Cheapest centerfire rifle caliber to shoot?


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NelsErik
December 26, 2009, 12:03 AM
I want to get into shooting benchrest and reloading. I've never reloaded anything. What rifle round will be the cheapest to shoot? I would like to get a Savage with the Accu-trigger and Accu-stock, bolt action or an ar-15/10 setup. What caliber should I look for? I'll mostly do target practice in the desert, but could hunt varmints or deer. What about reloading equipment?

I would like to be able to shoot a lot so cost per bullet is important. I would rather spend my money on the gun versus per shot.

I currently shoot about a 500 rnds of 9mm and 1,000 rnds of .22 a week.

Thanks,

Nels Erik

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cbrgator
December 26, 2009, 12:07 AM
.223

fireman 9731
December 26, 2009, 12:10 AM
I want to get into shooting benchrest and reloading

.223 will probably be the cheapest with the requirements you listed.

If you just want a centerfire round to blast and have fun with, 7.62x39 in an AK and 7.62x54 in a Mosin Nagant is dirt cheap with surplus ammo. Reloading and pretty good accuracy are possible with these calibers, but not nearly as cheap or easy as the .223.

WNTFW
December 26, 2009, 12:48 AM
Smaller caliber generally means less powder and less lead. You won't save a whole lot of money when using highend bullets though. You will load about 100 more rounds per pound of powder with .223 vs .308. So that is about $8.00 a hundred rounds. You can figure it out closer depending on particular load & powder.

Look at F Class T/R it is probably the easiest thing to start in in terms of equipment requirements. The 2 rounds for the class are .223 & .308. Both have target & hunting bullets available. Just make sure .223 is legal for what you want to hunt in your area.

Look at which calibers are dominating benchrest if that is what you want to do. Some calibers don't have great barrel life so take that into account.

I'd go single stage and put the money into a giraud trimmer for reloading equip.

Sunray
December 26, 2009, 12:48 AM
"...shooting benchrest..." There's benchrest shooting and shooting from a bench. Ain't the same thing. Reloading and the rifles used are totally different for both. I'm guessing you mean shooting off a bench.
Buy a copy of The ABC's of Reloading first.
"...could hunt varmints or deer..." Varmints, yes, but the .223 isn't legal for deer, everywhere. Check your local hunting regs.
A Savage rifle will do nicely, but the chambering is important if you want a varmint and deer rifle. Their Model 11 FCNS in .223 will do nicely. Has the rifling twist for heavy bullets. 70ish grains depending on the bullet construction. The same rifle in .243 would be a better choice. You still have to use the right bullet though. .243 ammo comes in varmint and deer sized game bullets. Deer bullets are usually 85 grains and up. There's no reason not to use deer bullets for varmints. Shooting varmints is great practice for deer season.
The .223 will kill deer, but the bullet used and rifling twist is critical. Varmint bullets are designed to expand rapidly upon impact with little penetration. Varmint bullets are NOT suitable for deer sized game. Deer sized game requires penetration with controlled expansion. .223 bullets must be made for deer sized game. Think heavy bullets. The rifling twist must be for heavy bullets too. A fast twist is good for heavy bullets. The Savage 1 in 9 will do nicely.

kk0g
December 26, 2009, 01:19 AM
You're wise to consider bullet cost as the determining factor in keeping reloading expenses down. Keep your choices down to something that can shoot either the .223 or .308 caliber bulk bullets that are marketed to varmint/target shooters and you're in business.

NWCP
December 26, 2009, 06:03 AM
The least expensive centerfire cartridge I've found to be the .223. The 7.62x39 may be less expensive, but I've yet to a hunting rifle that is all that accurate when chambered in the 7.62x39. I have a bolt action CZ in .223 so I'm not at the range playing like Rambo and seeing how many rounds I can burn up in an afternoon so the .223 works well for me. I t makes for a heck of a varmint/predator rifle as well as a fun paper puncher.

