AR-15 Short stroking...? Whats going ON!?


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MoDerN_WarRioR
December 16, 2009, 12:56 AM
OK I was at the range last weekend out plinking with some of my family and we where all having a ball with my AR! Everything was flawless, not a miss feed or jam, all was good! Well for about the first 120 rounds or so...

Then my girlfriend went to shoot it and she pulled the trigger and the gun fully cycled just fine! Shot the bullet, extracted the spent cartridge, and re-cocked itself. She went to pull the trigger one more time and *tink* nothing happened except the hammer dropped. I though OK maybe it was a "dud primer" so i extracted it by re-cocking it via the charge handle, it ejected the unspent cartridge and re-chambered the new bullet. It shot again and next shot it didn't shoot!!! Ugh its so frustrating! it did it probably a dozen times...

So at the range i totally field stripped the gun, lubed up the bolt, the carrier, everything and it seemed to help for a few rounds because i got about 5 shot off and then started misfiring again. I checked the firing pin, its ok. I also totally soaked the buffer spring in solvent and brushed it to remove any carbon and also dumped a ton of oil inside the buffer tube to maybe allow it to flow better...

I dont know what to do. Do i need a new spring? or what? Please help some one! Thanks so much!!

-Chris

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Avenger29
December 16, 2009, 01:02 AM
Describe the rifle in more detail, please. Barrel length, gas system (carbine, midlength, rifle), ammunition used, brand of rifle, and what your buffer weight is (i.e, carbine, H, H2, etc), plus if you've recently changed the buffer tube or anything else recently.

There are a few factors that can make the rifle malf, and the above information should be more helpful in diagnosing the likely cause. Don't fret too much, because this can be solved, but some details would be more helpful.

Oh, and as posted below, make sure the firing pin channel is clean.

Ridgerunner665
December 16, 2009, 01:03 AM
Thats not "short stroking"...thats a "failure to fire".

Inside the bolt...how clean is it??

Carbon build up on the inside of the bolt around the firing pin hole???

Ridgerunner665
December 16, 2009, 01:09 AM
just for clarity...


"Short stroke" = the gun fires and usually (but not always) ejects the spent casing, but because the bolt didn't come all the way back...it fails to pick up the next round from the magazine.

Common causes = dirty gun and/or using a powder that burns too fast for the bullet weight.


From the OP's description...this is not his problem.

atblis
December 16, 2009, 01:18 AM
Improperly staked gas key that is now loose. Doesn't sound like your problem though.

Ridgerunner665
December 16, 2009, 01:21 AM
Yep...that'll make em short stroke too.

MoDerN_WarRioR
December 16, 2009, 01:23 AM
Well here are some specs. With out tearing through the owners Manual, it is a DPMS sportical. (Which i know alot of people have their opinions about. But has been a great rifle to me.)

Its all stock no internal mods (only exterior add's)
- 16" Barrel
- .223 Cal
- Was shooting 55gr. PMC Bronze (which ALWAYS shoots flawless in my gun)
- Bolt is clean after every 200 or so rounds.
- I did not notice any excess carbon build up around the pin hole.

Ridgerunner! That is exactly what it seems to be doing. The guy at AZ Tactical explained in detail what a short stroke is and i DO believe that my gun is short stroking because it will pick up the round IF the bolt is completely back, but for some reason right now i BELIEVE it is NOT going completely aft so it isn't picking up the new round.

Is this sufficient information?

Thanks!
- Chris

KW
December 16, 2009, 01:25 AM
If a fresh round is being stripped and the bolt goes back into battery, it's not short stroking. Are the primers on the rounds that didn't fire showing marks from the firing pin similar to spent cases?

Ridgerunner665
December 16, 2009, 01:27 AM
Ok...you said ..."tink", pulled charging handle and extracted the unspent round.

If its short stroking...there won't be an unspent round in the chamber.

The gun has to fire...not go "tink" ;)

If it don't fire...there is no way for it to pick up the next round.


Something is getting lost in translation here...

Mags
December 16, 2009, 01:28 AM
Check for debris in your buffer tube assembly if the bolt isn't going all the way back.

MoDerN_WarRioR
December 16, 2009, 01:30 AM
No KW the primers where not hit. Infact i would eject the misfired cartridge, reload it and re-cock the gun and it would shoot.

