Need some caliber advice want a dual purpose deer/varmint rifle


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pat86323
January 10, 2010, 05:30 PM
I live in arizona, and i have always kind of relied on one rifle to do whatever i need it to. I started out with a savage 110 in 270. I didnt like this rifle very much as because of where the safety was located (i had a tendency to forget to turn it off in the moment of truth.) i have since ended up with a Remington 700 in 7mm magnum and i love the rifle. Everything seems to be right where i think it should and it just fits me very very well. I would like to get another rifle (likely another 700) in a smaller caliber. The problem is that 7mm is just too expensive and completely destroys whatever i hit that is smaller then a deer. Im thinking about maybe a 243 because it is cheaper to shoot, and can still be used on deer as a backup in case something were to happen with the scope or whatever on my 7mag. I realize that there are a million calibers out there but if anyone has a better idea on a round that fits my bill id love to hear it. Remember INEXPENSIVE TO SHOOT and sufficient for deer.

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Jubjub
January 10, 2010, 05:38 PM
You've hit the nail right on the head with the .243. My only suggestion is to get a long barrel. It's pretty much a magnum cartridge in terms of case capacity to bore size, and velocity suffers pretty badly with a carbine length gun.

pat86323
January 10, 2010, 05:39 PM
i like long barrels anyway for some reason.

Vern Humphrey
January 10, 2010, 05:42 PM
Go with the .243 and invest in a reloadoing kit.

JimKirk
January 10, 2010, 06:05 PM
243 Winchester or 25/06 Remington!

Jimmy K

MJR007
January 10, 2010, 06:11 PM
In your case 223 or 7.62x39. If you want to save money look into reloading (Lee). It is not hard at all and it will save you a lot of money. Good luck.

pat86323
January 10, 2010, 06:15 PM
i thought about that mjr, but im not sure that im real confident in the 223 stopping a big muley. I know it can be done and has been done many times i just feel like i dont want to get that small. I might even consider a 308 or an 06 but there i am getting to the tearing things up too bad territory again. dont get me wrong i dont care about ripping up a coyote. However a bobcat, fox or even a lion.....id like to not wipe one of those out.

Al LaVodka
January 10, 2010, 06:20 PM
.223 is insufficient on the average deer and a 7.62x39 is absurd for varmint.

The .243 would be my suggestion too -- its a necked-down .308. The .25-06 is probably not quite as good a choice but is an excellent cartridge, however, it is going to be more expensive and is a similarly necked-down .30-06.

Al

wyohome
January 10, 2010, 06:27 PM
.223 is insufficient on the average deer and a 7.62x39 is absurd for varmint.

I agree, 223 isn't even legal here for deer. I would go with a 243, much better all-around chambering. I use .308 FMJ for coyotes and haven't lost any. (yet)

MJR007
January 10, 2010, 06:29 PM
A 243 will put big hole into coyotes, bobcats and fox. I have done it. Never a lion. It is all about the bullet. Your 284 in a heavy barns triple x will put smaller holes in a fox than a soft point 243 and still take a deer off its' feet. If you want cheap ammo reload or cut your range and look into the 7.62. BTW I like the 243 a lot. Mine turned into a 7mm-08 with a Hart barrel.

lopezni
January 10, 2010, 08:42 PM
You can get 58gr varmint bullets for the .243, they have thin jackets and with the high velocity they fragment pretty well so you shouldn't have and issue. Get a .243, I love the .25-06, hard to find bullets under 100gr. Do not even consider a .223, the bullets available are specifically designed for varmint and the heavier bullets require a twist rate that is not found in bolt action rifles.

Eb1
January 10, 2010, 09:03 PM
25-06

X-Rap
January 10, 2010, 09:40 PM
A good varmint bullet/load does not equate to a good fur bullet/load. The spectacular fragmentation of the small thin jackets will ruin your hides, try around 100gr. bullets for coyotes.

skoro
January 10, 2010, 09:53 PM
I faced the same question you're dealing with back in September. It came to down to a choice between the 243 and 25-06. What decided it for me was the rifle I wanted (Winchester Featherweight Model 70) was ony available in 243.

I'm very pleased with both the caliber and rifle.

