounceload
December 14, 2009, 09:16 PM
Guns are not like cars or women, they increase in value while not having any upkeep.

When you factor in inflation, you have lost money unless you have invested in high dollar one-of-a-kind guns in the 50-100K range - and even that can be iffy. You would be better off investing smartly in the stock market over time - that has been proven over and over again

NMGonzo
December 14, 2009, 09:17 PM
The only way I can do it is by ruthlessly selling or trading off any firearms I'm not using. These then fund the next purchase.

That and I don't own a car and haven't had to buy a gallon of gas since 2006.
Bicycles can get expensive.

MattTheHat
December 14, 2009, 09:19 PM
I'm not a millionaire, I just have my priorities straight. See, first you buy your guns and accoutrements, and then, if there's anything else left, you get to eat.

It ain't rocket science, friends. :)


-Matt

DammitBoy
December 14, 2009, 09:20 PM
When I told my teenage daughter that her new tires on her car cost me a new pistol - she just rolled her eyes.

That girl has cost me an entire arsenal! :D

MIgunguy
December 14, 2009, 09:27 PM
I'm no millionaire, but like someone else mentioned I forgo other things to afford the guns I want. Older car, no fancy clothes, couldn't care less about skis, jet skis, the latest electronics, etc., etc.

mudriver
December 14, 2009, 09:32 PM
I would likely be a millionaire, or at least close, if I didn't have a wife! But I digress.

Seriously, my two young boys save their money they get for their bday (from inlaws) and have scored 2 great guns each for less than $100 per gun in the last 2 years. They've learned valuable lessons from all of this:

1. Guns are fun investments
2. Buy important things and not junk
3. Shop around for good deals and negotiate to get a better one!

Pileatus
December 14, 2009, 09:47 PM
I'm not even close to rich. I'm a college kid, so money has never been in abundance. The best I can do is work my tuchus off during breaks, which helps cover my shooting expenses. Nothing I own would turn any heads, unless the person had never heard of Kolar or Kreighoff and though a Remington 1100 was the top of the line!

As everyone here has already said, it's about priorities. Prioritize your hobbies and expenses, and then you can really see what's coming in and going out. The $10 or so for a sandwich, chips and soda at the local deli would have bought two boxes of skeet loads...it's all relative.

22-rimfire
December 14, 2009, 10:06 PM
Just about anyone can be a millionaire if you work at it starting at a young age. Save Save Save!! But it helps to have a good job. You generally get a good job by going to college and making smart decisions. Life is short.

w_houle
December 14, 2009, 10:26 PM
Oh you're funny, most of my guns are pot metal... but I don't give a shi:rolleyes:
I have a few to choose from, and it feels like I have a lot. I rotate through what I shoot, so I don't have safe queens and gives them a rest because I don't want to over do it:D

rogertc1
December 14, 2009, 10:30 PM
Took me 57 years to get to this point. For years I had the guns all over the house. Under beds, in closets, on walls, and lock boxes. My kids all left the nest so I converted one of their rooms into a vault.
The last 4 years I decided I wanted all the guns I had wanted. So with the help of my computer, Buds, and GB I made it happen. Instead of geting 2.5% in the CD's I decided to convert some of them to guns. I have always been a collector displayer. Guns are my love and addiction.
No credit cards, car payments nor house payment. Just Taxes. I don't gamble, eat out much and a vacation to me is staying at home working on one the cars in my collection.
Pictures are a few months old.
http://i28.photobucket.com/albums/c248/rogertc1/mancave1.jpg


http://i28.photobucket.com/albums/c248/rogertc1/mancave2.jpg

Ohio Gun Guy
December 14, 2009, 10:35 PM
I have guns and wood working tools....:D

Both have come from a LONG time in getting a piece here and there. Many of the tools arrive for Christmas, and most of the guns go back to tax rebate checks. If your persistant (Crazy:rolleyes:) you can accumulate things that interest you and have a decent collection / usefull shop after a few years.


If santa is listening..... A lowes card and some ammo would be GREAT.



Rogertc1 - you go in there and just stair at the walls dont you? (I would)

Ridgerunner665
December 14, 2009, 10:39 PM
The secret...

Spend what you can when you can....consistently.