Mags
December 16, 2009, 01:32 AM
Sounds more like a failure to go to battery to me, if the primers are not being struck. Could be a weak or broke hammer spring as well.

MoDerN_WarRioR
December 16, 2009, 01:33 AM
Ridgerunner your right i think i did word it wrong. i would pull the charging handle back which pulled the bolt completly aft and you are right, No sell extracted. :) My bad! only when it fires, i get a spent shell extracted. Other wise the chanber IS empty.

Ridgerunner665
December 16, 2009, 01:34 AM
Its a firing pin obstruction of some kind...or a hammer obstruction.

Are there any primer parts in the hammer? (No...I have NEVER fired cheap hot loaded 5.56 ammo that didn't have crimped primers...LOL)

MoDerN_WarRioR
December 16, 2009, 01:35 AM
If it where a broke hammer spring should'nt it stop firing all together? Possible it is weak.

KW
December 16, 2009, 01:36 AM
Ok, so you pull the charging handle after it didn't fire and find no round in the chamber? Is the bolt definitely closing all the way? You may want to verify it is with the forward assist. Typically with a short stroke the bolt hangs over the top of the mag and it's obvious something is wrong. It sounds like you just aren't getting a round stripped off of the mag sometimes which may be a mag issue, or a mag catch issue.

Mags
December 16, 2009, 01:36 AM
No it may not stop fring all together depending on how it is broke/worn.

MoDerN_WarRioR
December 16, 2009, 01:37 AM
Primer parts in the hammer? like peices that would obstruct the strike?

Ridgerunner665
December 16, 2009, 01:38 AM
OK...it is short stroking then.

Could be ammo, loose gas key, obstruction in buffer tube, remote possibility of an obstructed gas tube...what did we leave out???

Its late...I'm forgetful when its late.

Ridgerunner665
December 16, 2009, 01:40 AM
And yes...primer junk (and sometimes the whole spent primer even) can and will make its way into the hammer and stop the rifle dead in its tracks.

MoDerN_WarRioR
December 16, 2009, 01:42 AM
Those options have all come to mind for me too runner. I will inspect everything from the hammer up to the pin including the bolt. Even if i have to buy a high speed camera to view the bolt's progress. if its moving back far enough or not.

Thanks for your help! Get some sleep. i need too also. LoL

MoDerN_WarRioR
December 16, 2009, 01:45 AM
Alight guys, i will strip it apart tomorrow again and look over all the areas people have brought up! Thanks for your help everyone!

Ill let you know if i get to the root of this.

If anyone has any more ideas i will check back frequently so post up! thanks!

KW
December 16, 2009, 01:47 AM
Well you don't need a high speed camera - just fire some rounds with an empty mag inserted. If the bolt locks back on the empty mag every time it isn't short stroking.

Uncle Mike
December 16, 2009, 02:15 AM
Mud dobber nest in works!

Take apart, clean really good, examine for stuff that's NOT supposed to be there and is there, and for stuff that's supposed to be there and is not there, re-assemble, lube, shoot! lol

More than likely some bad ammo....how are the feed lips of your mag(s), did it do it with all your mags?

Bobarino
December 16, 2009, 02:23 AM
did you change or modify the gas block by chance? if so, the hole in the barrel and the hole in the gas block may not be aligned properly? gas rings at 120 to each other? gas tube and gas key mating correctly?

Bobby

Runningman
December 16, 2009, 05:26 AM
Try some better ammo such as some sort of M193. The 55gr PMC Bronze I recently ran over my chronograph only clocked about 2817 FPS at 14 feet out of a 16" AR. Mighty pathetic 55 grain ammo if you ask me.

cottonmouth
December 16, 2009, 07:27 AM
I had a 20 inch AR that was short stroking. I had an extra buffer spring that was a little shorter, by 2 or 3 coils. Put it in and she runs perfect now.

J.B.

jdh
December 16, 2009, 09:44 AM
Make sure the gas rings in the bolt are not lined up.

Avenger29
December 16, 2009, 12:27 PM
gas rings at 120 to each other?

Make sure the gas rings in the bolt are not lined up.

That is absolutely, positively not a factor and a complete waste of time. The gun will run with one gas ring only, by the way.

Omaha-BeenGlockin
December 16, 2009, 01:23 PM
Easiest thing to try---use Breakfree liberally on the whole bolt/carrier assembly---run it wet and see what happens.