JimKirk
January 10, 2010, 11:10 PM
Plenty of 87 gr bullets for 25/06.
Speer makes a 87 gr TNT,
Sierra makes 75 gr HP, 87 gr SP, 90 gr HPBT,
Hornady makes 75 HP & 75 V-Max, 87 gr HP,
Nosler makes 87 BT
and some more I'm sure I missed.

Jimmy K

pat86323
January 11, 2010, 12:56 AM
I was already leaning heavily toward the 243 i just wanted a couple opinions. Im pretty sure im going to be lookin real hard for a used model 700 to fill this gap. If i came across one in 308 it would be hard to pass up though.

Big Bill
January 11, 2010, 02:09 AM
I love the 25-06 that I have. It's a Ruger M77 Mark II. The .243 would also be a great round.

Good luck in your quest. Let us know how it goes.

christcorp
January 11, 2010, 02:16 AM
Definitely the 243. It is probably one of the under estimated cartridges out there. Use to be where that was king of the longer shots. Then the 270, 280, 7mm mag, and so on really took off. Definitely the 243. I wish I still had mine. But here in wyoming, my 7mm pretty much handles everything imaginable. BTW; Wyohome; where is Deaver???

pat86323
January 11, 2010, 02:25 AM
my 7 isnt going anywhere for sure, i love that rifle. I just want something to shoot at littler critters with that wont cost 2.00$ every time i pull the trigger. Besides its always a good idea to have a backup come deer season right?

Marty183
January 11, 2010, 02:44 AM
.243...Has anyone suggested that one before? :)

Dr. Tad Hussein Winslow
January 11, 2010, 09:30 AM
Yep, what they said. .243 win or 6mm rem or .25-06 or .257 Bob. My choice is .243 Win.

rangerruck
January 11, 2010, 11:03 AM
dittos to all the above choices; if you can find an old remmy such as a 721, 600/660/mohawk , or a 788, in 6mm, I would get that first. yes 6mm is still a factory round, by remmy no less, and at Academy, it is about 14 bucks a box.
It is also a fantastic handloading round. Think 243 on super-steroids!!!
you should also see if 223 is legal in your state, or if not that, 22.250; that would knock over a coyote and any deer. But if you cannot get the above choices, next best 2 are the 243, and the 25.06.

X-Rap
January 11, 2010, 11:48 AM
6MM, think of 243 + 200 fps. hardly super-steroids. It is a good cartrige but may not be as easy as the 243 to find ammo without ordering. I have both and reload so I'm not bashing just relaying info as I see it.

Jeff82
January 11, 2010, 12:01 PM
.257 Roberts

pat86323
January 11, 2010, 01:44 PM
257 roberts is twice the price of 243, and from what i can see is actually more expensive then 7mm mag. Thanks for the input.

lopezni
January 11, 2010, 09:32 PM
Plenty of 87 gr bullets for 25/06.
Speer makes a 87 gr TNT,
Sierra makes 75 gr HP, 87 gr SP, 90 gr HPBT,
Hornady makes 75 HP & 75 V-Max, 87 gr HP,
Nosler makes 87 BT
and some more I'm sure I missed.

how can you assume he wants to invest in hand loading, it is obvious that hand loaders have more bullet choices than the average shooter. Do you know how many people have no interest in investing in reloading equipment or learning the skill, most.

billybob44
January 11, 2010, 10:28 PM
6MM, think of 243 + 200 fps. hardly super-steroids. It is a good cartrige but may not be as easy as the 243 to find ammo without ordering. I have both and reload so I'm not bashing just relaying info as I see it.
++1 For the 6MM. Yes harder to find-Yes (To Me) stronger performance, with hand loads. Especially in the 70-75gr. bullet weights. To me anyone who wants a do-it-all caliber and does NOT hand load, wants to go to Heaven-BUT-They DON'T want to DIE!!

bozar
January 11, 2010, 11:06 PM
I vote .25-06 if you don't reload, or .257 Roberts if you do.

Speedo66
January 11, 2010, 11:41 PM
6.5x55 Swede.

Accurate at long range, plenty of power for deer.

Not too expensive.

EP1990
January 11, 2010, 11:48 PM
.308. Good for those long shots you sometimes get out there, of course if your a capable shooter anyways. and a varmint is a varmint, who cares how much of it is left as long is it is dead? Unless your after pelts. Then .243 is good. but only within 300 yards for deer. 500 for varmints.

Uncle Mike
January 12, 2010, 12:11 AM
I vote .25-06 if you don't reload, or .257 Roberts if you do.

