Best Handgun Caliber as a Sidearm for Hogs?


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Daddywagz
December 20, 2009, 04:08 PM
I've started hunting pigs and have been told it's wise to carry a handgun. I don't have a handgun. What's are some good calibers for this purpose? I've been looking at .40 s&w... is that enough?

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jakk280rem
December 20, 2009, 04:26 PM
.40 s&w... is that enough?

with the right bullet selection it should be. it's a good minimum. i'f your looking for a dedicated hunting sidearm, the 357 mag opens up alot of bullet and gun options. if your set on an auto pistol, 357 sig, 10mm, and 45 acp would be good choices. with any of these bullet selection is critical. feral hogs are tough, crazy little critters. your gonna want a tough bullet, something that will expand, but not come apart. first choice would be a barnes x, a jsp, maybe efmj.

NG VI
December 20, 2009, 04:26 PM
If you are going to go .40, I would say you should probably go for a longer barrel, and a heavy, deep penetrator loaded about as hot as .40 can go, like maybe the Hornady 200 grain XTP, or Buffalo Bore or Double Tap loadings of either that or a FMJ or hard cast bullet.

10mm would probably be about the best you could do for it, other than a .357 or .44 revolver, again with a 200 grain bullet, one of those two companies also sells a 230 grain hard cast 10mm load which would be great.



I don't know about hunting hogs, but that's what I would go with for an autopistol.

MICHAEL T
December 20, 2009, 05:08 PM
I would go with a 357 mag Lots of different loads to be found A single action Ruger be my choice accurate and reliable

jaysouth
December 20, 2009, 05:24 PM
From a tree blind or in a vehicle, .357 would be fine. If I am on the ground face to face with a big boar, I want the biggest thing I can tote. .45 Long Colt with a 300 gr solids comes to mind.

From the side or rear, it doesn't take much to put a hog down. From the front, there is a lot of gristle and bone to defeat to hit a vital spot.

content
December 20, 2009, 05:26 PM
Hello friends and neighbors // I carry a 6" 357( did not notice this was autoloader my bad)

I think it is a good idea to carry a handgun that is legal to hunt with to avoid problems with DNR.
My choice: S&W 586 6" 357 ///It is a great woods handgun and with the longer barrel gives the best (IMHO) power and accuracy.
You also have the versatility of 357/38 in a wide variety of loads.

Nowadays you would have to get the S&W686 or Ruger GP100 or other. I checked out an 8 shot Taurus 608 with ventilated rib in 357 recently. Very light compared to my 586 but a nice revolve non the less.
good luck finding what works for you.

BlayGlock
December 20, 2009, 06:37 PM
I carried a .357 mag revolver until I got a Glock 29 in 10mm. I would feel comfortable with a 180 +p .40 S&W load but prefer a 10mm. A good .357 mag revolver makes a great wood gun, I suggest a Ruger GP100, I have a 3" fixed sight one that is pretty cool. I also have a S&W 327 trr8 from the performance center. It has a 5" barrel and hold 8 rounds.

Kingofthehill
December 20, 2009, 06:51 PM
10mm

Jason_G
December 20, 2009, 09:32 PM
I'd go 10mm, .45 ACP with +P, or .45 super. That being said, there are a whole lot more options for wheel guns.

Jason

bestseller92
December 20, 2009, 09:45 PM
I'd agree with the .40 being a minimum. I'm comfortable with the .357 in this role, with the size and temperament of the hogs that we have here in Oklahoma.

mrjohnston
December 20, 2009, 11:00 PM
I've carried a .40 and a .44 while hog hunting/tracking, but never had to shoot on with it. I always felt ok with the .40 but I had a buddy totin' a 12 ga. right beside me so it wasn't like I was alone. These day's I'd probably carry my .45 with FMJ/HP's alternated in the mag, just because.

bluetopper
December 20, 2009, 11:36 PM
I know this is the autoloading handgun forum but for the question you asked, the 44 Magnum is taylor made for your requirements. It also happens to be the ultimate reloaders caliber.

EdLaver
December 20, 2009, 11:40 PM
I've killed hogs with 180 FMJ .40 S&W loads, range being between 15-20 yards max.

eldon519
December 21, 2009, 12:32 AM
Depends how big of a hog. If it's like one of these semi-mythological 1000 lb Hogzillas, I might like something larger than .40.