Uncle Mike
December 26, 2009, 08:48 AM
I want to get into shooting benchrest and reloading.

The discipline itself dictates the caliber, the cost is secondary. Decide what part of 'benchrest' type of shooting your going to do, then chose your caliber accordingly.
As for the 223 for long range(1000y) work...NO!
You will need a dedicated benchrest quality round...and rifle.

If on the other hand your just going to play at it...shoot off a bench, the 223 is great, it can be accurate and comparatively speaking is relatively cheap to use.

Sounds to me you want to bang around a lot, as you said. The 223 will be excellent for that.

However...I don't care how many stories abound of the awesomeness of the 223 for dispatching deer sized animals.....NO!
As Sunray said, it is not a good choice for deer! Period!

Your choice in the Savage rifle is spot on, the Savage design lends itself to higher levels of accuracy while being less expensive to manufacture than some of the other designs, The 1:7 twist would benefit you for the longer and heavier bullets you will need to use in the 223 for distance shooting.

Look into the '12 series of the Savage line...the 12LRPV(p/n18145) 223 1:7.
the 12VLP(p/n18464) 223 1:7.

There are many slower twist 223's available from Savage also if you intend to use shorter, lighter bullets.

Remington offers many excellent rifles chambered in the 223, but none with anything faster than a 1:9(unless custom shop or 40X stuff), which would be good enough, unless, like I say, your going long with longer and heavier bullets.Side note: Remington has suffered from shoddy quality as of late...FYI.

MMCSRET
December 26, 2009, 08:53 AM
Probably 223 Remington and handload using your own handcast lead bullets and surplus WCC844 or WCC846 powder. Opens up a whole new avenue of time consumption and aggravation; FUN,FUN,FUN!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

NelsErik
December 26, 2009, 11:17 AM
Hey Guys,
Thanks for the information. Maybe I should expand on my question a little. My dad and brothers shoot "benchrest", a lot! We have about 50 acres in the Arizona desert and have our own range. It has targets at set every 200 yards out to 1,000 yards and every 500 yards out to 2,500 yards. To become "one of the family" you have to hit the 600 target 8/10 times.

My best is 5/10 with my brothers 6.5 grendel. My dad just started shooting 6.5 Creedmoor with a semi-custom Savage, but he can hit all the targets pretty easily with whatever he wants. They shoot a lot of .50 BMG too. I won't get to shoot the .50 until I can hit the target 8/10, that's one of the rules.

My dad and my three brothers were all in the military and my youngest brother just got back from Afghanistan. He lost his right leg. We use to be pretty tight and do a lot of things together. Now all he wants to do is shoot. The deal is pretty much this, if you can't hit the target 8/10 they won't talk to you about anything, including rifles and reloading. Once you hit the target you are "in". My older brother Kelly just got his on Christmas Eve. They might be at the range for four or five hours and only fire the guns 15 times, but hit the bullseye probably 12/15.

Sorry for the incomplete original post. I'm looking for a long range round that I can reload the cheapest. I have $2,500 set a side for the gun and optics, although I was going to try to use the Leupold VX-3L off my .22-250 at first. The Leupold VX-3L is just dumb on the .22-250 and my dad laughs at me when I use.

Thanks,
Nels Erik

Redneck with a 40
December 26, 2009, 11:22 AM
I agree with the consensus, .223! This is a solid 300 yard cartridge, very effective on cyote size small game and its just plain fun to shoot. I'm reloading 55 gr Hornady SP's, Remington brass, H-4895, and Wolf SRM primers for 22 cents/round.:D

Feel free to compare the factory stuff at $1/round.:D

Coltdriver
December 26, 2009, 12:01 PM
The 300 Whisper is very stingy with powder and will let you get out to 600 yards. You can use the 240 grain sierra match kings for long range and shoot anything from rabbits to deer with a 150-165 grain bullet. Works great as an AR 15 Upper.

An unlikely consideration is a 45-70. You could shoot all the way out to a mile on reasonable powder charges. Also great for closer in work but not the kind of round you will routinely colverleaf with at much over 100 yards!