I've been buying guns since I was 9 (with help from Dad and Grandad...till I got old enough to buy them myself)

I'm not rich (I'm just a truck driver, a workin man like everybody else), but I have quite a little collection after 28 years of buying what I wanted when I could afford it.

I still buy a few guns every year....some to trade on, others to keep. Many of mine have never been fired, I only use a few of them...

Same for ammo and components...been stocking up for a while. (at least for the rounds that I use...308, 45acp, 300 Win Mag)

rogertc1
December 14, 2009, 10:56 PM
You are right Ohio Gun Guy. It is really neat to sit and look at all my collection displayed and the memories how I acquired each one.
Beats taking them out of Safes, boxes, closets, under beds, and gun cases. Used to take a hours just to look at some them maybe once a year.

Ohio Gun Guy
December 14, 2009, 10:57 PM
^

Yankee by birth, Northerner by the grace of God :D

ny32182
December 14, 2009, 11:11 PM
iScream, I can definitely appreciate that photo.

roger, hopefully I'll be there after 57 years as well; nice.

browningguy
December 14, 2009, 11:38 PM
Definately not a millionaire, but both my kids have graduated from college!!!

Biggest pay raise I ever got.:neener:

FROGO207
December 14, 2009, 11:47 PM
Rogertc1
You have gotten ahead of me again. I will have to ramp up on the auction time.:D :D Am seriously considering building a safe room then building a garage around it.:cool:

Uncle Mike
December 14, 2009, 11:58 PM
Well, I have a million dollars.......










worth of debt! That's what I tell uncle sam, anyways!

gbran
December 15, 2009, 12:04 AM
I'm not a millionaire, but I am a bit past middle age, fairly comfortable and the biggie? I'm single with no one telling what I can or can't buy.

wrs840
December 15, 2009, 12:16 AM
This is the simple promise of Constitutional-Democracy and Free-Market-Capitalism: If you do your work like you give-a-damn and have-a-clue, and make it past 50 without becoming a customer of the criminal-justice system or getting divorced, you'll likely be rewarded with a large toy-inventory.

Les

DammitBoy
December 15, 2009, 12:54 AM
Hell, I'm divorced twice over and I still have a large toy inventory.

wrs840
December 15, 2009, 01:11 AM
Well.. you must be a millionaire then... :D

Les

theotherwaldo
December 15, 2009, 02:13 AM
Ditto - and everything is paid off except for a bit of the student loans.

-And I'm working on them - maybe I can die a (debt-)free man... .

Dr.Mall Ninja
December 15, 2009, 03:49 AM
roger your my hero

Ala Dan
December 15, 2009, 09:26 AM
Right on, brother~! :D Heck, I haven't brought home a pay check in
5 years [he-he-he]~! :uhoh: :D

inclinebench
December 15, 2009, 09:44 AM
I save as best as I can. I dont buy too often, and since I mostly hunt, what I buy is geared toward that so I dont get too cazy with accessories and add ons. One day I will pay off the house and then I will probably start getting a little more buy-happy.

22-rimfire
December 15, 2009, 10:16 AM
The secret to a large accumulation of firearms is to be consistant and buy a few guns yearly. Don't sell one gun to buy another. It helps to be interested in a certain flavor of firearm as well as that becomes the driving force. Something new.... got to have it.... When you're 60, folks will be saying, wow, how did they buy so many firearms? Simple. Like saving. Make a plan and stick to it.

Legionnaire
December 15, 2009, 10:16 AM
Just like saving for retirement: a little at a time over a long period of time.

lobo9er
December 15, 2009, 10:32 AM
wrs80 got it right

Ky Larry
December 15, 2009, 08:57 PM
It is a matter of priorities. This is what's great about America. We get to choose what we do with our money. If we have it, we can spend it on bass boats, RV's,cameras, travel, electronics, or any of a mulitude of stuff. No, I'm not rich. My wife and I work hard and invest for retirement. We pay our bills and live within our means. If we plan a little and conserve, there's usually a little left over for toys.

Tim the student
December 15, 2009, 09:24 PM
I'm not a millionaire. I'm a 31 year old married guy going to school, care of the VA. But I also don't smoke, go out drinking, go gambling, or buy a lot of needless crap, like soda when I'm at school, or McDonalds. I generally don't eat lunch, and when I do, I pack it from home. Plus, I save other money for toys here and there when I get it.

