Why does everyone think their guns are worth a fortune?


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hometheaterman
January 18, 2010, 01:02 PM
I check local gun classifieds often looking for something that will catch my eye at a decent price and it seems like guys always think their guns are worth a fortune. Now I don't expect to find an amazing deal from every post but it seems like I hardly even see decent reasonable prices much less a deal. I've seen maybe one or two deals posted on the site. Seems like guys think their used 870 Expresses are worth $270-300. Now I can't remember exactly what they cost at Walmart but last I remember seeing one it was under $300. Their Savage non accu trigger Model 10's and 11's you see every once in a while for $300 but often for $350-370. You can buy a model 10 at Walmart with the accu trigger for $400. The ones with the accu triggers people seem to think are worth $500-550. Once again you can get these for $400 with the cheap Simmons scope at Walmart. When it comes to Glocks people seem to want $500 or so for one stock. They are like $525 at local gun shops for a new one. Others seem to have added night sites and a holster and think they are now worth $700. Seems like the 10/22's often the sellers want over $200 for the basic one or at least around $200. You can get them for $197 last time I checked brand new at Walmart.

Anyone else notice this? So why do these people think their guns are worth a fortune? Seems like almost every gun I see for sale the price is almost what a new one would be and the used ones are often an old model lacking features of a new one or like the new ones but beat or scratched up. Every once in while I see one like new but once again it's usually still around the same price. Now I've seen a deal or two but it just seems like the majority of prices are crazy high. I've got friends that hunt and have bought and sold guns and they don't want to pay near these prices for them nor do I. In fact several of them have sold their guns and not gotten near these prices for them either. However, usually they end up just selling to someone they know instead of posting it online.

So is there a reason for prices to be this high? Do these guys actually sell these things?

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Ed Ames
January 18, 2010, 01:14 PM
It's not just guns. Go price used computers. There is nothing funnier than someone trying to sell an old PC for more than a current model would cost, justifying the absurdity with an, "I paid NNNN." Yeah, and today you can get a better model for NNN brand new.

preachnhunt
January 18, 2010, 01:20 PM
I have found that ANYTHING I want to sell is a piece of junk I should just give away and ANYTHING i want to buy is solid gold.

SteveCase
January 18, 2010, 01:22 PM
Ehh I really only have one gun that is worth a lil bit of money, its a fulton sxs shotgun from the 20's, it was grandpas and ill never sell it. Well lets see i have a steven sxs also probably could get 150 for it, along with two well used mossberg that would probably fetch 100 bucks apeice, an sks that i could sell for like 150. a Stevens buck horn that would go for about 75. a Howa 1500 in .30-06 might get 250 for it, and beatup ithca 37 20ga again about 100-120. thats about it. But then again I have uses for these guns and they are not kept as safe queens so im not worried about that stuff. maybe if all guns got confiscated and I was able to hide these then maybe I could get alot of money for them.

HunterBear71
January 18, 2010, 01:56 PM
I've noticed the same prices. I hope folks are expecting to be offered significantly less than their asking price.

D Boone
January 18, 2010, 02:16 PM
There was a local gunshow this weekend, and the prices on Ar's seemed to be nearing reality, but the prices of ak's were still crazy. Same way with local shop. All I can figure is they have too much in them, and instead of reducing the price of their used ak they are just willing to sit on it. Bad for business really, as it keeps me from either buying one of his off the shelf, or transferring one through him out of fear of insult. Getting back to the gunshow, if you walk around these things, and you have an apple in your mind you want to compare at different vendors, it amazes me the differences in prices, looking for a pistol, the same exact model was going for anywhere from 329-450 depending on the vendor.