In all reality though, I always liked the idea of a revolver for protection from dangerous game because I feel more confident you could fire off all your shots in a mauling-type situation, God forbid. If you've got an animal on top of you, and you're shooting and your slide hangs up on fur, clothing, flailing limbs, etc, fat chance you're gonna be able to reach over and clear the weapon. Perhaps it's not a realistic concern, but I've always though it was valid consideration.

LAK Supply
December 21, 2009, 01:14 AM
I would vote for the 10mm as well. Those 230gr hardcast rounds from DT penetrate like you wouldn't believe. Top end to top end the 10mm is a more powerful round than the 357 mag. You can also run 30rg heavier bullets in it... there is no reason to use a 357 instead of a 10mm.

If you're going with the wheelgun approach however, 41 and up will do better than the 10mm. You can get to mid-range 41 mag ballistics with the 10mm, and duplicate some of the off the shelf stuff 44 mag as well if you're using lighter bullet weights. If you're handloading (or buying DT or Buffalo Bore, etc) the upper end 41 and mid range and up 44 mag will do better. I've found that my G20 with a 6" match grade pipe (Jarvis) will penetrate nearly what my 44 mag will... 230gr vs 320gr. The 44 mag wins with about double the wound channel though... a lot of it is what you shoot best.

goodtime
December 21, 2009, 02:15 AM
For this application, you would do well to use the caliber with the largest cross-section, a heavy bullet, and the most powerful loading that you, yourself, can shoot ACCURATELY and QUICKLY on follow-up shots.

Teddyb
December 21, 2009, 08:38 AM
Is this a trick question?

benderx4
December 21, 2009, 09:53 AM
My vote is for a 44 magnum, in this scenario, bigger IS better. If a revolver is out of the question, then my vote goes to the 10mm.

hinton03
December 21, 2009, 10:49 AM
I have killed probably 15 wild pigs with a traditional bow. Never felt a need to have gun with me before the shot, but crawling on your hands and knees through thick brush following a wounded hog at night will cause you to pucker a bit.

Not sure there are any handguns that fit the bill for the situation I am faced with, but I stoke my Python with a max load behind 158 grain hard cast bullet. Gives me piece of mind if nothing else.

Big Bill
December 21, 2009, 02:51 PM
My vote is for a 44 magnum, in this scenario, bigger IS better. If a revolver is out of the question, then my vote goes to the 10mm. +1 - good advice.

Dr. Tad Hussein Winslow
December 21, 2009, 02:58 PM
No right or wrong answer, but to my way of thinking, a 4" revolver in .45 colt is the perfect pig/ black bear / cougar / rogue hillbilly woods sidearm. Also good for shooting your deer when directly under your stand and you cannot position your rifle. Keep 2 or 3 chambers with bird shot in case you encounter a snake or chattering squirrel. You can substitute .44 mag if you like. It's *almost* as good. :)

Gryffydd
December 21, 2009, 02:59 PM
Top end to top end the 10mm is a more powerful round than the 357 mag.
Not this one again... :banghead:
It's more powerful in that you have 15 or 16 of them on tap, but ballistically they're more or less tied--and that's quite the endorsement for the 10mm.

swinokur
December 21, 2009, 04:08 PM
10mm
What he said

mljdeckard
December 21, 2009, 05:44 PM
Think of it this way. Handguns are insufficient protection from human predators weighing about 200 lbs. We only carry them because rifles aren't practical to carry around everywhere.

There are hogs and there are hogs. How big are the big ones in your area? Running wild, with unlimited feed, they can easily exceed 200 lbs. And are at LEAST as dangerous as a charging human. If it were a human, I would want something bigger than regular defensive ammo. If it HAS to be a handgun, I'm thinking heavy revolver.

As it happens, I am in the process of getting a 10mm as a woods/hunting backup gun.

NMGonzo
December 21, 2009, 06:59 PM
.44 magnum just to be sure.

Gunfighter123
December 21, 2009, 07:15 PM
In a auto pistol = 10MM !!!!

In a revolver --- anything .357 or BIGGER !!!

m2steven
December 21, 2009, 11:05 PM
If i were a hog, i doubt i'd be able to afford a sidearm.

rkamp
December 21, 2009, 11:18 PM
I use to carry a pistol along with a center fire rifle (7mm-08/ .270) when hunting hogs. Lately I have been leaving my Delta Elite at camp due to the extra weight. When I trade the rifle for a fishing pole, it's nice to have a sidearm loaded with Double Tap 200gr XTP's at 1250 fps.

http://i120.photobucket.com/albums/o196/rkamp_111/IMG_0018.jpg

Gryffydd
December 21, 2009, 11:22 PM
If i were a hog, i doubt i'd be able to afford a sidearm.
Not to mention the difficulty of holding it and pulling the trigger with your hoof.
That's the first thing I thought of when I read the thread title too.