Redneck with a 40
December 26, 2009, 12:32 PM
For 500-800 meters, look at the 260 Remington, although its a specialized cartridge, limited bullets and brass supply. The .308 is also great at this range, I can reload it for 45 cents/round, the bullet styles and weights are mind boggling, ammo availability is really good and its proven. I think the .308 would serve you very nicely.

berettashotgun
December 26, 2009, 04:49 PM
Get a 308 based case and choose 6 - 6.5 - 7mm bullets. 243,6mm rem, 260 rem, 7mm-08
All excellent for what you want to do.
I'd MUCH rather have a 6XC chambering for performance vs. reloading/shooting cost but the initial cash outlay is ridiculous.
A 223 with a 1-7 twist is nice, but those 70+gr bullets for the 22 are pretty high; actually in the same price range as the 7mm target grade bullets from Berger or Sierra. Nosler makes some sweet 224 bullets and a 105(?)gr 6mm match bullet. I bought some of the 6mm/243 Noslers, but have yet to try them.
Not much of a difference in these cost-per-round AFTER the dies. Loaded rounds per pound of powder tilts in favor of a smaller case. duh:rolleyes:
Powder and primers are at an all time high right now, I'd check availability of these components and include that in my process.
The Savage "seems" to be a fair rifle value in their target models, and the barrel cost and ease of changing them makes for more value in a rifle.
I do NOT own a Savage centerfire, but have the muzzleloader and will say that accu-trigger is the best factory trigger I have purchased on a "MADE IN THE USA" rifle. That trigger is more meaningful for accuracy than a lot of stuff for sale now days.
You have a pretty cool Dad. Consider yourself lucky; he might seem like a hard-a$$ at times - but you will get some good lessons on the cheap.
You did say something about saving money - right?

Erik M
December 26, 2009, 04:54 PM
varmit/target = .223
blasting/plinking/close range target = 7.62x39

and you can get a Saiga chambered in either of those calibers n.i.b. for less than $400.

memphisjim
December 26, 2009, 05:03 PM
5.45x39mm

Brimic
December 26, 2009, 05:07 PM
As far as reloading goes, brass is the most expensive component, but it can be reused. The next most expensive is the bullet. Long range .224" bullets in the 75-90 gr range aren't that much cheaper than 6mm or 6.5mm bullets. You are talking a couple of cents per round difference if that. Primers cost about the same. You'll use about 1/2 as much powder in a .223 than in a 260 rem or .243, but once again, you are talking about a few cents per load. When you move up tot .30 calibers the price goes up a bit more.

I would go with a .243/260rem/7mm-08, or one of the various other 6.5mm chamberings.

NelsErik
December 26, 2009, 06:49 PM
So the Creedmoor might be a good option? Anyone reload Creedmoor? About how much per round does it work out to? My dad's new Savage in Creedmoor cost him just over $1,200 with everything but the scope.

rangerruck
December 26, 2009, 07:09 PM
22 hornet or 17 fireball, if reloading, and want to keep bench/varmint shooting to 300 yds or less. heck you could do both; they both use the hornet case, just necked down for the 17.
then get a savage or 2, with the new accustock, and heavy bbl, and you will be good to go.
for 5 to 600 yds, you could do a 223, but anything between 6 and 762mm would be better.
Heck I think a nice 6.5 would be good ; either a grendel or a 260. a 270 would work great as well, but if we want 308 cases, then a 243, 7.08 or 260 is it. In a 30.06 case, a 6.5.06, 270, 280, or even a plane jane 30.06 will get you there, easy.
I think out to 600 yds, the idea of the grendel, maybe the easiest on the shoulder, and the cheapest to reload, using the smallest brass and the smallest amount of powder.

rangerruck
December 26, 2009, 07:20 PM
... of course, the more I read, a 300 whisper... hmmm... very interesting.

