Question about .223 Rem FMJ bullets


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NorCalRanches
January 20, 2010, 01:48 AM
Probably a dumb question, but I usually shoot (and all I've ever reloaded) Nosler or Hornady varmint and hunting bullets.

Got a bunch of Remington 55 grn FMJ bullets to load up for plinking and just to have... for a rainy day... or something. These are not jacketed on the base of the bullet. The lead core is exposed. Is this how all FMJ bullets are? I thought the base had to be covered to prevent leading, etc. I pulled a couple of bullets out of some Mil surp rounds I have, and the jacket covers the base on those.

Is this normal? Bullets seem fine otherwise for cheap bullets. Consistent weight and size. Good price I thought at $41/500.

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Randy1911
January 20, 2010, 01:55 AM
A lot of FMJ bullets are that way. It cost more to make them totally jacketed. I loaded some FMJ-BT the other day and they wee that way.

rcmodel
January 20, 2010, 01:00 PM
55 grain FMJ-BT GI bullets hardly ever have a covered base.
In fact, I don't recall ever seeing one that was, except for tracers.

Leading will not be a problem.
Fine accuracy will be though.

FMJ bullets are not as accurate as bullets made with the jacket opening in the nose.
This is due to the open base not being as consistently square with the muzzle crown on every one. That causes bullet tipping on muzzle exit due to more gas escaping sooner on the uneven side.

rc

Shawn Dodson
January 20, 2010, 01:20 PM
A lead slug is inserted into a copper (guilding metal) cup.

To make an HP or SP bullet the bullet is swaged (formed) so that the opening is at the tip.

To make an FMJ bullet the bullet is swaged so that the opening is at the base.

ants
January 20, 2010, 01:51 PM
To avoid frustration, take rc model's advice to heart. FMJ is a good military and plinking bullet, but never know for accuracy.

Also, often they aren't consistent in length, ogive, cannelure location or weight. Don't worry if your OAL varies, that would be normal.

Your Nosler and Hornady varmint choices are very much known for consistency and accuracy, so keep your expectations in check when you load fmj.

NorCalRanches
January 20, 2010, 03:05 PM
Thanks all. I figured as much, but didn't know much about them, now I know! I figured they weren't going to be nearly as accurate as a Nosler B-Tip, but should be fine for what I wanted... just something to throw downrange. I have my own range and often get family that visits and wants to shoot something, these ought to kill a can at 20 paces ;) Anything to keep the city relatives interested in shooting.

Thanks again.

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