Why do people sell guns that are allegely "NIB" and "never fired"


PDA






leadcounsel
January 23, 2010, 02:33 AM
Curious as to why so many guns are advertised as "New In Box" and/or "Never Fired." Are we to really believe that someone went out and bought a gun from an FFL brand new only to decide later that they wanted to turn around and sell it, probably at a small loss?

If you enjoyed reading about "Why do people sell guns that are allegely "NIB" and "never fired"" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!
Oro
January 23, 2010, 02:38 AM
Couple things:

1) Yep, people do indeed buy guns and never shoot them. Then they need cash or get some version of buyer's remorse.

2) Technically, those aren't "NIB" guns. Only guns new from a dealer are "New." Even if they take it home and wrap it up, it's used. If they go to sell it, they can advertise it as "ANIB" - meaning as new in the box, but not NIB.

481
January 23, 2010, 02:39 AM
Semantic distinctions aside, it happens.

New is new. Unfired is unfired.

I have several "safe queens" intended as legacy and inheritance pieces.

While I've no plans to sell them ever, I have several friends who've attempted to do the same thing as I have and had to liquidate a few due to financial hardship.

Some of those now sit in my safe and were obtained at very nice (for me, that is) prices.

Rexster
January 23, 2010, 02:40 AM
Yes. Most folks never, or rarely, shoot their guns. I work security one day a week at a jewelry store, that used to be a full-line pawn shop. One of the older employees there told me that 90% of the guns that people pawned or sold were unfired. Many had dings from being kept in a drawer with other things, but fired little, if at all.

wankerjake
January 23, 2010, 02:43 AM
Yeah it happens. I sold a ruger LCR for a lady I work with that she never fired. She doesn't shoot much. She bought it, her husband lost his job, so she had me sell it. Now are all the NIB claims for real...I doubt it.

A lot of folks aren't as into guns and shooting as we are.

Ed Ames
January 23, 2010, 02:44 AM
In some cases it's because they are as-NIB or never fired. I bought one gun which I'm convinced was never fired until I got it...it had zero wear including any signs of brass feeding through the magazines, but (expected, normal) wear developed after the first 10rds I fired. It was 20+ years old when I got it. It wasn't represented as never fired, but evidence is evidence. Most of the guns I buy are old and heavily used, 'cause that's what I like.

Most of the time, though, I think people are just liars. They clean the guns before they sell, and if the gun cleans up well they call it unfired, thinking it'll get them an extra dollar.

jakemccoy
January 23, 2010, 02:45 AM
I hate to admit it, but I have two rifles bought over two years ago that I've never shot. I just haven't gotten around to it. The rifle range is inconvenient, and my handguns and shotguns have served well to get the edge off.

trbon8r
January 23, 2010, 02:47 AM
I'm taking a rifle I bought and never fired to a local shop tomorrow to see if I can work a trade towards something I actually will fire. :)

Not likely I will work a deal though. Gun dealers like to buy a gun from some schmuck for $200 and put it in the rack for $500, while charging you full boat retail and then some for what they have in the case. :rolleyes:

Rexster
January 23, 2010, 03:00 AM
I have several I have not yet fired, but I am in a pre-retirement acquisition mode, buying while I can afford them. Also, I live in a small city, surrounded my a sprawling mega-metroplex, so getting out of town to shoot much is not easy. I plan to move after I retire, and live on enough acreage to shoot at least handguns, shotguns, and rimfires on my own property.

Dazen
January 23, 2010, 04:24 AM
I have a Bushmaster Predator that has been sitting in the safe for 3 years that still has yet to be fired along with a Colt SAA in 44-40. I also live in an area where there are no real gun ranges to speak off. There are 200,000 people around here and only one range. That one range is garbage and they charge $200 every September 2nd or something like that. Doesn't matter when you joined you have to pay those dues that date, screw that.

pancakeofdoom
January 23, 2010, 04:25 AM
i had an FEG GKK .45 i bought for $150 that was "used".

stripped it down and it seemed as though it had never been opened up, fired even once, and it still had the factory shipping goo on the inside.

yongxingfreesty
January 23, 2010, 04:40 AM
Ive got a couple of glocks i havent touched. they are new and unfired.

nwilliams
January 23, 2010, 04:51 AM
Technically you can sell guns as brand new but you can't be doing it to make a profit, that would make you a dealer and without an FFL and you'd be breaking the law. This also applies to used guns as well. If you buy a new or used gun at a gun shop because you think you can resell it yourself and make a profit then you are breaking the law. At least this is my understanding, I'm no lawyer and I don't play one on the internet.