Claude Clay
January 18, 2010, 02:20 PM
mine is old & used and is worth less:(

theirs is special and worth more cause its....well, its theirs:scrutiny:

if you honestly want to sell a gun check completed sales on GBer and see what people are paying.
that is more relevant then what you want for it.

when making a purchase i try to look foward to its retained value.
if spending a bit $ more today ges me more in 5 or so years, do it.
plus you have the benifit of shooting it all that time and getting your money back.
S&W vs charter arms or taurus. check it out and the smart money is on the smith.

mljdeckard
January 18, 2010, 02:24 PM
What's the line I read in someone's sig line, something to the effect of;

Overheard at gun show: "Are you wanting to buy that priceless family heirloom or are you trying to get rid of that rusty piece of junk?"

I won't sweat people for being optimistic in their selling prices, I'm a capitalist. But any commodity on this planet is worth exactly what someone is willing to pay for it. It's one thing to start high in your asking price. It's another to actually get upset when people bargain you down.

Manco
January 18, 2010, 02:25 PM
They're hoping to find a sucker who will overpay without realizing it--this happens constantly on all types of items on eBay, so why not guns?

FenderTK421
January 18, 2010, 02:28 PM
There are occasionally sane people who advertise their used gun for 10-50% of new price; what gets me is the near constant ads offering $170 Hi-points brand new, unfired for $350-400, or brand new $200 Mossberg Mavericks for $300-400. Makes me wonder if these people are just fencing for felons?

jmr40
January 18, 2010, 02:30 PM
There are a lot of people who will pay a premium for a used gun from an individual so there will be no paper trail.

481
January 18, 2010, 02:33 PM
Legitimate collector's items aside, in a word: Greed.


In a market where folks are selling their guns in order to pay for groceries and the other necessities of life (there is a whole lotta financial hurt'n out there), any seller is hardly in a position to demand unrealistic prices with used firearms flooding into the market as they seem to be. Anyone asking more for a used firearm than what this market will actually bear is in for a very long wait and the market will eventually educate them in that regard.

With what folks are asking for their used (and sometimes abused) guns, I find it preferable to simply spend a little extra (or less in some cases) and just get a new one that hasn't been the subject of someone's WECSOG project.

jh9x18ky
January 18, 2010, 02:43 PM
Something else to think about....... If I sell you my gun at a bargain price, you get a real deal on it... what happens when I try to buy one back ? You have to be careful how you price an item, once it leaves, its hard to replace.

NinjaFeint
January 18, 2010, 02:43 PM
I will only buy used guns that I can handle and inspect before even discussing price. I don't even bother looking at the price they are asking for used guns because I am going to haggle. I could give two craps what they think it is worth because I will not budge from what I am willing to pay.

I also won't buy used unless their is a significant discount over new or that gun is no longer available new.

fastbolt
January 18, 2010, 02:57 PM
People who spend hard earned money on things like to think whatever they're buying doesn't depreciate. ;)

You should see the raised eyebrows when the annual Glock Days sale comes around and cops are told what their used Glocks are worth in trade on a new one. :what:

Of course, they don't mind paying a low price for a new one ... :rolleyes:

98C5
January 18, 2010, 03:00 PM
I could see someone trying to sell a WASR-10 AK for $600 now when they purchased it during the Obama frenzy. Of course they can be had for $400 or less.

mec
January 18, 2010, 03:01 PM
"I paid NNNN."

Thats It! It's because we pay so much for the things to begin with.

THE MACHINIST
January 18, 2010, 03:02 PM
Why not just buy at wal-mart ?

twice barrel
January 18, 2010, 03:03 PM
What if you acquire a gun, add improvements like aftermarket sights, have the action cleaned up, have the trigger improved all by a reputable gunsmith and essentially double your cost in the gun. These improvements are real but not necessarily visible nor appreciated by a potential buyer.

Should the seller just give these enhancements away?

I don't think so,

TB

481
January 18, 2010, 03:15 PM
What if you acquire a gun, add improvements like aftermarket sights, have the action cleaned up, have the trigger improved all by a reputable gunsmith and essentially double your cost in the gun. These improvements are real but not necessarily visible nor appreciated by a potential buyer.

Should the seller just give these enhancements away?

I don't think so,

TB

Nobody is saying anything of the sort from what I've read above.

