Looking to seal my reloaded rounds for storage what do I need?


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Hans1944
January 22, 2010, 03:08 AM
Greetings all, I am producing a surplus of rounds which will be sitting in a ammo can. Ive heard about a type of coating you can seal the primers of your finished rounds with. Does anyone know where or what this product is called and how good is it?

Thank ya kindly.

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ArchAngelCD
January 22, 2010, 03:51 AM
Sorry I don't know the name of the product but I've found no primer sealant is needed if you vacuum pack the ammo. It's a cheap way of storing your "extra" ammo and it's air and water tight.

tommyintx
January 22, 2010, 03:52 AM
Clear fingernail polish!

Quoheleth
January 22, 2010, 07:11 AM
Midway has something they sell...I don't recall the name, but saw it in a recent sale flyer... that seals primer pocket and around the bullet/case crimp.

But, it seems to me, storing in an airtight case is easier & cheaper.

Q

Rollis R. Karvellis
January 22, 2010, 08:48 AM
+1 on the nail polish, just a dab on a tooth pick. Don't waste your money on any supper dooper magice sealint, just ask your female freinds for there old stuff. You will have more then you ever need. Unless you plan on storing the ammo in a bucket of water, they should stay drie and, usable for a very long time.

moooose102
January 22, 2010, 08:52 AM
this is the stuff you want. i have sealed lots of bullets / primers with this. i am on my 2nd bottle of it. nail polish will certainly seal your ammo as well. i am just not so sure how it will act inside your gun when you fire them.

http://www.midwayusa.com/viewproduct/?productnumber=954332

wgaynor
January 22, 2010, 09:36 AM
You can also color code the year you loaded them with fingernail polish...red 2009 blue 2010....

snuffy
January 22, 2010, 10:38 AM
what do I need?

NOTHING! Primers and bullets are a press fit. Meaning they fit very tightly together. As such, they don't leak under normal conditions. A persons house, garage, or car would be normal conditions. That applies to rifle and handgun ammo. Shotshell, is another story all by itself.

rcmodel
January 22, 2010, 11:25 AM
Exactly.
Don't waste your time, and your finger-nail polish.

If you plan to store it in sealed GI ammo cans, there is no possible way anything can get inside to contaminate the ammo until you open the lid again.

If you don't open the lid outside in a rain storm, or in the shower while taking a bath, you don't have a problem.

rc

delta53
January 22, 2010, 11:27 AM
is what I have used alot but I think good storage is all you need to keep it fresh for as long as you need,The sealer might keep it longer but I shoot 45acp ammo from ww2 that works 98% of the time and that is from 1943
How long you plan on living ? in sixty or seventy years I will only need (1) good bullitt probally sooner:evil:

oneounceload
January 22, 2010, 12:21 PM
The George and Roy's primer sealer is basically clear nail polish.

Buy some small dessicant pieces, put them in your ammo can with a good seal, and close and forget for a long time

tango2echo
January 22, 2010, 02:32 PM
I pack 100rds in a FoodSaver bag, seal lightly, and toss into an ammo can. They'll be ok to shoot a 100 years from now.

fguffey
January 22, 2010, 03:57 PM
I am not a fan of loading ahead and storing, If I wanted to store 'anything' that would be protected from the atmosphere I would heat an ammo can, 30 cal, 20mm or 50cal and load it up while it was was hot, slam the lid shut and leaver the latch over, just make sure you do not over-do it, as in atmospheric pressure crushing it after the can cools off, If you decide to test the seal later first check to see if the can still has the pucker look, as in the pressure on the outside is higher than the inside.

F. Guffey

snuffy
January 22, 2010, 04:54 PM
I load for my family hunting ammo. Years back, a nephew dropped a .280 shell in the snow. We were tracking a deer right then, so he didn't try to find it. Next summer,(6 months later), we found that round laying there. It was a nickel plated brass, so only the Nosler BT was a dark copper color. We were going to do some plinking, he had his rifle along. We proceeded to shoot that shell, it worked perfectly!

How much different is that to being stored in a house or garage? Vastly different, this is Wisconsin, where if you don't like the weather, wait 5 minutes, it'll change. Melting snow then rain then gradually rising temps must have been the worst of conditions.

You've been told that you're worrying about nothing. It doesn't matter, worry about more important things.

W.E.G.
January 22, 2010, 05:04 PM
Why do you think you need to "seal" your primers?

Go to Wal-Mart.

Buy a box of commercial hunting ammo.

Do you see any "sealant" on the primer?