+1...do like the 257 though!

tommyintx
January 12, 2010, 01:58 AM
243. Especially if you load your own ammo. 62 grain varmint grenades by barnes are unbelievable, and you can use 85 grain tipped triple shocks for the deer, or regular tsx if you don't want polymer.. and if you love barnes bullets... they even have a banded solid for 6mm.. they only recommend it for target uses though.

NWCP
January 12, 2010, 04:05 AM
25-06

pat86323
January 12, 2010, 06:03 PM
I do not have any desire to handload currently, i am a college student with several roomates and have limited space. Im pretty sure ill be looking into a 243

robctwo
January 12, 2010, 09:24 PM
At the suggestion of an older hunter I bought a .243 Model 70 Winchester Featherweight in 1978 or 79. Shot a bunch of deer with it. Never did any varmint hunting, but lots of appropriate loads. Took it out to the range last weekend and put a few new 100 gr reloads through it. Great caliber, great gun.

sig220mw
January 12, 2010, 10:01 PM
If you reload, then the 257 roberts would indeed be a better choice. If not,
then the 243 or 6mm. However I must admit I don't know how expensive 6mm factory ammo is since it is not as popular as the 243.

TexasPatriot.308
January 12, 2010, 10:49 PM
the .22-250 is legal for deer in Texas, as is any centerfire, I use it for hogs also, if you are a good shot you can make it count, if not go with another caliber. low recoil, flat shooting, hunters even take mule deer and elk with it. Eskimos use it up north for their needs, or you can go with the hunting writers and experts that say it is a no-no to use this caliber on such game, I laugh every time I disprove those "experts" with a #300 hog on the ground. just think what our ancestors did with what they had to hunt with, they were good hunters, are you??

carbineguy
January 13, 2010, 10:31 AM
i just invested in a ruger .44 magnum carbine and granite u only get like 100-150 yards out of it its a great gun for no matter what im shooting

ReadyontheRight
January 13, 2010, 10:48 AM
Another vote for .243.

Available in many rifle platforms. Reloading components AND off-the-shelf ammo readily available. Gives you more distance and stability in wind than .223. Also a great round if you want to introduce someone of smaller stature to deer hunting.

Dallas Jack
January 13, 2010, 11:44 PM
.243 Winchester or .257 Roberts. Both kill better than they should.
Dallas Jack

digisol
February 27, 2010, 10:30 PM
I only offer my 2c for the 25:06 mentioned, the ability of a any calibre to shoot accurately is of no issue, all will shoot well with good ammo, the 25:06 however will shoot a wider variety of bullet sizes just heavier and much faster than any 243 will.

I have a soft spot for the 25 cal rocket, will shoot flat and reach out to long range with sufficient force to to take deer easyt at 300 yds, and sure the 243 will do the much the same but the 25:06 has greater knock down at longer range, the choice should be easy.

The 25:06 might be considered as a 22:250 varmint round on steroids, the ability to use 120g pils make the long ranges more practical, the only rifle I use over and above the 25 rocket is the 7mm RM, which will take nearly anything to ranges that make a 24X scope versitile.

Yes a 25:06 over the 243 is no contest, although at closer range the 243 is a very good utility calibre that is noisy but very easy on the shoulder, a bit like the 308 is in it's calibre range, and a must have in your collection, simple, more guns = better.

FMJMIKE
February 28, 2010, 08:24 AM
I got a Savage in .243 Win. for the same reasons.

ruger700
February 28, 2010, 02:42 PM
I used 70 grain nosler ballistic tips in my M70 Sporter (24") last year on PDs out to 300 yards. I enjoyed excellent accuracy and it was devastating on the dogs. I have used the Sierra 100 Gameking on Texas whitetails with tremendous success.

bpl
February 28, 2010, 09:45 PM
The man wants a dual cartridge with cheaper ammo and he does not reload... .243 is the answer. There is really nothing to debate.

Geno
February 28, 2010, 10:42 PM
bpl said:

The man wants a dual cartridge with cheaper ammo and he does not reload... .243 is the answer. There is really nothing to debate.

You kidder you! There's always something to debate. I would suggest the .260 Rem with 100 to 120 grain loads, or the 7-08 Rem with 120 to 140 grain loads as they are more potent round for varmint and deer. Both the .260 and the 7-08 possess better down-range ballistics than the .243 Win, equally mild recoil, and a nice selection of factory loadings. Why just settle with a .243 when one can thrive with the .260 or 7-08?