The market bears what it will. If an owner invests in their gun by making alterations/modifications/enhancements that no one else desires or values, then they will likely see no return on their "investment".

If the cost of the "enhancements" is not recoverable in the current market you are also free to refrain from trying to sell it.

oasis618
January 18, 2010, 03:23 PM
Exactly. It's almost not even worth going to gun shows anymore because I can drive 10 minutes down the road to LGS and buy new for the same price or less.

PTK
January 18, 2010, 03:27 PM
Maybe I'm weird, but I generally took the blue book value and took off 20% as a starting price on my "for sale" guns. :)

DoubleTapDrew
January 18, 2010, 03:27 PM
If an owner invests in their gun by making alterations/modifications/enhancements that no one else desires or values, then they will likely see no return on their "investment".
That's why. People see guns as investments, so when they sell it they expect a return. That may be true for some collectors pieces but not for someone's pitted 10/22. I figure the loss I take on a gun as the rental fee for X years worth of shooting enjoyment I had with it.

pbearperry
January 18, 2010, 03:31 PM
Don't forget the part about the guns being very rare all the time.lol

elrod
January 18, 2010, 03:31 PM
Why not just buy at wal-mart ?


Fine, as long as you want a shotgun or a non-AR type rifle. Everything else, you're SOL.:(

481
January 18, 2010, 03:35 PM
That's why. People see guns as investments, so when they sell it they expect a return. That may be true for some collectors pieces but not for someone's pitted 10/22. I figure the loss I take on a gun as the rental fee for X years worth of shooting enjoyment I had with it.

How true.

Just as no one has been compelled to make "enhancements" to their guns, no one can be compelled to buy such a gun when it is offered for sale. I always get a chuckle out of those who believe they can dictate market behavior.

Yours is a healthy attitude to have when it comes to recognizing the effects that realistic depreciation will have upon any commodity.

Ala Dan
January 18, 2010, 03:42 PM
"Pursuit Of Happiness"~! :D

mec
January 18, 2010, 03:42 PM
a lot of this comes up when the little woman, who has been told all these years that the guns are an investment, turns into the little widow. A lot of dealers hate it when they walk in because there is no convincing them that the dealer is not a crook.

jad0110
January 18, 2010, 04:01 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by twice barrel:
What if you acquire a gun, add improvements like aftermarket sights, have the action cleaned up, have the trigger improved all by a reputable gunsmith and essentially double your cost in the gun. These improvements are real but not necessarily visible nor appreciated by a potential buyer.

Should the seller just give these enhancements away?

I don't think so,

TB

Nobody is saying anything of the sort from what I've read above.

The market bears what it will. If an owner invests in their gun by making alterations/modifications/enhancements that no one else desires or values, then they will likely see no return on their "investment".

If the cost of the "enhancements" is not recoverable in the current market you are also free to refrain from trying to sell it.

Exactly. Works the same way with cars. If you take a car that has a private party value of $5,000 (say, a 6 or 7 year old Ford Focus) and spend $3,000 on a paint job, does this mean you can suddenly turn around and sell it for $8,000?

Heck, most improvements to a home in good condition don't usually result in a 100+% return on investment.

A friend of mine has a 30 foot, 1980 (IIRC) Carver Cabin Cruiser. Twin 350s, bought it used in 2004 or so for $15k in good condition. Well, by 2006 he discovered what B-O-A-T stood for: Bust Out Another Thousand :D, and the boat went up for sale. Not for the market value at the time (2006), mind you (about $13k, 2k less than he paid for it), but for about $19k. Why? The wife "reasoned" that since they had to dump $4k in repairs into it the boat, that it was now worth the original purchase price (15k) plus the repairs (4k). If it really worked this way, boats would usually make fantastic investments, with huge rates of return :rolleyes: . Needless to say, the boat still hasn't sold - it is just eating more in taxes and insurance, as well as storage fees in drydock.

"I paid NNNN."