I have bought some nice guns on return from deployment though, which is something that has certainly helped me.

If you want to be a "millionaire" like me, I hear the Army is hiring. That's how I got my "millions".

warnerwh
December 15, 2009, 10:21 PM
I reload which makes going to the range much more affordable. Otherwise I'd probably not consider shooting a hobby. As others have said buying stuff over the years adds up. You may want to consider what I see a few people have brought up. That is only buy things with cash. If you don't have cash you can't afford it.

HammerheadSSN663
December 15, 2009, 10:59 PM
correct me if I'm wrong LEOs but I think many folks shooting boxes and boxes of ammo every week are given shooting allowances by their place of work (i.e., the various Federal/State agencies, DEA, State Department, etc.) and then there are those who LOVE to shoot and are totally dedicated to that lifestyle. Total Bravo Zulu to them.

And there are many (if not most) folks like me - the casual range go'ers. I only go to the range a few times a year to keep me 'familiar' with my firearms.

IMO if you are not burning up thousand of rounds a year striving to become a finely tuned shooting machine, you're basically wasting your money. (IMO)


I can't keep this damn cigar lit typing!...later.

Jaybird78
December 15, 2009, 11:17 PM
This has been a great thread!

Like many have said before, you have to have priorities. I didn't start shooting until I was 17. Been trying to catch up ever since. I'm middle class, drive a Ranger truck, have a modest house with a small yard. I don't drink, gamble or wear fancy cloths (T-shirt and jeans kind of guy), don't golf anymore and don't own a boat or motorbike. Shooting/reloading is my only hobby.

I try to buy at least one gun a year and that is from OVERTIME. I bought two each of the last two years. (NOTE: Lost all guns on friends boat. ;-) )

Like others, try and cut back on those little things that add up. If your buying lunch everyday or coffee/beer then it's going to add up real quick.

Family is first.

Justin
December 15, 2009, 11:40 PM
I thought that shooting was an expensive hobby. And then I met guys who were into auto racing and speed boats.

No, I'm not a millionaire. I'm just barely middle class. Single*, no kids, and I do my best to keep debt to a minimum. I rarely go out, shun bars and the idiots that dwell in them, don't smoke, rarely eat out, don't blow money on frivolous purchases, and work a second part-time job for fun money.

On the gun front, I reload the calibers that I shoot the most and never, ever pay retail for guns or accessories unless I absolutely have no other choice. This entails buying firearms used, keeping an eye out for accessories that I have an interest in, and being willing to drop the money when opportunity arises.

I'm also not averse to trading or selling guns that no longer interest me, either.

On top of that, placing well enough at a match to be able to grab something useful off of the prize table helps as well, even if there's no chance of defraying the cost of attending the match in the first place.

*Eligible bachelorettes are invited to submit head shots, CV's, and credit scores. :)

Match14
December 16, 2009, 12:41 AM
I come up with my firearm related funds by scrounging on lifestyle stuff. For example, my cell phone is a pre-paid type one. It doesn't even have the capability to take pictures/email ect.. But my average cost for the cell phone per month is like 25.00. Most other people I know spend nearly $100 a month on their cell phone bill. That's $900 dollars a year right there!

Also the newest vehicle I have ever owned is a 1992, but I have 2 vehicles and both were paid for in cash. Not having a car payment helps a lot.

The greatest part about being cheap was that when I got laid off in April, it didn't effect my lifestyle to much, although I was lucky and found another job in August.

DammitBoy
December 16, 2009, 01:19 AM
Well.. you must be a millionaire then...

Nope, and future ex-wife #3 ain't getting any of my toys either!

Taniwha
December 16, 2009, 08:23 AM
Ive been a Shooter for as long as I can remember.
I`ve had a Job since I was 10 and all the money I`ve made has gone into shooting. I drive a 32yr old Ford F100, My computer`s 5 yrs old, most of my clothes are work issue, or gifts. I don`t smoke, gamble or womanise. I only drink a case a month. My tv/dvd player is 8 yrs old. I don`t have pay tv. I pack my own lunch and the last time I went out for dinner Howard was Prime Minister.
Since I was 10 I`ve Been Collecting Guns. My Dad Gave me My first 2 Shotguns, a .410 single and a 12ga O/U, for my 10th and 16th birthdays. I turned 30 in November and He gave me another 1, a 12ga Mossberg Pump. In the years between I`ve picked up 2 more Shotguns, 5 Rifles, 1 Revolver & 1 Automatic.