Be sure to work it into the extractor.

jdh
December 16, 2009, 02:15 PM
A small block chevy will run with only one compression ring on each of the pistons. It won't run well or make much power but it will run. Still don't make it right to do it that way.

Bartholomew Roberts
December 16, 2009, 03:21 PM
OK, you have made several contradictory statements. It is going to be difficult to tell you what is going on when you are telling us different stories about what is going on.

though OK maybe it was a "dud primer" so i extracted it by re-cocking it via the charge handle, it ejected the unspent cartridge and re-chambered the new bullet.

i would pull the charging handle back which pulled the bolt completly aft and you are right, No sell extracted.

Assuming the second quote is the correct one, the first step is to confirm that it is short-stroking. You do this by loading a round in the chamber and an empty magazine. Check to see whether the bolt locks back after firing. If it does not, then combined with your earlier statements, this is probably short-stroking.

On a DPMS, the first place I would look is the gas key on the bolt carrier. DPMS does not stake this part and the gas key can come loose. Verify that the gas key and gas key screws are all tight. From here work your way along the flow of the gas looking for possible leaks in the system. (Check out the animated cutaway of an AR15 firing in the Rifle Forum Reading Library if you aren't sure about how the gas flows).

If the gas key is tight, then look for obstructions in the gas key or gas tube. I've seen popped primers get in there and jam things up good, and it can be tough to diagnose. Another common cause is people getting overzealous with cleaning and stuffing q-tips, etc. in the gas tube/gas key so that parts of them end up stuck in there.

Check the front sight block and the gas tube there to make sure there are no leaks.

If none of that pans out, pull the buffer spring and measure it. The acceptable range for a normal carbine buffer spring is 10 1/16 inches (25.56 cm) minimum to 11 1/4 inches (28.58 cm) maximum.

One other question: What type of magazines were you using and did the problem occur with a single magazine or more than one magazine?

Still don't make it right to do it that way.

If having the gas rings lined up causes a problem, then the rifle is marginal in some other area as well. A "healthy" AR will run reliably with a single gas ring. If staggering the gas rings on an AR "fixes" something then you can bet there is still another problem to be solved in the gas system.

Avenger29
December 16, 2009, 03:22 PM
A small block chevy will run with only one compression ring on each of the pistons. It won't run well or make much power but it will run. Still don't make it right to do it that way.

That has nothing to do with the AR-15.

I'm pointing out that you are wasting your time when you play the "stagger the gas ring" game (who the heck came up with that bull anyway?!) and that the gap on the gas ring is not an issue.

rcmodel
December 16, 2009, 03:26 PM
Make sure the gas rings in the bolt are not lined up. Myth.

You can aling the rings till heck freezes over and they will not be aligned after firing it a few times. They are constantly moving all the time and won't stay 120 degrees apart if you put them on that way.

And it doesn't matter anyway.

Like Avenger29 said, if everything else is right, it should still run, even with one ring missing and the two remaining ring gaps aligned.

rc

jdh
December 16, 2009, 07:24 PM
So you guys must be much smarter than the guys who wrote the tech manual then.

The manual says to check for ring alignment and wear quarterly.
http://www.arjunkie.com/freepage/firearmdiagrams/M16%20MAINTENANCE%20MANUAL.pdf
Section 2-7.

Avenger29
December 16, 2009, 07:33 PM
They're still wrong. If I recall correctly, a military operator's manual that I have says to only lightly lubricate the rifle, which is incorrect.

Just because the .mil says to do it, doesn't make it right. They are very institutionalized and often reluctant to change procedures that ought to be changed.

The procedure for checking the gas rings is as follows, IIRC.
The gas rings are checked to make sure they are still there/in the right place and then the bolt is to be placed in the carrier and held with the bolt pointing straight down. If the bolt slides out, then it's time to replace the rings.

taliv
December 16, 2009, 07:48 PM
there's an easy way to prove it to yourself, jdh... take 2 of the 3 rings off your bolt and see if your AR will cycle.

cottonmouth
December 16, 2009, 09:17 PM
I won't have to wory about the gas rings, I put one piece rings in both my AR's.

J.B.