Yup, that's clearly a big part of it (see boat example above). The computer example was a good one too. I see so many 5 year old computers in the local paper for $150 freakin' dollars :scrutiny: - a brand new one can be found for $100 more!!!

Anyone asking more for a used firearm than what this market will actually bear is in for a very long wait and the market will eventually educate them in that regard.

I hope you are right in regards to used, pre-lock, pre-MIM S&W revolver prices. For those that are into these guns, they are very aware of the rapid price escallation of pre-MIM, pre-lock S&W wheel guns in the last 2 years. But within just the last 2 months, I have seen an alarming increase in the asking price for these guns, often exceeding the price of NIB examples. Plain jane 4" S&W Model 10s for $500 or more (saw a 4" 10-7 in 80% condition for $599 recently), 2.5" Model 19s and 66s for $650 and up, and 3" Model 13s for $550 or more. :(

One of the more interesting ones I've observed are used Taurus Model 66 revolvers with asking prices as high as S&W Model 66s; I guess people figure that since they look alike, they are worth the same. I've seen more than one used Taurus 66 with an asking price of around $500 - which is often FAR higher then the price of a new one. :banghead:

Whether any of these guns are selling for these prices, I'm not certain. I've seen lots more auctions on Gunbroker ending with no bids lately for guns priced sky high, so it appears the market isn't supporting these prices.

TonyDedo
January 18, 2010, 04:06 PM
I know a lot of people will price a gun higher than they expect to sell it for because they know they’re going to be lowballed, and if the buyer and seller can meet somewhere in the middle the buyer feels like he talked the seller down and the seller got about what he wanted in the first place.

That being said, from time to time I call out a seller on their asking price, and instead of being willing to negotiate I’m shocked at how they try to justify their price.

Just last week I saw a used 10/22 being advertised for $225 in the local forum’s classifieds. The seller mentioned in his ad that he reached that selling price based on the price of a new 10/22, so I PM him and mentioned that the same rifle sells for $199 at the local gun shop.

He emailed me back and said that the gun was older, and thus better and worth more (he cited the metal trigger guard, vs. plastic on the current production 10/22) and that he was including $35 worth of accessories with the gun (ad says the gun comes with 2 mags, scope base and a brick of bulk ammo – I don’t know if he thinks bulk .22 is worth $35 a brick, or if he doesn’t realize the mags and scope base are included with a new rifle too). Plus I'd be "saving sales tax."

In my mind, the reassurance of buying from a dealer > savings 6% sales tax any day.

Regardless, he changes his price in the ad to $200, but says he gave away the scope base and refuses to ship the gun. So now his possible market went from 50 states down to one.

After several users post “PM sent” he bumps the ad with a reply that says “I’m not dropped the price, so stop asking. I’d like this gone this weekend please, I need the money.”

It’s Monday morning, and the rifle is still there. Big surprise.

MachIVshooter
January 18, 2010, 04:17 PM
Maybe I'm weird, but I generally took the blue book value and took off 20% as a starting price on my "for sale" guns.

Depends. Sometimes the market value is substantilly less than BB (more than 20%). Other times, much higher. I look at local stores first. If no examples can be found, I check the average on GA and GB and reduce by 20-30%. This approach has served me well in the few actual sales I've made. Most of the time, though, I trade guns for other guns with ammo, accessories and cash to negate the difference in values.

bad_aim_billy
January 18, 2010, 04:23 PM
If I'm buying a used gun, I could care less about any "improvements" that have been made. Who says I, the buyer, even want them on there? I might have to pay money to take them OFF.

The vast majority of people can't seem to understand that their belongings aren't worth much. Watch Antiques Roadshow-- for every vintage desk or rare painting, there are 100 pieces of underwhelming junk...

Bailey Boat
January 18, 2010, 04:44 PM
I always love the "rare" or "custom" or "one of a kind", heck let's throw "tactical" in there as well. The seller thinks if it has anything that may/possibly/could be out of the ordinary, or if he's never seen one before it must be "special".