Gatofeo
January 22, 2010, 09:22 PM
Of greater concern than a sealant is the environment in which you will store the ammo.
Store it in a shed out back and you're inviting trouble. Sure, it may be protected against moisture by using a sealant, but not against wide ranges of temperature!
Temperature, especially high heat, is the real enemy of smokeless powder. Granted, high humidity might creep in around a bullet or primer over time but if the primer or bullet are a good fit it's not so likely.
Keep ammo in your gararge, vehicle or shed and summer heat will adversely affect the smokeless powder, perhaps the primer as well.
I've always kept my ammo in my spare room, in the house, where temperatures are pretty much constant throughout the year.
I wouldn't worry about sealing the primer or bullet. Worry more about exposing it to a cycle of high heat and bitter cold.
Interestingly, black powder is more forgiving when it comes to such extremes. But the primer may not be.
Store all ammo away from such extremes and it will be good for decades. Store it in such extremes and it may go sour in months. :uhoh:

FROGO207
January 23, 2010, 12:21 AM
Yep Snuffy is right I often will pick up old ammo that careless relatives have dropped and left in the dirt at our family pit the next year. They will fire OK after I clean the dirt and such off them. The weather in Maine is not a picnic either. I find them while scrounging all brass I can to reload.:D

Sunray
January 23, 2010, 12:39 AM
"...in sealed GI ammo cans..." As long as the gasket is in place it'll be fine. Not forever though. I open my cans and get the smell.

bds
January 23, 2010, 12:59 AM
+1 for vacuum packing.

I put 100 rounds in the bag and use Permanent marker for date/load info. I rotate out the "SHTF" lot annually - In case of "SHTF", I can issue 100 round bags to each person for easy waterproof carry in their ammo vest/pockets.

Out of curiosity, I have run long-term test of exposed reloaded ammunition stored in the garage since 1995. I have shot samples every few years and although brass/copper have tarnished, they still shoot fine.

BTW, they were reloaded with Winchester 231 powder and Winchester primers.

tango2echo
January 23, 2010, 02:25 AM
I also store new factory ammo in the FoodSaver bags for longterm storage, as well as breaking up .22lr bricks into 100 or 200 round lots. Makes it easy to grab for a quick bit of plinking. In fact, the only ammo I DON'T store like this is what I plan to shoot in the next few months.

No Air=No Oxygen=No Corrosion

Cosmoline
January 23, 2010, 03:21 AM
NOTHING! Primers and bullets are a press fit

Well yes and no. Under ordinary household conditions for practice and test loads, no primer sealants are needed. If you're going to be hauling them around in the woods or if they're going to be exposed to high humidity then a primer seal is a good idea. I've had powder ruined with loads I took out fishing.

I use the stuff from Midway. Works good and a little goes a long way.

Remember to clearly label your loads when you stow them. I use freezer bags with the load info written on the outside.

Rollis R. Karvellis
January 23, 2010, 06:31 AM
Here is another extream example; Mamorial weekend a few years ago went to some land I had a range at, had a picnick with freinds and, family. Plenty of shooting. At the end of the day packed up, in the dark. A bucket of .45's was missed, sat for about three weeks in the open. Ohio in the spring = lot's of rain. There was about 2'' of water over the bullit's when I, found them three week's later. shot them up with no problem.

JDGray
January 23, 2010, 06:55 AM
I had a minor flood in my basement, where a few boxes of 9mm reloads took on some water. They all shot just fine with no sealants. I would agree that GI ammo boxes, would do the trick;)

Franco
January 23, 2010, 07:46 AM
Another option, or additional measure, is to put some silica moisture absorbing packets in the ammo can. Cabelas sells many sizes for use in gun cabinets or cases. I have ammo boxes for all different calibers and I put one of the smaller silica packs in each then replace them every so often. It doesn't protect against all of the other potential harms (changing temps, etc) but if you're storing in a normal place, they should remain potent for many many years and they are cheap.

snuffy
January 23, 2010, 08:02 PM
Okay, how about I prove there's nothing to worry about?! Since I'm "into" disproving loaded round tumbling being dangerous, how about I take 50 rounds of the same 40 S&W I just tumbled for 48 hours, go outside, bury 25 in a snowbank? 50 round midway/FA box, open, bullet down, case base up. Another 25 from the same batch saved inside where I normally store the ammo.

How's 6 months sound? That would be June 23rd. Exposed to snow now, melting then rain, sun and everything else central Wisconsin can throw at us. It'll take a while, but should prove whether that will cause problems. I'm betting it won't.