Canuck-IL
December 16, 2009, 10:15 PM
I also totally soaked the buffer spring in solvent and brushed it to remove any carbon and also dumped a ton of oil inside the buffer tube to maybe allow it to flow better...
That's not a good idea ... even worse as temps get lower.
/Bryan

MoDerN_WarRioR
December 17, 2009, 12:44 AM
Alright Guys. Alot going on in this thread. Alot of talk about the gas rings and the alignment and stuff... that's not really my issue on here. That is all not an issue with my problem. This is all very useful information but lets try to kinda get back on track just a little bit.

Ok, so... After inspection today i took everything all apart and inspected all the little pieces everyone suggested to check and all seems well.
- The bolt does not have a bunch of carbon build up around the pin hole
- The Gas block is very solid (no shifting) (also no i did not ever modify the block)
- I checked the key and nothing is loose or missing.
- The only concern for me is what is the best way to clean the inside of the gas tube out?

Barth, like i said in a previous post, that i didn't word my comment correctly so i know i had 2 conflicting statements. The second statement, the one that assumes short stroking is the correct statement. So when i get out to the range hopefully soon, i will try the one bullet in the magazine test to see if the bolt remains Aft or not.

Is there a way i can check manually if it is short stroking with out actually firing the weapon? i have snap caps so i don't have to use actual ammo. is there a way or no?

And also Canuck, why is it such a bad idea? I guess i was told incorrectly to lube up the buffer spring alot. I figured it will help ensure smooth flow of the buffer and prevent it from sticking (if thats the case.) AND i do live in Arizona so im not too worried with the temperatures dropping too low. LoL It was 73-74 degrees today in the mid December!!! CRAZY!

Thanks everyone for the answers! Lets keep the advise coming! :) Im always down to try new options!

Avenger29
December 17, 2009, 01:29 AM
- The only concern for me is what is the best way to clean the inside of the gas tube out?

Don't put anything in the gas tube other than something like Breakfree Powderblast/Gunscrubber/non-chlorinated brake cleaner. Do not stick any brushes, pipe cleaners, or the like down the gas tube.

And yet using the above chemicals in the gas tube is wasting them, for the gas tube will be blasted by the thousands of PSI of the gas coming back to work the action and it will be just as dirty as before. The gas tube is the part of the AR that is the only part of the AR that can be said to be "self cleaning" (you know, how the AR is mocked as).

The talk about the gas rings is because other posters (two) have given completely incorrect advice to do so.

And also Canuck, why is it such a bad idea? I guess i was told incorrectly to lube up the buffer spring alot. I figured it will help ensure smooth flow of the buffer and prevent it from sticking (if thats the case.) AND i do live in Arizona so im not too worried with the temperatures dropping too low. LoL It was 73-74 degrees today in the mid December!!! CRAZY!

Lubing up the buffer spring is a bad idea. The only thing it does is that it quiets down the "sprong", it does not do anything good for the rifle. It attracts dust and grime and that can cause issues, plus it can get on your clothes. You should not lube the spring/buffer beyond an extremely light amount for corrosion protection. I also suppose you could use a very light amount of dry film lubricant of some type for the same purpose. In short, treat the buffer springs like your mags- don't lube either.

Bartholomew Roberts
December 17, 2009, 09:23 AM
Is there a way i can check manually if it is short stroking with out actually firing the weapon? i have snap caps so i don't have to use actual ammo. is there a way or no?

There is no way. The whole point is that your gas system may not be receiving enough gas to cycle the action. There aren't too many ways of determining whether it is getting enough gas without giving it some gas to work with and that involves shooting.

- The Gas block is very solid (no shifting) (also no i did not ever modify the block)

How about the area where the gas tube goes into the front sight base? Is the roll pin securing the tube still present and does it look tight here? See a lot of carbon near that area (not like a little spot; but a fairly large smudge several times the size of the roll pin)?

- I checked the key and nothing is loose or missing.

Did you look inside the key for an obstruction? A popped primer will have a dull/shiny gray color and can be tough to spot in there.

- The only concern for me is what is the best way to clean the inside of the gas tube out?

I second everything Avenger29 said on this subject. If 15,000 psi of hot gas isn't going to clear it out of the way, I don't think you are going to have much luck poking at it with a q-tip.

By the way, what about the magazines? Did you use only a single magazine or several different magazines? What types of magazines did you use?

So you guys must be much smarter than the guys who wrote the tech manual then.