I've sold guns on gunbroker that were LNIB but I always select "used" when it asks you to state the condition. Besides I've never sold a gun that I didn't shoot at least a couple times before selling it, so I'd be lying if I said any gun I've sold was brand new.

Ed Ames
January 23, 2010, 04:56 AM
Being even more technical, there is absolutely nothing saying you can't sell guns to make a profit. The law says you can't be a dealer without a license, and says:

"The term “dealer” means
(A) any person engaged in the business of selling firearms at wholesale or retail,
(B) any person engaged in the business of repairing firearms or of making or fitting special barrels, stocks, or trigger mechanisms to firearms, or
(C) any person who is a pawnbroker. The term “licensed dealer” means any dealer who is licensed under the provisions of this chapter. "

Making a profit is not the same as running a business. Whether you are running a business is a judgment call involving frequency of sales and so on.

nwilliams
January 23, 2010, 05:04 AM
Being even more technical, there is absolutely nothing saying you can't sell guns to make a profit. The law says you can't be a dealer without a license
True but that is an extremely gray area and I would still tread carefully.

Boba Fett
January 23, 2010, 05:16 AM
Making a profit is not the same as running a business. Whether you are running a business is a judgment call involving frequency of sales and so on.


Assuming you don't come under the definition of dealer as Ed Ames laid out, would it be correct to assume that part of what the ATF looks at is how much of your income can be attributed to the sale of firearms?

For example, if you make $100k a year and $70k is from firearms sales, I would think the ATF would have a problem if you're unlicensed. Clearly you are making your living selling firearms.

But say only $2k of your $100k comes from firearms sales, I doubt they would have any issues.




I suppose the easiest way to find out if someone is concerned about it would be to contact the NRA or the ATF.



As for the OP, I have sold a NIB firearm that I didn't want. I traded for a handgun, put it in the safe, decided about a year later I didn't really want it, waited until there weren't too many of them on GunBroker.com and sold it. I made more than my trade was worth AND more than the dealer had the firearm listed for. I had intended to keep it...I purchased an extra mag and specialty part for it...but I decided I didn't want to start buying 40 S&W. I try not to own every caliber out there, though given the current ammo shortages in places perhaps a little more caliber diversification isn't such a bad thing :p

coloradokevin
January 23, 2010, 05:41 AM
There are certainly a number of folks out there who have NIB guns that they just haven't fired for one reason or another. One of my coworkers routinely buys guns and keeps them only as safe queens. He is a "collector" in the most literal sense of the word, as most of his guns are bought with the express intent of NOT being fired.

Generally speaking, I'm the kind of guy who likes to shoot my guns. I currently have one firearm that hasn't been fired, and that is a commemorative pistol that was made for my department. It has been handled, but is otherwise ANIB. Someday I might shoot it, as I don't ever plan to sell it anyway.

I don't believe there is anything stopping someone from advertising their personally owned firearm as a NIB item, as long as it is NIB. Just because it isn't being offered by an FFL doesn't mean that it is "used". Being used makes a gun used, not being owned and stored in the original box. That said, I'm hesitant to believe a lot of individual sellers on this fact, simply because it would be so easy to shoot a gun while still claiming that it is NIB. By that standard I think it is a safer bet to assume that a firearm that is purchased from a reputable FFL is NIB.

ElToro
January 23, 2010, 06:46 AM
i have a couple of bolt guns i havent had time to get scoped and bore sited. doenst mean i wont shoot the eventually.

i also have several AR lowers (ANIB) but no box, just plastic wrap! and a few mauser actions i havent made in to rifles yet... what to do?

Jim Watson
January 23, 2010, 07:54 AM
Back when we went by NRA descriptions instead of Blue Book percentages, "New" meant "Not previously sold at retail." "Perfect" meant as new in all respects.

The language evolves... or degenerates.