A Mossberg last week on one of the boards was being sold as tactical because it had a "black" stock set. Give me a break!!!!!! Or the Rem 870 Express that "must" have been parkerized at some point when the word "Express" was stamped into the side of the receiver!!!!

How about the seller that acts like you just called his mother a hooker when you DARE to offer less than the inflated price he's demanding!!!! I refused a Smith 27 a few weeks ago because it was so damned dirty I couldn't even get a good look at the bore, cylinder or top strap. I handed it back and said I was looking for something that was in better condition and he just shook his head and walked away mumbling. In MY mind if you're going to try and sell a gun, CLEAN it first!!!!!!

Dr.Mall Ninja
January 18, 2010, 04:52 PM
Why not just buy at wal-mart ? I would rather give my money to a gun store, besides id be hard pressed to find a gun at wal mart that I would want.

EddieNFL
January 18, 2010, 04:55 PM
On the other side of the coin, I've had people approach me and make ridiculous offers for guns I wasn't interested in selling. Most recently, a fellow offered 1,500 for a 3K plus firearm. He was offended I ignored him.

mljdeckard
January 18, 2010, 04:56 PM
and jmr, anonmity is desireable, but I've never seen it to be necessary to pay more for it. Even fenced illegal guns to criminals don't cost significantly more than the regular market, if at all. If the guns were stolen, it's all profit margin anyway.

Vern Humphrey
January 18, 2010, 05:05 PM
"A thing is worth what a willing buyer will offer and a willing seller will accept."

If you offer to sell me a gun (or anything else) at an astronomical price, and I buy it at that price, you and I have agreed it is worth that price. Similarly, if I offer to buy a gun (or anything else) from you at a very low price, and you sell it, we have agreed.

If you think prices are too high, don't buy. If everyone else adopts the same strategy, prices will come down.

W.E.G.
January 18, 2010, 05:16 PM
"local guns classifieds?"

Is that like in a PAPER NEWSPAPER?

Where the seller has to PAY for an ad?... that gets deleted after just a few days?

What year is this?

mec
January 18, 2010, 05:24 PM
I hope you are right in regards to used, pre-lock, pre-MIM S&W revolver prices

A few years ago, these could be had for something like bargains. Most people want to buy semi-autos. Vintage revolver enthusiasts are not exactly undergoing a population explosion but as S&W continues to add "improvements" to their revolver line, the tribe grows more and more fond of the "pre" ones.
It could be that as the generation that remembers the older revolvers as desirable classics undergoes attrition, the prices will drop again.
http://www.thehighroad.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=113591&stc=1&d=1263853305
This one was a bargain at six hundred. A couple of years ago, i could have gotten it for three or four. Likely, it will be in virtually the same near-new condition when they find me decomposing into the recliner cushions.

jad0110
January 18, 2010, 06:36 PM
"local guns classifieds?"

Is that like in a PAPER NEWSPAPER?

Where the seller has to PAY for an ad?... that gets deleted after just a few days?

What year is this?

Believe it or not, once in a blue moon deals can be found. By only a few hours, a friend of mine missed out on a 2.5" S&W Model 19 for $250.

FYI, they are worth at least twice that, assuming good condition.

mec,

$600 for that 27 is quite good these days. Gorgeous gun BTW. Guess one day I'll pony up for one, either the fairly rare Model 24 in 44 Special.

hometheaterman
January 18, 2010, 07:09 PM
"local guns classifieds?"

Is that like in a PAPER NEWSPAPER?

Where the seller has to PAY for an ad?... that gets deleted after just a few days?

What year is this? No there is an online forum for gun ads that is only for this state. So adds are free to post.


As far as buying from Walmart if there was a gun I wanted that Walmart also had and it was the same price, cheaper, or within $50 I'd more than likely buy it there instead of a used one. Same goes for if a gun shop had a gun Walmart didn't have for the same price as a used one or not much more. I'd buy that one instead of a used one. However, if I was saving $150 or so I'd consider the used one. Or if it's something I wanted that they no longer made I'd also consider a used one.