Boris Barowski
December 16, 2009, 08:49 AM
I think have quite a nice collection for a 21 year old student (2 HK pistols, Dan Wesson 1911, AR-15,Remington 700, Marlin 336, couple other cheap guns I picked up for $0-$150). But then again I work quite a few hours as an independent publisher and webdeveloper. This business has funded most of my purchases until now. A couple of my clients are gun stores, and I keep the price for their IT-project low, in return they make me a good deal when I need some gear

I also reload to save on ammo.

A millionaire I am not :(

Sam1911
December 16, 2009, 09:19 AM
correct me if I'm wrong LEOs but I think many folks shooting boxes and boxes of ammo every week are given shooting allowances by their place of work (i.e., the various Federal/State agencies, DEA, State Department, etc.)
There are probably some. But the LEOs I shoot with at all regularly tell me that their departments give them diddly SQUAT for practice ammo. Like a couple of boxes a year or whatever. No budget for it at all. And some have to fight with their departments to even be allowed to go practice with their duty weapons on their own dime!

Most cops just DON'T practice. And their departments do all they can to keep it that way.

if you are not burning up thousand of rounds a year striving to become a finely tuned shooting machine, you're basically wasting your money

Well, no "finely tuned machine" by a long shot, but my family budget is adjusted to allow 100-200 rds a week in practice and maybe another 200 rds a month for matches. Call it 7,500 rds a year. Doesn't seem like much when you say it like that, and for most serious shooters it isn't. But I understand what it means to the family to support that outlay and try to make my practice efficient and worthwhile. And I know if things get (any) tighter, that shooting budget will be the first thing cut.

-Sam

mcdonl
December 16, 2009, 09:44 AM
Sam, would you agree also that once you get to a certain level or profision you do not need AS MUCH range time as you once did?

I am Not saying you do not need to practice, but for the SD/HD shooter and the ability to hit COM you would not have the same level of training required for the competition shooter.

DirtyHarry31
December 16, 2009, 10:24 AM
I have been collecting guns for 30+ years. I don't smoke, drink (or hang at bars), or throw my money around. I reuse/recycle everything I can. I drive good used vehicles till they hit the 200K+ mileage. I do my own repairs or any work on my house and vehicles. I don't vacation in elaborate places. I keep my life very simple. People live for the thrills but that soon passes and you never seem to get enough so people spend their life away trying to pursue that way. But I do enjoy shooting & tinkering with guns. I try to buy the better quality of guns and take very good care of what I have. No I'm not a millionaire but I am comfortable and that's all anyone should ask of their lives. It took a long time to get what I have and yes I have made a bad descision or two, but I learn quickly not to step in it again. I wonder why people keep stepping in the same stuff all the time if it hurts you or your progression thru life? Some people just like the misery I guess. Advertisers/Sales live for your "dissatisfaction", always wanting something better because they tell you what you have is not good enough. Don't get sucked by this. Remember KISS (keep it simple stupid) and be wise about your choices in life.

chuckusaret
December 16, 2009, 10:44 AM
Heck, I use to be rich and also had a very large gun collection, but I lost it all when my boat sank. At my age money does not mean much to me. I still buy guns, I don't womanize, I don't buy green tomatoes and I have written my will so I am all set.

Sam1911
December 16, 2009, 11:27 AM
Sam, would you agree also that once you get to a certain level or profision you do not need AS MUCH range time as you once did?

Wow. That's a tough question. I can think of several ways of looking at it. At first I want to say, "NO NO NO!" But that's because I feel like the more I shoot the more I understand how much better I should be, and COULD be. Many folks will tell you that marksmanship is a diminishing skill, i.e.: if you don't constantly train and hone those skills, they degrade. Either improving, or getting worse, there is no "holding steady."

But, everything in life is a trade-off. Time, money, and other priorities -vs.- the level of skill you think you need to maintain.