Motodeficient
January 23, 2010, 08:06 AM
Most handguns are fired at the factory. So "unfired" is rarely true anyway.

JTH
January 23, 2010, 08:20 AM
If you have the cash and can afford the rifle/gun and know what you're buying, they can be a good investment for the future. If you would have bought a ****load of SKS's 15 years ago, you'd easily double your purchase price and the same with AKs. Too bad we can't see in to the future!

TexasRifleman
January 23, 2010, 10:07 AM
True but that is an extremely gray area and I would still tread carefully.

It's not a gray area at all. Federal law is very clear on what "in the business" means.

This is only part of it:

"The term “dealer” means
(A) any person engaged in the business of selling firearms at wholesale or retail,
(B) any person engaged in the business of repairing firearms or of making or fitting special barrels, stocks, or trigger mechanisms to firearms, or
(C) any person who is a pawnbroker. The term “licensed dealer” means any dealer who is licensed under the provisions of this chapter. "

You have to look at the definition of "in the business". It is extremely clear:

(C) as applied to a dealer in fire- arms, as defined in section 921(a)(11)(A), a person who devotes time, attention, and labor to dealing in firearms as a regular course of trade or business with the principal objective of livelihood and profit through the repetitive purchase and resale of firearms, but such term shall not include a person who makes occasional sales, exchanges, or purchases of firearms for the en- hancement of a personal collection or for a hobby, or who sells all or part of his personal collection of firearms;

And then, in case it's still not clear, the law goes on to define "principle objective of livelihood and profit"

The term "with the principal objective of livelihood and profit" means that the intent underlying the sale or disposition of firearms is pre- dominantly one of obtaining livelihood and pecuniary gain, as opposed to other intents, such as improving or liq- uidating a personal firearms collection: Provided, That proof of profit shall not be required as to a person who en- gages in the regular and repetitive pur- chase and disposition of firearms for criminal purposes or terrorism.

Tirod
January 23, 2010, 10:26 AM
Having handled a really nice engraved gold Colt .45 in LNIB unfired condition, yeah, they are out there. Guns - especially rare one of a kinds, limited editions, etc are deliberately kept in LNIB or better condition and never fired.

The SHOT Show 2010 had a gold plated Thompson with extra long finned barrel and matching drum magazine. It also had a "Do Not Touch" sign. Unfired guns are actually more numerous in some circles than shooters.

I have a 870 Express 12ga pump about 17 years old in unfired condition. Just never went turkey hunting with it, retail jobs keep interfering, and I have others I do shoot. It does have handling and storage wear, but by golly, it's still as rough as factory new and won't slide open by gravity. Yet it still commands a slight premium over a nicely broken in one.

Go figure.

ClayInTX
January 23, 2010, 10:32 AM
On making a profit:
When you take inflation into account you need to approximately double your money every ten years just to get back your original value.

Of course the IRS doesn’t see it this way.

Edmond
January 23, 2010, 10:50 AM
My rant has something to do with this.

Quite a few folks are out there selling guns that they bought, never been fired (their claim) and want to sell for the same price as a new gun.

But isn't it like a car? If it's been titled, or in the firearms case, the ATF form filled out, it's used, right?

What trips me up even more are the guys who claim that they've never even taken the gun out of the box. Seriously? :scrutiny:

yakkingallover
January 23, 2010, 11:05 AM
As to the original post, yes people do buy guns and never shoot them. I bought my Ruger Blackhawk that way, It was in the used case at my local dealer. They informed me that because it had been sold before it had to be resold as used regardless of condition. After careful inspection I came to the conclusion that the one round fired at the factory was the only round to ever go through that gun. They were having a store wide sale that day and I walked out with a "new" gun for less than half what a true new would have cost.

Balrog
January 23, 2010, 11:08 AM
When you take inflation into account you need to approximately double your money every ten years just to get back your original value.

That is traditional wisdom anyway. Few have done that in the last 10 years.