PT1911
December 26, 2009, 07:32 PM
I go with the .223 crowd.... my cz 527 varmint and RRA long range setup are a HOOT to shoot and extremely accurate to boot with CHEAP PMC ammo... I cannot wait to actually work up some loads for both of them. should be quite capable out to 3-400 yds.

Smith357
December 26, 2009, 09:18 PM
I cast my own bullets so I make .38 special loads that cost about 6 cents each. For my rifles I cast .38-55 .45-70 and some low power .30-06. Since I get my lead free from a friend my biggest expense is primers and powder. I think my costs were right around $20 for 150 rounds of .45-70, They use a lot of powder.

rizbunk77
December 26, 2009, 09:24 PM
I would be wary of 223 because of component availability at times.

RonE
December 27, 2009, 01:47 AM
If you can't decide between a bench rest rifle and an AR 15, you might consider a rifle chambered in 7.62 X 54R (Mousin Naugant). Just rebarrel the action and do a little home gunsmithing and you will have a rifle that is cheap to own, cheap to shoot and easy to reload.

If the cost of bullets is a consideration then accuracy is not a consideration. If accuracy is of primary importance then the cost of bullets is either secondary or no consideration at all.

gazzmann
December 27, 2009, 11:05 AM
223, 308, 30-06, 7.62 x 54
Small to large. ammo almost available most of the time.
I like a 25-06 but ammo is tough to find sometimes and getting expensive.

natman
December 27, 2009, 12:03 PM
223 without question. You might be able to save a few pennies on powder shooting 22 Hornet if you reload exclusively, but the huge difference in factory ammo prices makes the 223 the clear winner.

berettashotgun
December 27, 2009, 01:08 PM
**We have about 50 acres in the Arizona desert and have our own range. It has targets at set every 200 yards out to 1,000 yards and every 500 yards out to 2,500 yards. To become "one of the family" you have to hit the 600 target 8/10 times**

The parameters dictate a bigger bullet and case than a 22 caliber; 308 case powder capacity really stretches the upper limit of his target range.
The more I read his needs for the ranges indicated leads me to look at a 30-06 case; more than likely with a bullet with a minimum of a 0.500+ B.C.
I'm thinking a 280 AI is needed to make this a legitimate contender.
Most EVERY mentioned caliber (except the beloved HORNET) is good out to 500 YARDS.
My first centerfire was a 22 hornet, but I know it is no 300+ yard caliber with the lightweight bullet required to work good.
Purchasing a rifle in a over matched caliber is not in the best interest of fiscal restraints.
The poor guy will spend 2X as much just getting to the 700 yard mark.

NelsErik
December 27, 2009, 03:00 PM
The parameters dictate a bigger bullet and case than a 22 caliber; 308 case powder capacity really stretches the upper limit of his target range.
The more I read his needs for the ranges indicated leads me to look at a 30-06 case; more than likely with a bullet with a minimum of a 0.500+ B.C.
I'm thinking a 280 AI is needed to make this a legitimate contender.
Most EVERY mentioned caliber (except the beloved HORNET) is good out to 500 YARDS.
My first centerfire was a 22 hornet, but I know it is no 300+ yard caliber with the lightweight bullet required to work good.
Purchasing a rifle in a over matched caliber is not in the best interest of fiscal restraints.
The poor guy will spend 2X as much just getting to the 700 yard mark.

Thanks for noticing that. It's my fault though, because I didn't post all the requirements in the original post.

I'm currently trying to figure out how much it's going to cost me to reload 6.5 Creedmoor. I can basically just order the same Savage that my dad got converted to Creedmoor. My brother Kelly made his shots with my brothers Grendel and is looking at an Alexander Arms AR setup. I don't have that much money to spend and would rather learn how to shoot long distance and spend my money on ammo!

funnelcake
December 27, 2009, 11:44 PM
A couple of important input items are missing (unless I missed them):

1. What size target are you required to tag 8 out of 10 times @ 600-yd's.?
2. Which Leupold VX-3L? While I probably wouldn't laugh at any of these on any .22-250, one of the higher magnification models could be fine for your 600+ yard quest.