Even the military -- who are paying guys to shoot other guys and get shot at in return -- does not drill marksmanship the way I think most folks think that they do. (Even Marine Infantrymen don't get weekly or even monthly rifle practice ... unless you count the "two-way range.") So, obviously, they've made the choices they have in order to balance all the duties of their troops, and the logistics of training space and time, in order to get what they hope is "enough." And, that "enough" is far less time and ammo than many civilian shooters put in.

So, what is "enough?"

I am Not saying you do not need to practice, but for the SD/HD shooter and the ability to hit COM you would not have the same level of training required for the competition shooter.This is the sort of decision each shooter would have to make for themselves. We read statistics that tell us that the majority of armed encounters end peacably with no shots fired. That's not really a shooting skill issue, then. (Though several important social skills, including the oft-mentioned "Situational Awareness" need to be practiced.) If the bad guy flees just because he SEES a gun, then having a gun is enough to get you through.

On the other hand, we debate endlessly about where and how to carry a weapon for the fastest draw, and how to execute any number of drills in preparation for making effective shots under bad conditions, under extreme stress, and all the while praying that the odds stack up in such a way that you even get the CHANCE to shoot when the time comes. And theory counts for nothing, unless you've practiced it until you can do right, fast, and in the instant of need without thinking.

Personally, I don't think I'll ever feel that I'm practiced enough, and skilled enough, to be ready to face a violent attack. But, on the other hand, I have to go to work, and have to feed my family, so I can't just drill all day every day. And I don't live my life worrying about it either.

It's a tough question. Anyone who can shoot faster and more accurately than the next guy on the line is going to believe that "that guy needs to practice more." And the guy standing two lanes away is thinking the same thing about the FIRST guy. Are Jerry Miculek, Todd Jarrett, and Robbie Laethem "ready" to face an armed attacker? Well, they sure are more ready than I am. But I'm doing the best that I can, based on my situation, skills, and priorities.

If you are doing the best you can, under your circumstances, and based upon a clear-eyed assessment of the risks you and yours are likely to face, then I can't fault you.

Tough question, though. And a really good one!

-Sam

HGUNHNTR
December 16, 2009, 11:38 AM
Definitely not rich, but I did have a couple great years at work that allowed me to buy several guns I had been dreaming about since I was a young boy. I have other interests as well though, travel (for the three of us to go anywhere costs a new AR and toys) if you want to look at it with that perspective. We love to eat out at nice resturaunts, and have nice clothing. Like I said I am not rich but if you prioritize and plan you can make it happen. It also helps to have a job that doesn't have a low static income.

Mike OTDP
December 16, 2009, 11:50 AM
I'm seeing a trend here, one that my personal experience supports.

The keys to having a large/high quality battery are:
1. Get an education.
2. Take the education and get a job that pays well.
3. Avoid having ex-wives and/or child support payments.
4. Booze/tobacco or guns. Pick one.
5. Save money.

Do these, and you can have the pleasant problem of figuring out where to put that third vault... :-)

preachnhunt
December 16, 2009, 12:11 PM
Mike OTDP pretty well sums it up for me too. We also have saved a ton of interest by doubling up on house payments. Come to think of it I could probably get another gun if I sold this compu

ny32182
December 16, 2009, 12:22 PM
Keep in mind also folks, that being a "millionaire" (i.e. household net worth of $1,000,000) isn't what it used to be. It is "comfortable"/middle class in most areas of the country. In some areas it probably doesn't even rate middle class. There are plenty of millionaires out there who wouldn't dream of buying (or would have to really adjust their finances to afford) some of the nicer toys mentioned in this thread; boats, Harleys, etc. Another part of that is going to be that self-made millionaires who got there by working a regular type job and saving, didn't get it done by blowing it on toys. Just one more aspect of the "priorities" thing.