Just debating... :D

Geno

Oic0
February 28, 2010, 10:50 PM
Odd I never knew a .223 wouldn't kill a deer. Just the other day people were arguing that it does way more internal damage than a .357 carbine... yet people hunt deer with .357 carbines AND pistols with no complaints. They just aren't as forgiving of mediocre shooting like the newer ultra mags etc...

Deer aren't armor plated, that is just what the gun rags say. The state law in my state says larger rim fires and any center fire.

MJ
February 28, 2010, 10:50 PM
I kind of like the 75mm L40KW for mid range varmit and game. 3200 fps at 700 meters is still moving along.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v130/montereyjack/b302e5b6.jpg

Cheers
...MJ...

PowerG
February 28, 2010, 10:54 PM
7mm-08.

blackops
February 28, 2010, 11:19 PM
243 win

JimKirk
March 1, 2010, 12:22 AM
Lopezni
how can you assume he wants to invest in hand loading, it is obvious that hand loaders have more bullet choices than the average shooter. Do you know how many people have no interest in investing in reloading equipment or learning the skill, most.

No where before my post did he say anything about not being a reloader.

No I don't have any idea how many people chose not to reload, do you?

How can you assume that he may not be interested in reloading, he only says so after your post.


Jimmy K

AzBuckfever
March 1, 2010, 01:24 AM
pat, where in AZ? I'm from AZ as well. Anyway, one thing to think about is what you plan on doing with the pelts of the varmints/predators. I'm also in the same boat as I was looking for a good rifle for predators/back up for deer. One thing I considered is that regardless of .243 or .25-06; you're gonna make a hole. Especially in a lighter game such as bobcats/small coyotes, etc. You could reduce this by shooting a bullet with a higher Ballistic co-efficient/less fragmentation, and heavier to limit it's time for expansion; but as said, still gonna get a hole. I'm going to opt for a 25-06 for 2 reasons. #1; I have an 30-06 right now that I'm going to have rechambered when I get a 300 WSM...#2, 25-06 has damn near, if not better ballistics/trajectory than a 30-06 shooting the same grain.

.243 is a great caliber, but I tend to still think of it as more of a youth gun for hunting deer and such. The benefit of a .243 though is you're much more likely to find ammo for it at any mom&pop store or Wal-Mart in the preference that you desire rather than a 25-06.

I wouldn't trust a .223 on one of our AZ Muleys without a well placed shot :)

AzBuckfever
March 1, 2010, 01:26 AM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v726/BuckFever/243holejpg.jpg

Taken off sniper-hide.....This is with a .243 so yeah, you're gonna get a hole :) This is a little extreme though, and probably shot with a Ballistic Tip or some rapid expansion round.

bpl
March 1, 2010, 11:25 PM
You kidder you! There's always something to debate. I would suggest the .260 Rem with 100 to 120 grain loads, or the 7-08 Rem with 120 to 140 grain loads as they are more potent round for varmint and deer. Both the .260 and the 7-08 possess better down-range ballistics than the .243 Win, equally mild recoil, and a nice selection of factory loadings. Why just settle with a .243 when one can thrive with the .260 or 7-08?

Just debating...


Geno,

I agree with most everything you said. However, the .260 and 7mm-08 do not fulfill the cheaper ammo criteria, nor do the .257 Roberts or 25-06 for that matter. All of these other cartridges have more recoil than the .243 as well, although I agree its not much more. I love the 7mm-08, bye the way. Its a great deer cartridge for sure and is my preference for deer over the .243. It wouldn't really be my preference for a varmint cartridge though.

FWIW, IME the cheapest deer hunting ammo is usually 30-30, followed closely by .243/.308/.270/30-06, which are usually all about the same price. All the others mentioned are less common and more expensive.

Kentucky_Rifleman
March 2, 2010, 02:06 AM
Take my advice with a grain of salt; I'm a fan of classic calibers. That said, no one here has mentioned 7x57 Mauser.

I have an old Greek model 95 that's been sporterized, and it's a jewel. It's pleasant to shoot, and ammo isn't to bad to find, if you frequent gun shows.

It's even better to reload, especially since you can reload both the 7x57 and 7 mag with the same bullets.