Well, I don't know who is smarter; but I do know which one of us is right on this particular point. A couple of things to realize jdh - first is that making changes to the manuals is a very involved process that doesn't happen instantly. Second, is that the manual you linked to is dated 1997 and we have had quite a few changes in the way we do M16/M4 maintenance since then. At the time that manual was written, things like the enhanced extractor spring for M4s didn't even exist.

The manual says to check for ring alignment and wear quarterly.
http://www.arjunkie.com/freepage/fir...E%20MANUAL.pdf
Section 2-7.

Checking for wear is important. Ring alignment is meaningless. As others already pointed out, the rings rotate freely - so even if they were staggered when you put them in, what are the chances they will remain that way for the next three months? Likewise, if they did happen to align, chances are they would be unaligned by the time you got them out of the weapon. Totally nonsensical advice - and sadly not the only nonsensical advice the military puts out about M16s; but I don't want to derail the thread further by going into that subject.

Give a try yourself and see what you think.

Uncle Mike
December 17, 2009, 10:06 AM
seriously guys....!!!

taliv
December 17, 2009, 10:16 AM
Alot of talk about the gas rings and the alignment and stuff... that's not really my issue on here. That is all not an issue with my problem.

actually, worn rings result in symptoms quite similar to the one you described (the 2nd time)

i doubt that is your problem since it's a new gun, but you never know; the rings you have may not have been treated properly or something and may be prematurely worn.

the typical way people check is to take your BCG out of the gun, extend the bolt fully and stand it up on end (bolt down). if the friction of the rings is sufficient to hold the weight of the carrier up, then it's probably good. if the carrier slides down a bit, you need to put new rings in

cottonmouth
December 17, 2009, 12:13 PM
I still say the buffer spring is too long or too strong, mine was a DPMS too. But it could be something else, I won't be mad if it is!

J.B.

Tirod
December 17, 2009, 12:23 PM
Check the buttstock screw hole is clear. If the compressed air can't be relieved, the rifle shortstrokes. Adding lots of oil to the buffer tube will obstruct it and seal things even more.

Use enough lube on the BCG from round one to make it wet. After 100 rounds, a dry bolt will collect enough carbon to start sticking. Don't run the gun dry.

The gas ring issue is overblown. I get the same complaints from customers who thought their tire stems should always point the same direction on every wheel. They had no clue about differing turning circles or the necessary action of a differential. Same thing here. The .mil manual says check them quarterly - not after every round shot. They move around and when compressed in the bolt carrier, seal well enough.

No, I don't know who started the crap about getting them separated, but then again, we had to scrape carbon off the bolt tail, too. It doesn't do anything. Most of what I was taught about cleaning the M16 ranks right along with using a drill driver and inserting the bore brush through the muzzle.

Clear the buffer tube hole in the stock screw, let it breath. Lube the bolt carrier and use it wet. Shoot it. It should work fine.

jdh
December 17, 2009, 12:50 PM
Ok, a well maintained functional AR with no issues MAY run on one gas ring or with the rings aligned. One ring is going to flop aroung in the cut and tilt causing wear that is not normal. It is your gun if you want to run it way more power to you.

Worn rings can allow gas to leak through. The rings aligned will allow gas to escape. In an AR with a clean gas system this may not lower the pressure enough to cause functional issues.

A gas leak from an improperly fitted front gas block, worn, loose, obstructed key, or a gas tube blockage from build up or a kink, or any other number of things can cause low gas pressure in the BCG. The leakage around the rings added to the already low gas pressure can contribute to functionality issues.

All it takes is a few additional seconds during the re-assembly process to check an correct one of the potential problems. One that you do have control over.

I never said it would absolutley cause the problem. It is a potential contributing factor. But what do I know? I only have to keep the 12 worn out, dirty, abused range guns running, three days a week for 6 weeks out of the year, long enough for the 260 or so users to shoot their qual course.

MoDerN_WarRioR
December 17, 2009, 06:53 PM
Alright so after reading ALL the posts, there are a few easy things im going to try before heading to the range again.

1.) Im going to check the overall buffer spring length to make sure it has enough room to go fully back.

2.) Im going to mop up the oil out of the buffer tube to prevent it from gumming it up.

3.) I AM NOT going to que-tip or pipe clean the gas tube because those points about the HOT 15000psi gas pushing through is well enough advice to ensure me there probably isnt anything clogged in that tube.