And, I go to bars, eat out, *and* have a few guns... so you *know* I'm not a millionaire. :D

Ala Dan
December 16, 2009, 07:59 PM
Never, Ever trade a good, working firearm for something that you THINK
you may want now~! :banghead:

I've been there and done that, many times over. My advice now is too
THINK the whole situation through; as many times I have gone back, only
to replace the previously owned firearm. This kind'a action gets expensive
in a hurry~! ;) And, don't rely on someone else's fantastic tales. I know
a salesperson that promotes the .300 Weatherby Magnum, like it was a
gift from GOD that will drop dead all zombie's out to 500 yards. He tells
of dropping many white-tails at these distances, and beyond. Truth of
the matter is, that most of his shots are within the 200 yard range; well
within the range of the .270 Winchester, .308 Winchester, or the time
tested .30-06 Springfield~! :D No offense intended, as he is a great
guy as well as a good friend; but he does stretch the truth a bit~! :uhoh:

MarineOne
December 18, 2009, 03:05 AM
Most of the guns I've bought have fallen under the "right place, right time" circumstances.

I bought my Norinco SKS back in '95 for $169 and it came with a 30 round mag. If I had known what the prices would be like just in the past few months I would have bought out all those the gun store had ....

The same goes for my Plainfield M1C. I saw it on GunsAmerica, made the call, and had my wife do the rest. $525 for a police purchased gun that was test fired only.


I think that if you just keep an eye out for the stuff you want you'll find what you want at the price point you're willing to pay. The down side is you need to make sure you've got the cash onhand when you do find it.



Kris

PT1911
December 18, 2009, 03:07 AM
not a millionaire.. I just have a serious problem!!!!!!!!

Avenger29
December 18, 2009, 03:09 AM
I'm far from a millionaire, but I will tell you with a steady job and devoting a little bit of your paycheck to your hobby...it magically grows on it's own.

RP88
December 18, 2009, 03:21 AM
Seems like every trip to the range will cost you more than golf; a rich persons leisure pursuit if ever was one. Not that I know anything about golf . . .

depending on where you go golfing, fifty dollars of ammo plus a $1000 gun is a helluva lot cheaper than a day of golf plus a full set of clubs and good golf balls - and shoes, gloves, among other things... In fact, I think my dad's golf set could buy my mil-spec, tricked out AR nearly three times over i.e. pretty much 90% of my entire (small) collection.

I personally have what I feel is way too much money invested in guns for my age and yearly income. But, I still manage to pay what little bills I have to pay and have never come close to falling into debt - and I'm also patient. The good news is since I like milsurps more than anything, I don't have to worry about depreciation all too much and can always make my money back.

nwilliams
December 18, 2009, 03:37 AM
I own about 25 guns and ave owned close to 80 over the past two decades.

Of course I am not married, have no kids and I'm not a home owner, I also don't drive an expensive car. Other than buying guns I don't spend a lot of money on things.

I'm no where near rich. But a few years ago I racked up some considerable debt as a result of too many gun purchases in too short a time.:banghead:

Over the past year I've had to sell off a lot of my $1000+ guns to pay down my debt. If I buy new guns now I usually have to sell off a gun in order to buy a new one or put the gun on layaway and pay it off over time.

I've now vowed that I'll only buy one or two guns a year that are over $1k. Right now out of the 25 guns that I own there's only one that I paid more than $1k for.

JamisJockey
December 18, 2009, 08:44 AM
SSssshhhhh, don't tell the wife, but I might be lining up my next purchase....

Shung
December 18, 2009, 08:53 AM
After you got your 1st gun, it's much easier to find more money :p

Imapeopleperson
December 19, 2009, 09:45 AM
There's a friend of mine who simplified it for me with a saying of " there are the Have's and the Have not's" .

kimbernut
December 19, 2009, 02:33 PM
Your friend forgot to tell you a good percentage of the havenots can be haves if they can train themselves to work hard and save for what they want.

mustang_steve
December 19, 2009, 06:05 PM
A tip: since you're a newer gun owner, get a .22lr to practice with...the greatly lowered ammo prices will save you a LOT.

Second tip: If you like Altoids (the minty candy), those tins can hold a LOT of .22LR ammo...this matters when you can't find cheap ammo cans anywhere. I've doubled the capacity of my ammo can when going from using the 500-rd boxes to altoid tins. Just stack the rounds where one points right, the next left, and so on...vertically as well as horizontally. It doesn't have to be perfect, but the more perfect it is, the more you can fit in....and bend the lid front in a bit to make sure it closes snug. It's also convenient to take to the range like this.