Tamlin
January 18, 2010, 07:59 PM
In a gun store last week, I saw two virtually identical S&W 629s, both with 4" bbls. One was new, one was used on consignment. New price: $849. Used: $795. Seems pretty outrageous for the used one, BUT, the store charged a $75 FFL transfer fee for all used guns. Which made the used one MORE than the new one! Hmmm, wonder why it hasn't sold . . . .

Dravur
January 18, 2010, 08:24 PM
What if you acquire a gun, add improvements like aftermarket sights, have the action cleaned up, have the trigger improved all by a reputable gunsmith and essentially double your cost in the gun. These improvements are real but not necessarily visible nor appreciated by a potential buyer.

Should the seller just give these enhancements away?

I don't think so,

TB

What about that hi-point that someone had engraved? I guess the buyer should pay for that?

DammitBoy
January 18, 2010, 08:36 PM
Well lets see i have a steven sxs, probably could get 150 for it...


Sold! I haven't seen a Stevens sxs for less than $400 anywhere in two years.

22-rimfire
January 18, 2010, 09:11 PM
Mine are worth a fortune to me. Just depends on what you call a fortune.

481
January 18, 2010, 09:24 PM
What about that hi-point that someone had engraved? I guess the buyer should pay for that?

That's kinda like puttin' a party dress on a pig, ain't it? :evil:

NMGonzo
January 18, 2010, 09:43 PM
I pay whatever I am able.

I am only able to pay as much as I can get for the guns I have now.

What is that called?

Moral Capital.

Is a can of soda worth a dollar?

If someone pays for it; bet your pants it is.

MrWesson
January 18, 2010, 10:48 PM
TonyDedo
Member


Join Date: September 19, 2007
Location: Boston, MA
Posts: 100

I know a lot of people will price a gun higher than they expect to sell it for because they know they’re going to be lowballed, and if the buyer and seller can meet somewhere in the middle the buyer feels like he talked the seller down and the seller got about what he wanted in the first place.

That being said, from time to time I call out a seller on their asking price, and instead of being willing to negotiate I’m shocked at how they try to justify their price.

Just last week I saw a used 10/22 being advertised for $225 in the local forum’s classifieds. The seller mentioned in his ad that he reached that selling price based on the price of a new 10/22, so I PM him and mentioned that the same rifle sells for $199 at the local gun shop.

He emailed me back and said that the gun was older, and thus better and worth more (he cited the metal trigger guard, vs. plastic on the current production 10/22) and that he was including $35 worth of accessories with the gun (ad says the gun comes with 2 mags, scope base and a brick of bulk ammo – I don’t know if he thinks bulk .22 is worth $35 a brick, or if he doesn’t realize the mags and scope base are included with a new rifle too). Plus I'd be "saving sales tax."

In my mind, the reassurance of buying from a dealer > savings 6% sales tax any day.

Regardless, he changes his price in the ad to $200, but says he gave away the scope base and refuses to ship the gun. So now his possible market went from 50 states down to one.

After several users post “PM sent” he bumps the ad with a reply that says “I’m not dropped the price, so stop asking. I’d like this gone this weekend please, I need the money.”


I will say in the 10/22 guy's defense that he is right and older metal guarded 10/22's are selling for more than a brand new one. Put simply they were made to higher standards.

I saw a guy's ad today with a glock 26 for sale and It stated only 200 rounds fired asking 540 to get his money back. I didnt bother emailing him but he overpaid in the first place and what other product could you use and resell for your original investment? Nothing comes to mind.

Rontherunner
January 18, 2010, 10:55 PM
there are a lot of people who will pay a premium for a used gun from an individual so there will be no paper trail.
+1, jmr40

Dr.Rob
January 19, 2010, 01:05 AM
You really need to KNOW what you are shopping for.

You aren't going to GET a pre-war Colt at Walmart are you? Or ANY Colt revolver.