What do ya think? Should I?

atvalaska
January 23, 2010, 08:56 PM
Okay, how about I prove there's nothing to worry about?! Since I'm "into" disproving loaded round tumbling being dangerous, how about I take 50 rounds of the same 40 S&W I just tumbled for 48 hours, go outside, bury 25 in a snowbank? 50 round midway/FA box, open, bullet down, case base up. Another 25 from the same batch saved inside where I normally store the ammo.

How's 6 months sound? That would be June 23rd. Exposed to snow now, melting then rain, sun and everything else central Wisconsin can throw at us. It'll take a while, but should prove whether that will cause problems. I'm betting it won't.

What do ya think? Should I?
yes u should, but i think u should only have to wait till "memorial day 2010" shoot them off and lay this thread to rest! :).....i store in ammo cans in there boxes with that dryz air u get at dept stores...Never missed a lick yet...........

agd1953
January 23, 2010, 09:28 PM
Seal them in a Food Saver vacuum sealer. Seals them air free and water tight. ;)

fguffey
January 24, 2010, 06:54 AM
Snuffy, if it is important to SEAL ammo use a vacuum 'the old fashion way' CANNING JARS'!! Use wide mouth jars, heat the jar, load the ammo, install the lid tightly, then wait for the ping/pop of the lid sealing, it is not necessary to count the ping of sealing jars, after a sufficient amount of time all the jars should seal, to check for seal use the visual test, all the lids should have the pucker look, just like the ammo can.

THEN! have labels printed or print your own "IN AN EMERGENCY! BREAK GLASS"

F. Guffey

But this would be the same problem in reverse, the atmosphere in the jar outside the ammo is low pressure and dry, the atmosphere inside the the ammo has the same atmosphere and moisture content that was in it when it was loaded, will the vacuum in the jar, over time, reduce the atmosphere/pressure/moisture inside the loaded ammo or will the jar stabilize all three. It maynot be a good ideal to reload on a rainey day.

fguffey
January 24, 2010, 08:46 AM
...all three? ...it may not be....

sorry about that,

F. Guffey

Lafeswede
January 24, 2010, 09:53 AM
Greetings,
Just an addendum from my own experiences; when I turned fifty, I was presented a beautiful hand made leather holster and ammo belt for my .45 revolver. That Vaquero is now shattered, but that's another story. I filled the loops with ammo, it looked real cool. For some reason they sat there for about 6 months, before i decided to use them at the range. Of the 20 rounds, three were misfires. I have never before had a primer go dead on me. I believe moisture from the leather was the reason. The bullet to case fit is tight, with a good crimp, starline brass and federal large pistol primers, standard stuff.
I bought a bottle of cheap nail polish for three bucks and problem solved. The polish remnants will wear off in the tumbler.
Lafe

woodsoup
January 24, 2010, 11:12 AM
LocTite #290 wicking sealant.

FuzzyBunny
January 24, 2010, 11:38 AM
Foodsavers have a very nice mason jar attachment! Some use mason jars and some use mayonaise jars.

I have some .22s that are at least 30 years old and been stored in some sort of almost 3 foot tall rectangular mil ammo can. Every time its opened I pull out the sock I use and dump out the O2 absorber and silica pack and replave with fresh. I store all my O2 and silica absorbers in seperate vac packed mason jars to keep them active. I only open the mil .22 can (that weighs a darn ton!) every 4 or 5 years. All the .22s shoot like brand new except the Thunderbolts which are unreliable when even new. My match grade .22 are spot on like brand new after 30+ years. I will never shoot all these in my lifetime but if I keep this storage system up I'm sure my grandkids will be shooting them in 50 years.

This has seemed to work well with silver I keep in smaller mil ammo cans to prevent tarnish.

I use the foodsaver bags to vac pack any pistol I don't plan to shoot after a soaking in oil. My grandfathers 1911 has been packed like this since I first got the foodsaver 15 years ago. I opened it last year and did a disassembly and it was just like it was when vac packed, minus the wood grips of course. I only opened it up because it was double vac packed and the outside bag got a pinhole when being moved. The inside bag was not punctured. Some may say shoot the things and don't store them! They have sentimental value and have been passed to me with with letters on acid free paper from my relatives and are to be meant to be kept in the family. Also included are pics of my relatives with the firearms. So its really a archive thing.

Note: Remove all wood before packing the firearm in an oil soaked vac pack bag!. Also the foodsaver bags can be cut to any length and works with rifles too just be sure to pad the pointy parts so they don't poke the bag.

Mason jar vac pack is also great for primers and powder. BTW I do not do not work for Foodsaver and can't afford to buy the company.

