Please help identify the manufacturer of my Hawken 50


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ncpi
December 20, 2009, 01:04 PM
Picked up a "Springfield Hawken 50 Cal" made in Spain at the gun show this weekend. After lots of online searching, I haven't been able to figure out the manufacturer. Hope the experts here can point me in the right direction.

Here are some pics of the gun and the markings on both sides of the barrel.

I have experience with rifles, shotguns and handguns, but this is my first black powder rifle.

It has a 1-66" twist. Was planning on using ball ammo. What are the recommended power loads for a gun like this? Can one use the pre-measured loads like pyrodex? What type of patch and lube would you recommend as well?

Thanks

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Chawbaccer
December 20, 2009, 01:29 PM
I know them to be sold by Traditions, so I would guess made by Ardessa.

ncpi
December 20, 2009, 01:52 PM
"Traditions" like the ones Bass Pro Shops sells, I guess. Ardessa is the manufacturer in Spain then?

Thanks. I'll follow that lead.

Would also appreciate info on whether you can use the pre-measured pellets in a gun like this (side percussion) or whether you have to use loose powder.

Thanks.

Acorn Mush
December 20, 2009, 01:59 PM
Welcome to the forum NCPI.
I have experience with rifles, shotguns and handguns, but this is my first black powder rifle.

It has a 1-66" twist. Was planning on using ball ammo. What are the recommended power loads for a gun like this? Can one use the pre-measured loads like pyrodex? What type of patch and lube would you recommend as well?

I can't tell which company might have made your rifle, but as far as a starting load, try 50 grains of 3fg black powder or an equivalent volume of Pyrodex RS, a .490" ball, and a .015" to .018" 100% cotton patch. For lube you can use saliva, Hoppe's #9Plus, Bore Butter, or just plain Crisco to start.

Keep in mind that if using greased patches you may have to swab out the barrel every few shots but may not have to with the liquid-based lubes. Each barrel is different however.

By "pre-measured loads like Pyrodex" I presume you mean pellets. Yes, you CAN use them and many guys do, but they are WAY more expensive than loose Pyrodex. Also, you can't fine-tune your loads for accuracy since you are limited by the grain weight of the pellet (ie. you have to use either one or two 50-grain pellets at a time versus say, measuring out 65 grains of loose powder for an "intermediate" load).

It has been reported here and in other forums that Pyrodex may cause hangfires, or require the use of a magnum cap. Ignition reliability depends upon the construction of your particular rifle and you will never know for sure until you shoot it.

I personally use and recommend real black powder. It ignites easily every time (unless damp of course), and the fouling is not nearly as corrosive as that of Pyrodex.

Stay tuned here for all the advice you need. Lots of helpful folks ready and willing to share the benefit of their experiences with you.

ncpi
December 20, 2009, 03:18 PM
Thanks Acorn Mush. Excellent info for starting out w/ this muzzle loader.

arcticap
December 20, 2009, 04:03 PM
Pellets are not recommended for use in sidelocks. A small amount of loose powder would really need to be loaded into the barrel first as a starter load to help ignite the pellet powder, and even that's not usually recommended.
Loose powder is the way to go.
Start with 50 grains and then increase the powder in 5-10 grain increments until you're satisfied with the accuracy.

An owner's manual for the similar Hawken Woosdman:

http://www.traditionsfirearms.com/eshop/products/TRADITIONS%20SIDELOCK%20BOOK1.pdf

ncpi
December 20, 2009, 04:20 PM
I kind of figured loose powder would be better as the ignition has to travel down the nipple, across the drum and into the barrel to light the charge. I guess being able to measure it and adjust in small increments also makes it an easy decision.

I was able to get the Traditions manual from their website and it appears that this is the brand of mine. Thanks for that pointer.

Can I use regular Hoppes #9 as patch lube? I already have that in my cleaning supplies. Although the suggestion of "Crisco" is a really cool idea, so maybe I'll go that route initially.

Thanks everyone who responded so quickly. Feel free to keep educating me though :)

Acorn Mush
December 20, 2009, 05:33 PM
Can I use regular Hoppes #9 as patch lube?

NO, don't use regular Hoppe's #9. It is made as a SMOKELESS powder solvent. You'll probably be letting yourself in for a mess of a cleaning job if you use it.:barf:

Use Hoppe's #9 PLUS, which is made for use with black powder. Different critter altogether.

Here is a recipe for Stumpy's Moose Juice patch lube. I don't use it but others do and like it.

Stumpy's Moose Juice

A general purpose blackpowder solvent and liquid patch lube. Shake well before using

Castor Oil 3 oz.
Murphy's Oil Soap 1 oz.
Witch Hazel 4 oz.
Isopropyl Alcohol (91%) 8 oz.
Water (non-chlorinated if available) 16 oz.

Dip patching in this twice and let it dry laid flat on wax paper in between. Makes a semi-dry patch material that's easy to carry & use. If you don't mind carrying a little bottle it's a GREAT liquid lube as is.

ncpi
December 20, 2009, 08:47 PM
Thanks for clearing up the Hoppe's type difference before I did something dumb.

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