And what something sold for 3 years ago has a bout ZERO relavence on a current price.

ALL guns jumped a bit with the Obamascare, now AR prices are dropping. Can you imagine paying $1200 for stock DPMS or Bushy M4gery now?

Can you buy an 870 Express ANYWHERE for $200?

There is such a thing as 'reasonable' and such a thing as a 'bargain', there's also 'overpriced' and being a cheapskate. You should have an idea what something is selling for in your area before making an outrageously low-ball offer, esp. on NEW firearms, or those relatively new.

12131
January 19, 2010, 01:12 AM
Why does everyone think their guns are worth a fortune?
Because it's their right to ask whatever they want. Seriously. It's your right not to buy them. I don't waste my thought on analyzing this kind of thing anymore than that.:)

squinty
January 20, 2010, 01:27 PM
Nobody is saying anything of the sort from what I've read above.

The market bears what it will. If an owner invests in their gun by making alterations/modifications/enhancements that no one else desires or values, then they will likely see no return on their "investment".

If the cost of the "enhancements" is not recoverable in the current market you are also free to refrain from trying to sell it.
Ever try to sell a car with a bunch of aftermarket stuff on it? Doesn't necessarily enhance the resale value.

Rembrandt
January 20, 2010, 01:41 PM
My interests trend to unique one of a kinds.....that way if they are ever sold I don't have to compete price wise with the average going rate.

BURN
January 20, 2010, 01:55 PM
no what kills me is that if I was to build a 1911...yes I went to school to learn how to do it right....and the parts cost me $1000.00 if I try to sell it as a quality pistol at about $1200.00 people think I am asking an unfair price for a "Parts guns".....I have only talked about going into business for myself and asked questions...

or when people expect me to ply my trade for "FREE" I went into debt to learn what I know.......

to the OP...I see both sides of it...but mostly agree with you....say a 95%/05% split

481
January 20, 2010, 03:36 PM
Nobody is saying anything of the sort from what I've read above.

The market bears what it will. If an owner invests in their gun by making alterations/modifications/enhancements that no one else desires or values, then they will likely see no return on their "investment".

If the cost of the "enhancements" is not recoverable in the current market you are also free to refrain from trying to sell it.


Are you agreeing or disagreeing with what I have posted?

Seems you've re-iterated my point (as expressed above) in your statement below:

Ever try to sell a car with a bunch of aftermarket stuff on it? Doesn't necessarily enhance the resale value.

Dookie
January 21, 2010, 04:31 AM
I also have noticed that the people who complain about prices being to high are still thinking prices are the same as ten or twenty years previous. Then you have the "it was cheaper in my day" crowd. "I paid $39 for this marlin new". With inflation that is about $400 bucks.

Most people think that their rifle was new at $500, they spend $50 on mounts and rings, and $300 on a scope. Then spring comes around and they need money and don't want to get hosed but are willing to negotiate the price.

I ran a lot of booths at swap meets, price high and deal, people think they are getting a great price.

coloradokevin
January 21, 2010, 04:41 AM
People who spend hard earned money on things like to think whatever they're buying doesn't depreciate.

You should see the raised eyebrows when the annual Glock Days sale comes around and cops are told what their used Glocks are worth in trade on a new one.

Of course, they don't mind paying a low price for a new one ...

Very true. Believe me, I sure raised an eyebrow when I asked about a sell price on one of my Glocks at the last "Glock Days" event I attended... $125 for a Generation 3 Glock in absolutely excellent condition. I quite confident that I can do better than that price without gouging anyone!

I don't often sell guns, and chose not to sell that particular gun (it is still my duty weapon today).

I understand that a lot of folks don't believe that their guns can depreciate, but I also know that I can sell a Glock for more than $125. If not, please direct me to the place where I can buy used glocks in great condition for $125! I'll be all over that deal :)

squinty
January 21, 2010, 07:00 AM
Are you agreeing or disagreeing with what I have posted?