Sorry I drifted off topic so much.

ps. I also keep all spare parts sets vac packed. Seperate bag I also keep all gun related manuals but keep them in the same box with the firearm.

lgbloader
January 24, 2010, 12:39 PM
I guess I kinda take the old school approach. Hand gun ammo, I use zip lock baggies for lots of 100 or 50 and then store in ammo cans. same thing with 223 Rem. Never had an issue.
Rifle gets stored in plastic cases except for all the surplace which is in battle packs and spam cans.

LGB

snuffy
January 24, 2010, 12:58 PM
Snuffy, if it is important to SEAL ammo use a vacuum 'the old fashion way' CANNING JARS'!!

fguffey, my purpose posting my proposed test was to dis-prove the need for any extensive protection. Primer sealants, vacuum packing are NOT necessary! Six months exposed to Wisconsin's notorious weather UNPROTECTED should prove ammo could survive just about any normal storage conditions.

If you have some G.I. ammo cans, then by all means store your ammo in them. They will keep things the way they were when put in there.

Claude Clay
January 24, 2010, 01:10 PM
i load for 4 people and we shoot each friday....

i can not even start to imagine the feeling of having more ammo
on hand than gets shot up in a week:confused:

please, please tell me more........;)

delta5
January 24, 2010, 01:26 PM
Its interesting to note that the soviet block 7.62x39 with the green lacquer cases (I have some 8mm mauser like this too..) all have that red sealant around the crimp and the primer...

Duce1
January 24, 2010, 01:38 PM
Nail polish for the primer side and I store most of my ammo in large plastic ammo carrying boxes or the steel military cans. I keep the silica packs that come in stuff I buy and put it in the cans with them for moister as well.

rcmodel
January 24, 2010, 01:59 PM
Its interesting to note that the soviet block 7.62x39 with the green lacquer cases (I have some 8mm mauser like this too..)Almost all military ammo has lacquer sealed primers and asphalt sealed bullet/case joints.
Soviet ammo is all steel case, and will rust if any moisture at all gets in the primer/case joint.

But military ammo is designed for total immersion in combat conditions.

It's very unlikely you will be setting in the rain, in a fox hole full of water, for weeks at a time with your reloads.

As already noted several times, reloads stored in good GI steel ammo cans will last far longer then you will.

There is absolutely no good reason to seal the primers on reloads stored in ammo cans.

There is no need for desiccant packs either.
The military does not use them in ammo cans, and there is no need for you too either.

rc

delta5
January 24, 2010, 04:09 PM
I bought a few cans of that Indian .308 that was buried in the ground for years supposedly on the Pakistan border. It was a standard US ammo can. The cans were kinda cruddy, but when I opened them, the insides were perfect. No leaks or stains.

My(2)Cents
January 24, 2010, 04:37 PM
The military stores rounds in ammo cans... turns out thatís what they are made for.
As long as they are in ammo cans inside in a climate controlled environment they will last as long as you will ever need them.

delta5
January 24, 2010, 05:05 PM
It was definately not first quality ammo, but it was priced right and it did shoot. The cases were cheap, and the OAL's were all over the place, like they were done by hand. Very sloppy.

Wildkow
January 24, 2010, 11:16 PM
I put an small open plastic baggie of reloaded (a commercial reloader not me) 9mm in the trunk of my 1994 Ford Exploder over ten years ago, total about 30-40 rounds. California's San Joaquin Valley gets very hot and we drove that Exploder all over the Western United States in all kinds of weather including -20 F degrees below zero. The back of that Exploder wasn't babied it carried all kinds of crap and got quite wet and dirty. The bag of rounds was filthy and some where very corroded when I sold the Exploder in 2006. I pulled them out and tossed them into a drawer in the garage. Just recently 05/09 when I started shooting again I pulled them out and tossed them into my newly purchased tumbler for about 12 hours, some of the corrosion never came off so I tossed about a dozen of them in for another over night run in the tumbler. After that I took them to the range. Low and behold they all went bang in my G19! I surmise that those reloaded rounds were 10-12 years old. :D


Wildkow

fguffey
January 26, 2010, 10:07 AM
Snuffy, forgive, that must not have went the way I intended, there are other ways to seal out the atmosphere and lower the moisture content, long time storage for food grains in 55 galleon barrels is possible with the use of gases that are inert and heavier than air, in a vacuum moisture boils at zero degree F, and air that has been run through a compressor has the moisture squeezed out of it, moisture is separated from the atmosphere when compressed.

F. Guffey

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