Regardless, .308...unless you're really going to use for varmits, deer-size game & "benchrest" shooting. Given those req's & the fact that $2500 bucks is hardly a pauper's budget, how about a semi-custom .260 Remington? Snag whichever Savage .308 varmint or tacti-cool rifle is cheapest (likely around $550-bucks) & have a good gunsmith fit up one of Shilen's Savage drop-in barrel's. An Accustock model may even save bedding, etc.

If necessary, drop $6-700 bucks on optics (one of the big 'ole 30mm Leupold's or Pentax Lightseeker's), get a quantity of really good brass, bullet's, and some quality reloading gear. All told probably ~$2000-grand or so. Pratice a bunch and hit the target 10 for 10...screw 8/10. Good thing about a .260; you can buy off-the-shelf ammo cheap & good enough for varmints or deer & save the precision reloads for the really distant targets.

Funnel

jbech123
December 28, 2009, 12:22 AM
and you can get a Saiga chambered in either of those calibers n.i.b. for less than $400
true, but the words "saiga" and "benchrest" cannot be used in the same sentence. I think there may even be a law against it...lol
Seriously one of his main initial goals was to tag a target 8/10 at 600 yards. Unless the target was a house, the saiga would lead to more frustration than enjoyment. The saiga is fine for what it is, but it is not a precision rifle.

jbech123
December 28, 2009, 12:32 AM
To become "one of the family" you have to hit the 600 target 8/10 times.
This could be real easy or real hard...how big is the target?
I was going to try to use the Leupold VX-3L off my .22-250 at first. The Leupold VX-3L is just dumb on the .22-250 and my dad laughs at me when I use
Why is it dumb? It's an excellent scope. Seems kinda silly that they supposedly have all this knowledge and you have to ask about something as basic as caliber selection on the internet. I don't know how old you are but if you want to get into this "club", if your 22-250 is a decent quality rifle, I'd slap the vx-3l on it and start practicing. A decent quality rifle with that scope will get the job done as well as anything at 600. Other calibers are better as ranges get farther than that, but plenty of folks shoot a 223 out to 600 just fine which shoots the same bullet several hundred fps slower.

NelsErik
December 28, 2009, 12:49 AM
The target is a 6" diameter circle of steel. The reason I have to ask here is because they won't help me at all until I get the 8/10.

My brother Kelly and I just moved back from Chicago to be with our brother. Since losing the leg and getting back he's been really bad so dad had us all move back. I just turned 35 and have never even been deer hunting. Lots of small game, but no deer. I have 9mm CZ that I'm very good with, a .22lr, and the .22-250. Dad laughs at my .22-250 with the scope because he says it's way to much scope. Not sure in the model of the scope, but it says "long range" on the side.

BornAgainBullseye
December 28, 2009, 01:19 AM
8x57 mauser and 7.62x54 russian bolt action rifles. Assuming you are blasting surplus. Then Russian 5.45 followed by 7.62x39, then .223 as far as ammo prices. The rifles are Mosin Nagant by far the cheapest. Mausers are getting hard to find good surplus so prices are getting out of hand. Then the AK followed by about everything else.

FLNT4EVR
December 28, 2009, 09:40 AM
I would give my vote to the 223,especially if you reload.I have collected a couple thousand once fired caseings at the range this past summer and they are all good reloadable brands.I don't reload the military brass because of the crimped primer pockets. Good free brass saves a lot. Bulk FMJ bullets can be had for about $10 a hundred, and Powder Valley sells Wolf small rifle primers for $25.50 per thousand.Shop around for the best price on powder and your good to go.