Seems you've re-iterated my point (as expressed above) in your statement below:
I was agreeing with you. As with guns, so with cars and many other items.

mcdonl
January 21, 2010, 08:12 AM
Here is an example for a local (www.unclehenrys.com) on line/print trading publication....

M-44 Mosin Nagant Carbine in 7.62x54R. 98% Condition. All matching Serial Numbers Great Bore and rifling Not beat up at all. Comes with bayonet, original sling and leather. exelent condition Rare Find!!!!!!!! all original no relpacement parts, in great condition. Own a piece of Histroy. Will sell for $250 FIRM or trade for nice newer pistol ONLY . will not trade for anything else. call or e-mail to see it yourself. great rifle!.

So, someone will read this and say WOW! A piece of history for ONLY $250 and scoop it right up.

I used to get PISSED at these guys and I would send them links such as this one....

http://www.centerfiresystems.com/RUSGUN9130.aspx

And I would as what me their gun so special... but it is not worth it, and like PT Barnum says..... There is a fool born every minute.

PT1911
January 21, 2010, 08:17 AM
funny story... well sad story that happens to be funny also.

A woman came into a friends gun shop with all of her late husband's guns. He told her to sell them when he died and live off of the money. So.. she had an old beat up sporterized carcano, some 30-30, and a run of the mill smith and wesson 38 snubbie... all together worth about 800 bucks to someone being really nice.

After she left with her apraisals, a guy at the shop couldnt help but say what we were all thinking... "He must not have wanted her to live very long."

justashooter in pa
January 21, 2010, 09:45 AM
i have a stevens 335 that i bought at auction for $110 a few months ago. the local gander has the same gun in the same condition on the rack for $350.

nachosgrande
January 21, 2010, 10:42 AM
Because people will pay it. Look at GunBroker. You can't really ever find a deal there because other people pay more used for the same I gun I can get new.

hometheaterman
January 21, 2010, 12:13 PM
I also have noticed that the people who complain about prices being to high are still thinking prices are the same as ten or twenty years previous. Then you have the "it was cheaper in my day" crowd. "I paid $39 for this marlin new". With inflation that is about $400 bucks.

Most people think that their rifle was new at $500, they spend $50 on mounts and rings, and $300 on a scope. Then spring comes around and they need money and don't want to get hosed but are willing to negotiate the price.

I ran a lot of booths at swap meets, price high and deal, people think they are getting a great price.


This is not the case with me although, I do realize the prices have gone up in years. I don't know what guns cost 20 years but I do know what some cost today. I know right now I can go to Walmart and buy a Remington 870 express for $287 or so. I checked yesterday while at Walmart. I think it was $287 it was $280 something. So I don't at all think $280 is fair for a used one. It seems like most of them I see for sale they want high $200 range for.

I also know I can purchase a Savage model 10 with a cheap Simmons scope at Walmart for right under $400. It's like $387 or something similar. This is with the accu trigger. However, recently I saw one of those and the guy wanted $550 for it and he said it had a Simmons scope. He may have changed the scope but since it's the same brand one that it comes with in the package I kind of doubt it not to mention even if he did a Simmons scope isn't worth that much anyway.

Then I saw another one that was an older model 10 and that guy wanted $370 for it. This was the non accu trigger version and I don't think it had a scope but I can't remember for sure. If it had one it was something also worth not much like a Simmons but I don't think it had one. Anyway, why in the world would he think anyone would pay $370 for his used gun when they could go to Walmart and buy a new one for $387 that was much nicer?




I've also noticed a lot of guys say that the gun has only had a box of shells through it. I guess they think that means it should be worth more. To me that doesn't matter at all as almost every time I've looked at a gun that was used I was told it doesn't have much more than a box of shells through it. Some of the time I've known it to not be true. Unfortunately since so many people lie about that you can't really believe anyone who says it anymore.

481
January 21, 2010, 12:16 PM
I was agreeing with you. As with guns, so with cars and many other items.

Got it. Thanks. :)

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