Patrice
December 22, 2009, 12:15 AM
.460 Rowland...you won't need the rifle or shotgun.--Patrice

Daddywagz
December 22, 2009, 09:08 PM
Many thanks to you all, I've got a clearer picture of what to get!

1SOW
December 22, 2009, 09:57 PM
I've only fired a friends 44 Auto-Mag, but it should work fine if you can carry it.

LAK Supply
December 23, 2009, 04:29 PM
Not this one again...
It's more powerful in that you have 15 or 16 of them on tap, but ballistically they're more or less tied--and that's quite the endorsement for the 10mm.

Not this one again... 10mm will edge out the 357 mag, and it's not "giving a lot to the 10mm." I'm not saying it's significant, which is why "edge" was the word. I simply stated that there's no reason to use a 357mag in place of a 10mm, especially if the OP wants to use an auto.

Hot 10mm loads will edge out the 357mag (I'm using 200gr hardcasts as a reference) by 50-100fps. Also, the 357 will not handle the 230gr bullets the 10mm will.

Dr_2_B
December 23, 2009, 10:05 PM
It seems lately the 10mm is the favorite as a backup sidearm for hogs.

CZ223
December 23, 2009, 10:17 PM
and I've been interested in the 10mm since Don Johnson carried a Bren 10 in Miami vice. So I now I have a great reason to buy a Dan Wesson in 10mm.:D

Quoheleth
December 23, 2009, 10:52 PM
.41 Blackhawk with 215grain lead semi wadcutters.

I got it for just this purpose.

And now my friend with the deer & hog lease lost the lease, so I've got a gun and no hogs to hunt. :(

Q

bigmike45
December 24, 2009, 07:56 AM
My custom 4" stainless Redhawk in .41mag loaded with my favorite handloads, 265gr. lead flatpoints. I have taken several hogs with that load and it really does the trick. I am sure my 5" 1911 with some hot .45acp handloads might work as good, but I know the Redhawk will not fail me.
http://i44.photobucket.com/albums/f43/mike_seale/HPIM0734.jpg

Quoheleth
December 24, 2009, 08:32 AM
^
Showoff :neener:

Good looking gun, Mike.

Q

hinton03
December 24, 2009, 10:00 AM
Big Mike,

Very nice; what custom work did you have done and who did it?

Thanks

Peter M. Eick
December 25, 2009, 01:32 PM
I have used my 10mm on feral hogs in south texas. It works well, but next time I will go with my 357 SuperMag and some 200 grn slugs. Some of those hogs took more shots then I would have liked to take.

MicrometerMike
December 25, 2009, 09:49 PM
10mm hands down auto pistol, 44 or 41 mag in a revolver.

gazzmann
December 25, 2009, 11:20 PM
I usually carry my Desert Eagle 44 mag.

19-3Ben
December 25, 2009, 11:22 PM
Not this one again... 10mm will edge out the 357 mag, and it's not "giving a lot to the 10mm." I'm not saying it's significant, which is why "edge" was the word. I simply stated that there's no reason to use a 357mag in place of a 10mm, especially if the OP wants to use an auto.

Hot 10mm loads will edge out the 357mag (I'm using 200gr hardcasts as a reference) by 50-100fps. Also, the 357 will not handle the 230gr bullets the 10mm will.


Interesting. Out of curiosity, how does the sectional density of a 200gr. .357mag load compare to that of the 230gr 10mm load?

I just found DT's 200gr .357 load. That's some big medicine. (http://www.doubletapammo.com/php/catalog/product_info.php?cPath=21_27&products_id=337)

ECVMatt
December 25, 2009, 11:22 PM
Another vote for the 10mm in an auto loader. I have taken several hogs with my Glock 20 and it works great. We captured them with dogs first, so the shots were at very close range. I used Double Tap 200 JHP's. The hogs did not like it.

I like the 20 because it is relatively light, accurate, and is pretty indestructable.

If you like wheel guns, anything .357 + is going to work. If this is your first handgun, then stick to the .357, practice with .38 spl. and have fun. I like Ruger Blackhawks and GP-100's for the same reasons I like the Glock 20, weight excepted.