jbech123
December 28, 2009, 09:54 AM
8x57 mauser and 7.62x54 russian bolt action rifles. Assuming you are blasting surplus. Then Russian 5.45 followed by 7.62x39, then .223 as far as ammo prices. The rifles are Mosin Nagant by far the cheapest. Mausers are getting hard to find good surplus so prices are getting out of hand. Then the AK followed by about everything else.
All horrible choices for hitting a 6" target at 600 yards. I'm not saying it couldn't be done, but if the guys goal is to hit a 6" steel target at 600, and he has easy access to targets out to 2500 yards, these choices are ill suited at best. I'd be willing to bet against david tubb hitting a 6" target at 600 yards with an AK in 7.62x39.

jbech123
December 28, 2009, 09:56 AM
The reason I have to ask here is because they won't help me at all until I get the 8/10.
Well the bright side is, when you can hit a 6" target at 600 8 out of 10 times, you'll likely no longer need their help:-)

rangerruck
December 28, 2009, 10:53 AM
WOW!!! that just narrowed things up quite a bit; you need speed and good b.c.'s from bullets- I would eliminate everything else, and look for something between 6 and 7mm bullets, to give you the best chance.
You are shooting for MOA out to 600 yds... that will be a challenge, so call
back, with pics, and let us know how it goes.

NelsErik
December 28, 2009, 11:13 AM
rangerruck WOW!!! that just narrowed things up quite a bit; you need speed and good b.c.'s from bullets- I would eliminate everything else, and look for something between 6 and 7mm bullets, to give you the best chance.
You are shooting for MOA out to 600 yds... that will be a challenge, so call
back, with pics, and let us know how it goes.

I'll probably end up going the 6.5 Grendel, 6.5 Creedmoor, or maybe the .260. Will they all be about the same cost reloading wise or is one a lot cheaper than the other. I need lots of practice! Is one of those calibers a stand out versus the others?

gondorian
December 28, 2009, 12:13 PM
6.5 Grendel is based off the 7.62x39 case used in the AK, whereas the .260 Remington is based off the 7.62x51 (.308 winchester) and as such has a greater case capacity and will be able to send the same bullets faster than the 6.5 grendel. The 6.5 creedmoor is fairly similar to the .260 Rem. but has a slightly smaller case capacity and is likely to be somewhat more expensive. The major strong point of the 6.5 grendel is that is will fit in magazine that will fit in an AR-15 magazine well. If you want an accurate AR for fairly long range the 6.5 grendel is one of the best. There are companies besides Alexander Arms that make 6.5 Ar's for pretty cheap, like J&T or model1. However, in terms of accuracy, you will probably be better served by buying a bolt gun in .260 of 6.5 creedmoor. I don't really know which would be cheapest to reload but I would guess that 6.5 Grendel would be cheapest followed by 260 rem and 6.5 creedmoor.
Have fun shooting.

cal74
December 28, 2009, 12:18 PM
223 without question. You might be able to save a few pennies on powder shooting 22 Hornet if you reload exclusively, but the huge difference in factory ammo prices makes the 223 the clear winner.


Don't think I've scene the price of brass mentioned anywhere, you can pick up .223 brass cheaper than anything else. There's cheaper .22 centerfire rounds to shoot as far as powder goes, but the Hornets aren't great on brass life and you won't be able to find brass in large qty's.

.17's are powder misers, but you'll pay around 50.00 bucks for a hundred brass intially


Bulk .22 bullets aren't to hard to find either for reasonable prices.

gondorian
December 28, 2009, 12:22 PM
Hello everybody, I'm just reminding you the OP NEEDS moa at 600yds, and is able to shoot out to 1000yds and beyond.

LeonCarr
December 28, 2009, 01:20 PM
I think your brothers are just flat out being mean for not helping you in your quest for MOA accuracy at 600 yards. You don't just wake up one morning and hit a 6 inch steel plate at 600 yards. It takes a well put together rifle, above average ammunition, and an above average shooter who practices a lot. If you have 2500 bucks to spend, my pick for you would be a Remington 700 or heavy barrelled Savage bolt action in .308, Leupold Optics (I like the 4.5x14 models myself), good heavy duty scope mounts, good sandbag type rests, and use the rest of the money for a handloading setup. The first factory load I would try would be the Federal Gold Medal loaded with the 175 grain Sierra Matchking Bullet. That setup, with the right shooter will hit the 6 inch steel plate 8 out of 10 times, and will allow you to talk to your brothers about long range shooting.