4.) im going to run that thing wet! and as well im going to try my hardest to reduce any friction on any moving part with oil and or cleaning it even more than i do already.

OK so if i do find out my buffer spring is too long, how can i go about shortening it? maybe cutting of 2-3 coils of metal? But i dont want any burrs to add friction.

Also, i will take a look at my rings and ensure at that moment they are separated. but i do believe like many people have mentioned that they bounce around and shift and change direction from the shock of the gun, but worth checking. They could be worn as well like TALIV mentioned but, that i will deal with later if this stuff doesnt work.

ALSO: people have been asking which magazines i have been using and i got 2 PMAG 30 round mags that have been amazing. they seat nicely but do kind of rock somewhat... could this maybe be introducing a new cause to the problem??

Thanks guys!!
-Chris

feedthehogs
December 17, 2009, 07:18 PM
Just for S&G's, I would try another brand of ammo.

I teach CCW classes and the ranges I've been going to all have been selling PMC bronze ammo.

In various calibers and .223 I've had consistant ammo failures with this brand(low charge in semi auto and hard primers in semi and revolver). Switch to another brand and the failures go away with the students.

A poorly seated or rocking magazine can lead to FTF's. I would also caution you about wetting down the AR too much. A little oil goes a long way.

Avenger29
December 17, 2009, 07:24 PM
A poorly seated or rocking magazine can lead to FTF's. I would also caution you about wetting down the AR too much. A little oil goes a long way.

The AR runs extremely well wet, especially once it gets filthy. That's wet on/around the BCG, not elsewhere, though. Lube in buffer tube or magazines? Not good. Lube in chamber/barrel, especially enough to cause an overpressure situation? Very, very bad!

MoDerN_WarRioR
December 17, 2009, 07:30 PM
I will try some other brands of ammo. The only one im staying away from is Remington 223. which is one alot of people use, i have had nothing but failures whith this ammo. the PMC usually shoots amazing up untill now. But i have been shooting Winchester 5.56 and so far i have been pleased with it as well. i might try a few other brands.

What can i do to help prevent rocking or moving of the magz in the receiver?

-Chris

taliv
December 17, 2009, 07:45 PM
that mag moves normally. it's no big deal. (unless your magwell is ridiculously out of spec)


don't sweat the ammo. even wolf should cycle your gun.

MoDerN_WarRioR
December 17, 2009, 10:17 PM
Ya i figured it would have some play to it.

Thanks for the tips!

Bartholomew Roberts
December 18, 2009, 08:07 AM
Modern, it sounds like you have good magazines. Sometimes if the mag spring is worn out you can get that same symptom. These are new, reliable mags that work (and two different ones), so probably not an issue here.

I would go ahead and do the gas ring test Taliv mentioned. It is easy enough to do and is one more thing you can check before going to the range. Otherwise, it sounds like you have a good plan going. Take good notes and I am sure we can get it fixed.

It is a potential contributing factor. But what do I know? I only have to keep the 12 worn out, dirty, abused range guns running, three days a week for 6 weeks out of the year, long enough for the 260 or so users to shoot their qual course.

Will having the rings lined up lower pressure a minute amount? Yes. Will it lower it enough to cause a problem? Only if your rifle was already on the ragged edge of short-stroking anyway due to some other issue.

But you don't have to take my word for it, you are in a perfect position to test it yourself. Take those 12 rifles and deliberately line up the gas rings on them every time they get taken out for shooting in the next six months. Log any short-stroking problem regardless of the cause.

Now stagger the gas rings and do the same thing for six months. I'll bet you money the results are virtually identical given the sample size.

Lex
January 25, 2010, 09:03 PM
Any updates on this thread???

[Pb]
January 25, 2010, 10:09 PM
I think your bolt might not be all the way closed, look for crud buildup that might prevent it from locking. Your AR15 doesn't have a forward assist does it?

The_Hammer_Man
January 27, 2010, 09:45 PM
+1 to what {PB} says...

I have a DPMS Sportical in .223 too and when it was new it would fail to go completely into battery at times. Eventually it stopped doing it but it was a major source of irritation.

Does your Sportical have a carbine stock or an A2? The way I got rid of my "issues" was to put a SprinCo "red" buffer spring in it and replaced the stock buffer with a H-2 heavy buffer. The combination of those two parts really slams the door!

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