If you want a do-it-all rifle the 7x57 is still hard to beat - even after a 115 years!

KR

joed
March 2, 2010, 11:57 AM
I faced the same question you're dealing with back in September. It came to down to a choice between the 243 and 25-06. What decided it for me was the rifle I wanted (Winchester Featherweight Model 70) was ony available in 243.

Then I would have spit on the Winchester and gone elsewhere!

I've used a .25-06 for more then 30 years. There is nothing like the .25-06, it is truely a multi purpose cartridge. You can load 75 to 87 gr bullets for varmints and 100 to 120 for larger game. The trajectory is very flat and it is ballistically superior to the 6mm cartridges.

The .25 has an even bigger following out west where the ranges are longer.

Retooferab
March 2, 2010, 12:20 PM
I vote 25-06 for most of the reasons already listed. I mostly hunt coyotes and deer. I handload and with my loads I have a point blank sight in to 340 yards, which means the bullet never travels more than 3 inches up or down in the 340 yards. Just put your target in the crosshairs and pull the trigger out to long ranges

mgmorden
March 2, 2010, 12:38 PM
.257 Roberts. Yeah, the ammo costs more, but this likely won't be extremely high volume shooting. .243 will certainly work fine if cost really is a concern, but it's just a smidge weaker than I'd like for deer, while .257 is just perfect.

gspdave45
March 2, 2010, 01:24 PM
Don't like the .243, I consider it a bit too small to be considered a solid big game round and much too large for the purpose of varminting. I'm pretty much in the camp of using the right tool for the right job, this makes my opinion admittedly biased against it.
That said, for the purposes indicated by the OP, there isn't really anything better than the .243, considering off the shelf availability and affordability of ammo. I could make an argument for the .250 Savage, or maybe the 6mm Remington, but the .243 is the choice when all factors are considered.

wankerjake
March 2, 2010, 01:32 PM
Remember INEXPENSIVE TO SHOOT and sufficient for deer.
Sums up the .243 win perfectly in my opinion. Remington 100gr core-lokts is a great bullet for both deer and coyotes, and it's relatively inexpensive. I've killed several mule deer with mine around Flagstaff, man i miss it up there!

jimmyraythomason
March 2, 2010, 02:18 PM
.223 is insufficient on the average deer and a 7.62x39 is absurd for varmint.
now that is spoken like a true magnumite. The .223 is not optimal but not at all inadequate and a 7.62x39 is excellent on deer and varmints. Having said that I like my .257 Roberts but it is expensive to shoot.

mgmorden
March 2, 2010, 11:24 PM
now that is spoken like a true magnumite. The .223 is not optimal but not at all inadequate

No - magnumite's believe that your traditional .30-06's and such are inadequate for deer. They go to the overkill level. .223 is a whole different story - to the point that it's ILLEGAL to use on deer in most states. It happens to be legal in mine, but I certainly wouldn't take my .223 out deer hunting. Those who would are the opposite of those with magnumitis. They try to skate down as low as possible on the power tree and will make many animals suffer a longer and needlessly painful death before they find something that is just barely enough to dispatch one.

If you want something where there's no question but is still light on recoil, look at the mid-level cartridges. .257 Roberts, .250 Savage, .25-06, 6.5x55, 7mm-08, etc.

Leaky Waders
March 2, 2010, 11:52 PM
If you have a 7 mm mag, then the best thing to do would be to buy a basic reloading kit and learn the versatility of that particular round.

Since you don't want to reload, then the cheapest 'varmint' round would be a .22. I mean, you already have a 7mm mag that can kill everything in North America depending on bullet selection.

A do it all for cheap without reloading rifle would be a military caliber so you can purchase surplus ammo. A versatile gun for hunting deer and varmints - albeit close range - would be a shotgun.

I think it boils down to how much you really plan to shoot. You're in college - are you really going to shoot more than 5 boxes of shells per year?

Any deer rifle will kill a varmint, just match the bullet to the game.

jimmyraythomason
March 3, 2010, 07:37 AM
will make many animals suffer a longer and needlessly painful death before they find something that is just barely enough to dispatch one. A poor shot can do that with ANY caliber.