Just my .02,
LeonCarr

Dr. Tad Hussein Winslow
December 28, 2009, 01:41 PM
Oh, the parameters are now shooting at 1,000 yards; cheapest chambering to shoot? Changes everything. The answer then is something in 6.5mm or 6mm if you are reloading. Obviously, 6mm bullets are cheaper than the 6.5mm bullets, due to less metal used in them. So if reloading, then I'd say 6mm Remington, .243 Win, or similar. If you go to a 6.5, then 6.5x55 swedish, 6.5-.284 Norma or similar. BUT, if you're calculating barrel replacement cost into the "cheapest" calculation, and you're shooting a lot, as you say you do, then that also changes things, and weighs in favor of a 6.5mm round, particularly the not-too-overbore ones, such as .260 Rem, 6.5x47, 6.5 Creedmoor, or 6.5x55 swedish.

.25-'06 wouldn't be a horrible way to get to 1K either - pretty cheap bullets, but not enough quality and BC built into them perhaps to do this.

If you're not reloading, then the answer is .308 Win, regardless of whether you factor in barrel replacement costs or not into the "cheapest" calculation.

beefstew
December 31, 2009, 10:21 AM
Hey man, I have no idea about caliber etc, but my brother has been in AfPak for the past 6 months. Reading the news and the erratic communication from him drives me crazy. I'm glad your brother made it back - I hope he get through the re-adjustment!

wishin
December 31, 2009, 11:47 AM
.223 or .243/6mm.

NelsErik
December 31, 2009, 12:06 PM
Thanks everyone for the suggestions and wishes for my bro. I ordered a Savage in 6.5 Creedmoor. They are putting a on heavy bull barrel on it for me from Shilen. They originally want to do the barrel through Savage, but the cost was a lot more than the Shilen. I was going to just buy a Savage and then have it sent to a smith to get a new barrel, but Savage was actually pretty interested in doing the entire gun for me. I chose Creedmore because I know that is what my dad is using and he already has the dies and ton of brass for it. I'm still trying to figure out what scope to put on it, probably a Leupold of some type. I still have about $1,600 left of my original budget. I want to pay for the scope and hopefully reloading equipment with that.

Also, does anyone know of any Benchrest type competitions around Arizona. I would like to try to get my entire family involved if I can.

skoro
December 31, 2009, 12:16 PM
Probably .223/5.56mm on a regular basis. Special sales might be less on other calibers from time to time.

It's a great varmint round and also for plinking/targets at ranges much greater than rimfire can give you.

JustinL
December 31, 2009, 12:17 PM
You have time to fire 1500 rounds per week? Assuming you sleep 8h per night that averages 1 shot every 5 minutes or so.

NelsErik
December 31, 2009, 12:36 PM
JustinL You have time to fire 1500 rounds per week? Assuming you sleep 8h per night that averages 1 shot every 5 minutes or so.

Yes, currently I am, probably a little more... The bench is maybe 50ft from the back door. On Tuesday nights we have family 9mm night and probably go through a yellow box of the PMC 9mm 250 packs each. I have been shooting every morning and every evening. I just moved back home and am trying to spend every moment that I can with my brother and family shooting. I would bet my brother shoots that much through his rifle. He is either shooting or reloading..

JustinL
January 1, 2010, 06:34 AM
Wow, lucky guy.

Shooting is not a family sport on my end.

Happy new year.

Juice Boxes
January 1, 2010, 09:47 AM
I'll mostly do target practice in the desert, but could hunt varmints or deer.

I wouldn't trust a .223 with deer. I know that it could take one down with a good shot, but what about when there is that big buck there and you get buck fever and shake?

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