Have fun killing hogs.

Matt

LAK Supply
December 26, 2009, 01:44 AM
Interesting. Out of curiosity, how does the sectional density of a 200gr. .357mag load compare to that of the 230gr 10mm load?

I just found DT's 200gr .357 load. That's some big medicine.

Looks like the .357 has better sectional density... about .224 compared to .205... kind of a given for the smaller diameter.

Heavier bullet vs better SD... similar penetration with the .400 diameter probably creating a larger wound channel. I have both offerings from DT including the 200gr for the 10mm as well. The 200gr hardcasts shoot very well from my 686, and both of my 10mm's eat the 200 and 230gr hardcasts with no issues. From what I can tell the .357 vs 10mm is similar to the 10mm vs 44 mag (I have DT's 320gr .44 mag loads as well)... they all seem to penetrate similarly with the wound channels growing larger with the larger diameters. There is a noticeable difference between the wound channel from the 357 and 10mm, and the 44 mag probably has close to double the wound channel size as the 10mm.

bigmike45
December 26, 2009, 08:24 AM
hinton03,

The barrel was cut from 5.5" to 4", recrowned to factory standards, new front sight channel machined into barrel top strap and sight installed, billboard on the barrel on the opposite side removed, grip corners radiused and factory grips reworked to match. Gun completely dehorned and single action revolver chamfer performed on front of cylinder and mirror polish, all but sear surfaces on trigger group parts. I did all the work myself including the cutting and machining of the barrel. The last thing did was to give the gun a brushed finish using purple Scotch-Brite pads. The gun was the lesser of the two have as far as accuracy goes....since recrowning the barrel, that has changed. The nice thing about the front sight is it has replaceable blades for height & style and I put in the one that brings the point of impact dead on to the point of aim at 15 yards. I carry it in the field in a DeSantis OWB holster with an extra speed loader.
http://i44.photobucket.com/albums/f43/mike_seale/NewHolster1s.jpg

I have since found a set of the Uncle Mikes/Butler Creek grips that reall help me to hold on when I am shooting my hot handloads.
http://i44.photobucket.com/albums/f43/mike_seale/4inchRight.jpg
http://i44.photobucket.com/albums/f43/mike_seale/4inchLeft.jpg

Thank you Quoheleth!!! I am very proud of it.

RSVP2RIP
December 26, 2009, 09:36 AM
I think that if you are hunting with a rifle, why not use the rifle to shoot the hog? Seems that the pistol is a last ditch weapon in any case, and having any would be better than your knife. Use a good, reliable, repeating rifle in a large enough caliber and you won't even have to clean the handgun. I believe this "man eating, bulletproof pig" crap is blown out of proportion anyways. If it's that dangerous, why don't you have a backup like hunting african dangerous game or brown bear. I've seen video of a pig on the "warpath" and the guys just lifted themselves into a handy tree and the pig ran away. It didn't come after them with fire in its eyes and chew the tree in half to get them. It seemed like it was more intent on getting the hell out of there. But, what the hell do I know, all the pigs around here are for bacon and live in pens.

hinton03
December 26, 2009, 01:02 PM
Super job Big Mike; I went online and looked at Reeder and Hamilton packages for the Redhawk, looks like I found my next project gun. I wish I could do it myself but no skills.

bigmike45
December 26, 2009, 04:33 PM
I think that if you are hunting with a rifle, why not use the rifle to shoot the hog? Seems that the pistol is a last ditch weapon in any case, and having any would be better than your knife. Use a good, reliable, repeating rifle in a large enough caliber and you won't even have to clean the handgun. I believe this "man eating, bulletproof pig" crap is blown out of proportion anyways. If it's that dangerous, why don't you have a backup like hunting african dangerous game or brown bear. I've seen video of a pig on the "warpath" and the guys just lifted themselves into a handy tree and the pig ran away. It didn't come after them with fire in its eyes and chew the tree in half to get them. It seemed like it was more intent on getting the hell out of there. But, what the hell do I know, all the pigs around here are for bacon and live in pens.