Al LaVodka
March 3, 2010, 08:02 AM
now that is spoken like a true magnumite. The .223 is not optimal but not at all inadequate and a 7.62x39 is excellent on deer and varmints.
The "magnum" BS was already responded too for me (I was among the first to recommend the .243 BTW), and 7.62x39 is not a varmint cartridge by any stretch of anyone's imagination except maybe some cheap ComBlock-under-any-and-all-circumstances defender, and they're SO wrong (usually).
Al

jimmyraythomason
March 3, 2010, 08:05 AM
7.62x39 is not a varmint cartridge by any stretch of anyone's imagination except maybe some cheap ComBlock-under-any-and-all-circumstances defender, and they're SO wrong (usually).
You really don't have one and have never shot one,have you?

Al LaVodka
March 3, 2010, 08:10 AM
You really don't have one and have never shot one,have you?
Apparently you have nothing but. I, on the other hand, have many as well as many other calibers that I actually shoot, Jimmy my boy, including a longer heavy-barrel bipoded target 7.62x39. Unless one is reloading quality brass and feeding a fairly specialized rifle there isn't even a point putting a scope on a 7.62x39 IMO. And at that point, just get a quality .30-30, which I ALSO wouldn't recommend for a Varmint rifle.

We know the "Jimmy-Rays" of the forum(s): now you are supposed to come back and tell us that the Mosin Nagant is actually the best deer and everything-else rifle and that the Tokarev, no, a MAKAROV, which you'll insist is a design not stolen by the Russians also, has to be carried for a coup de grace...

:rolleyes:

Al

jimmyraythomason
March 3, 2010, 08:18 AM
Now you are supposed to come back and tell us that the Mosin is the best deer rifle, and the Tokarev and Makarov should be carried for a coup-de-grace...
Actually I've never owned a Mosin(I don't like them) I do like the Makarov but I never used one for a coup-de-grace. I have had to use a second shot though with my 7mm-08.

Kernel
March 3, 2010, 09:31 AM
For way less than the cost of a new rifle, scope, base, & rings you could buy a basic reloading kit. Learn to DOWNLOAD your 7 Rem Mag. Make it shoot like a 7mm Whisper, 7 TCU, 7-08, 7x57, .280, .284, 7 WSM, ..., ...., .... All with the one rifle and scope you already own. The one downside is you wouldn't have the luxury of a backup rifle.

PowerG
March 3, 2010, 10:02 PM
I don't really see any advantage the .243 would have over the 7-08, except for possibly ammo availability. OP obviously has internet access, so that shouldn't be a problem. It would do excellent service on varmints, and would be a fair bit more capable on deer. I believe that with Hornady Light Magnum ammo (and their excellent Interlock bullets) the ballistics pretty much duplicates most factory .280 loads, so we're up there in some pretty good company as far as long-range capabilities for varmints, still with pretty mild recoil. Great caliber.

Uncle Mike
March 4, 2010, 02:06 AM
Get yourself a good 30-06 and be done with it.....or not. The 25-06 would be a good one, ammo isn't all that bad, money wise.

Between the 243 and 7mm-08...the 7mm!:D

mshootnit
March 4, 2010, 09:44 AM
I always have to drop one of these bombs in awhile:
The perfect caliber for everything from common ordinary field mice all the way up to moose is the 30-06! You knew that didn't you?;)

PowerG
March 4, 2010, 10:37 AM
Sums it up pretty well, hard to beat the old reliable 06.

Art Eatman
March 4, 2010, 10:45 AM
My do-all critter, me bein' a handloader, has been the '06. Round lead ball for squirrel; 80-grain or 110-grain for varmints, 150-grain for deer and 180s for elk or meese.

My backup has been a .243 carbine. I've mostly used the Sierra 85-grain HPBT, accounting for some 25+ tagged bucks and a fair number of coyotes. The 55-grain bullet does nasty things to prairie dogs.

Lotsa other good cartridges out there, of course, but these two certainly have worked for me for some forty years.

Uncle Mike
March 4, 2010, 10:51 AM
Round lead ball for squirrel;

How's that working...? I tried that years ago with astronomically disappointing results!

Tried it again some years back using a sabot, worked better but still not skwack accurate.

PowerG
March 4, 2010, 11:26 PM
Fully expecting stuff to get thrown at me, I'll throw one of my favorite heresies out there-in range, terminal effects, every useful measure of a cartridge, the difference between the 7-08, .308, .270, .280, and 06 (150gr) is negligible in the real world. They are all practically interchangable on 90%+ of the shots taken on game.

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