It's possible to be a low-buck shooter, you just have to have some sense about you....not going for the latest thing unless it offers value.....and saving up for the good stuff. My next upgrade may be a laser device that lets me do dry-fire target practice with my DAO 9mm pistol. If it works, I'll save a load of cash.

Just keep in there.....if I can find a way to afford shooting (and I'm unemployed), you can too. Just make every range trip as fruitful as possible.

oaksalad
December 19, 2009, 06:15 PM
Some people say I have a fortune tied up in guns,but it has taken me 30 years to get my modest collection together.
It is a life long pursuit.You buy some,trade for some,inherit some and some are even given to you.I guess it does add up,
but again if you account for the 30 years spent on them,it is not that bad.

You learn to be more frugal,especially with todays economy.

Don't be sad,just enjoy what you got and don't stop lusting
after the "next" aquisition.

:D

Boolit
December 20, 2009, 08:48 AM
I have been married 33 years next month. Long ago, I told the wife to simply stop her bitchin' and listen to my wisdom. Guns are currency. They are the only thing on Earth that will never diminish in worth, wether it be to kill or to save. They are universal weapons, and can be used by anyone from all walks of life. Regardless of who controls the planet, guns will always be valuable.

I collect them. I use them. I cherish them, and they give me pleasure. When I am gone, my wife and/or kids can sell them and benefit greatly. Can anyone truly think of any other hobby that will provide benefits of this magnitude?

Boolit
December 20, 2009, 09:20 AM
Oh, and in keeping with the original poster's theme on being a millionaire:

Like anything else, buying guns and supporting your hobby isn't a matter of being rich; its a matter of being consistent and persistent. You've got to be focused, and know what you want and then take steps to make that happen.

Rule #1. Realize you can't have it all.

Nobody can. Nobody will. Try to gauge yourself and how you fit into this statement. Go for what you want, but realize that you can't have an M82A1 on a 10/22 budget. Start small. Start practical. Patience is your friend. Consistency over time will get the job done.

Rule #2. Pay yourself first.

You work, right? You get paid, right? Regardless of the interval in which you get your income, the most-important thing you can do is to skim your hobby money right off the top. Its the only way you can insure that your guns & ammo money will be solid. Just be sure you aren't neglecting the priorities, like family and such. There have been times when I could barely pay my bills, but I have always managed to tuck away a few bucks every week to build up towards my next gun.

Rule #3. Choose Your Poison.

Cross-examine yourself. Be honest. What other hobbies do you have? What are the other drains on your wallet? Do you really need that Starbucks every morning on the way in to work? Are you spending $10 or more every day for lunch? Do you smoke? I used to. I quit when butts became over $2 a pack. Those were the glory days, right? Friends tell me that smokes are nearly $6 a pack these days. Unbelieveable. What I am saying here is that if you scrutinize where your money is draining, you may be able to stop that leak and divert the flow towards your new hobby. See Rule #1.

CooperThunder
December 20, 2009, 10:40 PM
So my 20 year old son is a millionaire considering that he has a rifle collection? He started when he was 17...one here, one there...

Wirenut1212
December 20, 2009, 11:00 PM
Man look at it like and investment, take care of your stuff and it won't go down much, I am new to this pistol deal and to reloading look around there are very few deals on good reloading machines, most go for almost new prices like it is better for them to be broke in or something. I research like someone with a-d-d, then handle or look at what ever it is and pick the right one for me. And remember the best argument ever is hunny I am in the basement not out drinking or running around, works like a charm. Every hobbie is expensive or there would be no market for it haha!!

stonecoldy
December 20, 2009, 11:07 PM
I like Mike OTDP's summary, repeated below:

The keys to having a large/high quality battery are:
1. Get an education.
2. Take the education and get a job that pays well.
3. Avoid having ex-wives and/or child support payments.
4. Booze/tobacco or guns. Pick one.
5. Save money.

I suffered from #3 until this past spring when my son graduated from high school. My house is paid off as of two years ago.
You can have it all with #4 and make it work, just use moderation! I love beer.

Most of my hobbies are low money consumers, I have a life North American bird list and make two trips a year around the country looking for birds I've never seen, this typically costs me around $2000 total, only surpassed by shooting/hunting activities.
My current occupation started 23 years ago, I made $6.00 an hour, couldn't afford much. Just takes time. I had to be patient, now I can afford some things nice.

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