RSVP2RIP,
When I hunt with a rifle, I still have this gun on my hip. Even the best rifle can jam or have a squib load or while trying to get up that tree you speak of, you happen to drop the rifle sinc you are in a hurry. I also bowhunt and the arrow definately does not have the terminal shock that the gun does. Hunting with a handgun is a challenge, just like any other, moreso than some. I have enjoyed harvesting game for over 40 years with one and will continue to challenge myself doing so while I physically can. If it were just a matter of shooting the animal and walking away.....there are places you can do that as well, from the comfort of a climate controled blind, and you never touch the animal until the cooking begins back at home. Not my cup of tea to say the least.
RSVP2RIP...you need to make a trip down to Texas and have a go with a 300lb Russian Boar. No.....they dont gnaw down the tree to get to you, but if you dont get up in time or dont get off a shot, which is much easier with a large caliber handgun in some situations, you can be hurt and/or even killed. A quick example which is not unusual.
A friend of mine books/guides bowhunting hog hunts on the famed King Ranch in south Texas. The hogs hunted there are mostly javelina, roughly 75-100lbs, some with razor sharp 4"-6" tusks. A guy who had never hunted this way was out stalking them on his own. He happened upon a big male, no more than 10' away, that started snapping his teeth together, a sign of aggression, and this guy, a seasoned bowhunter, turned and ran, with the hog chasing him. He tripped and fell forward and the javelina ran up his back and bit him at the base of the skull and ran over his head leaving the scalp like a peeled orange. It literally scalped him from back to front and over 200 stiches and some rabies treatments later the guy is medically ok. The javelina obviously felt threatened and defended itself. Since there can be no rifles on these hunts, they are allowed to carry handguns for rattlers and such. This guy chose not to do so. Had he carried one, things might have been a little different.

bigmike45

TIMC
December 26, 2009, 05:30 PM
My sidearm of choice for pigs is the Kimber Warrior loaded with 230 graim FMJ ammo. I have no problems putting down a pig with mine and I have killed a lot of them.
These three were from last weekend, 1 shot each from my warrior.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v369/timc/PigsDec222009.jpg?t=1261866521

hinton03
December 26, 2009, 07:13 PM
Nice load of pork TIMC; looks like you will have freezer full of breakfast sausage.

RH45
December 27, 2009, 07:32 AM
Although I've seen ads on TV showing hogs dropped with one shot with a .177 air rifle, my personal experiance is that a hog has no central, nervous system, and doesn't know when it SHOULD be dead.

The first hog I shot, was at 65 yards, with a .44 magnum. I had a perfect, broadside shot, and tagged it right behind the shoulder. It only jumped, as if starteled, and turned around, giving me a broadside shot at the other shoulder, which I took. It then ran, full speed, straight up a hill, about 50 yards before it dropped over. When skinning it out, both shots were right where they should have been. It was dead, but, didn't know it.

The second one I took was with a .454 Casull, loaded with Swift, A-frame bullets. Every time I shot it, it went down, but, then jumped back up. I ended up empting the gun it to it, before it stayed down. My 4th shot was at a front shoulder. I didn't know if the .454 had enough power to break it, but, I thought that if it did, that SHOULD stop it. The hog did go down, and the shoulder was broken, but, the hog didn't stay down. When we skinned that one out, 4 out of the 5 shots in to it, were killing shots. The exception was the shoulder shot which just broke the shoulder, and didn't have enough power to break the spine.

My point is, would I carry an autoloader as a "backup"? No, I would want less weight to get my a$$ up a tree ASAP!!

Water-Man
December 27, 2009, 08:55 AM
.44mag and heavy .45 Colt are the best bets IMO if you can handle them!

snooperman
December 27, 2009, 09:16 AM
My wife and I have killed more wild hogs with the .357 magnum than I can remember over the past 46 years. I use a Ruger blackhawk and she uses a S&W model 19.

RSVP2RIP
December 27, 2009, 04:19 PM
Even the best rifle can jam or have a squib load or while trying to get up that tree you speak of, you happen to drop the rifle sinc you are in a hurry.

It is still faster to work the action than draw another gun. Thats why when after dangerous game you don't take a single shot if you are by yourself. Given the choice, shoot or tree, which one would be better/faster? If you genuinely fear your life, shooting a pig in self defence would require a lot less paperwork than shooting a person in self defense. The OP said rifle huntingwith a rifle, not a bow, which I agree is a different situation.

mordechaianiliewicz
December 27, 2009, 04:25 PM
.357 Magnum.

bigmike45
December 27, 2009, 07:57 PM
Nice Shootin TMIC. Looks like the sausage making is just around the corner with the cold weather upon us.

bigmike45

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