BruM
January 23, 2010, 11:14 AM
Easy, somebody buys a gun but for variety of reasons doesnít use it. Later a gun fan gets a hold of it and realizes that unfired in the original box has some value. He has other guns so no strong need to shoot it. later it is passed to someone else who also realizes the gun's virginity has value and decides to pass it on to someone who values it more that he does. At least thatís what happened to an unfired 40 YO H&R I inherited.

wlewisiii
January 23, 2010, 12:16 PM
My Taurus 650SS was purchased by me as like new & unfired. The first buyer picked it up, took it home, wife had a fit, he sold it back & I got it for used price instead at the end of last month. Since then I've made sure, several hundred times, that it won't be sold as "unfired" again... ;)

William

Mags
January 23, 2010, 12:20 PM
With all modern firearms (non collectible) I always steer away from the never fired or only 1 box of ammo guns for the following reasons.

1. I don't believe it.
2. They normally want MSRP for a gun I consider used.
3. They fired enough rounds for it to be used and not enough to break in the barrel or action.

The main reason is they normally want what they paid new when I could just get me a new one from a dealer for that price.

Omaha-BeenGlockin
January 23, 2010, 12:25 PM
There's some that I got a great deal on---I put it away--realize 2 two years later that there's something I want more and trade back to that same dealer for more than I paid for it----didn't set out to do that--it just happened that way a few times.

Right at the moment I have 6 unfired guns----mainly because we still have 6ft snowdrifts in the front yard-plus a young child--job and girlfriend---I'm kinda thinking about trading a couple for something else---call me fickle.

Other than the ones I got from grandpa---I don't particularly get attached to any of them and consider them all trading fodder if there's something else I want.

You lose money most of the time--sometimes not---I just consider it an expense of my hobby and addiction.

Mike J
January 23, 2010, 12:36 PM
I saw an ad recently on another forum. They were selling off 70 unfired firearms all owned by the same person. The manufacturerer had even given all the guns the same 3 number prefix to the serial number (they will do that for collectors or would then anyway I don't know about now), I enjoy my guns by using them. Some people enjoy knowing they own them, some just buy them so they know they have a gun if they need it & don't worry about developing skill. I don't understand collectors but thats okay-it's their money.

Z-Michigan
January 23, 2010, 12:49 PM
Are we to really believe that someone went out and bought a gun from an FFL brand new only to decide later that they wanted to turn around and sell it, probably at a small loss?

Yes, really. I currently own two un-fired guns. I'll probably keep (and shoot) both of them, but who knows? One is more than a year old now. If you're a collector and you have more money than free time, it's pretty easy to have this happen. I have also, one time, sold an unfired ANIB gun - I had bought two of the same model at a price I thought was terrific, and after shooting one I decided I didn't need two of them, so I sold the unfired one and kept the one I had tried out (which I still have today).

Magic_Man
January 23, 2010, 12:52 PM
I just bought a 10/22 that sat in the guy's safe for years. It looks to be unfired.

MichaelK
January 23, 2010, 02:25 PM
My last handgun purchase was a 50th anniversary Ruger Super BlackHawk. That is the one gun in my possession that I have not shot and aren't planning on shooting, keeping it for its collector value. And I only payed 350$ for it!

Magic_Man
January 23, 2010, 02:44 PM
Speaking of collecting, we should get a list going of what is hoped/thought to be worth money 20 or so years from now.

jmr40
January 23, 2010, 03:04 PM
I can't speak for others but let me give you an example. About 3 weeks ago I took a Glock 19 and an old Winchester 70 Ranger to a gunshow to try to sell. I had only $250 tied up in each gun and was willing to part with them at that price just to get my money back.

I found no takers, but found a dealer with a brand new Ruger Hawkeye in 35 Whelen priced at $500. About $50-$100 less than they are currently selling for. We made a trade and he gave me $100. So in real money I have a new rifle setting in my safe with the hang tags still attached that I have $400 invested in.

I have not decided If I am going to keep it or not. I will keep the tags on it and if someone offers me enough for it between now and August it is sold. If not I probably will buy a set of dies and start loading for it and keep it.

jakemccoy
January 23, 2010, 03:06 PM
My rant has something to do with this.

Quite a few folks are out there selling guns that they bought, never been fired (their claim) and want to sell for the same price as a new gun.

But isn't it like a car? If it's been titled, or in the firearms case, the ATF form filled out, it's used, right?

What trips me up even more are the guys who claim that they've never even taken the gun out of the box. Seriously?

They can charge whatever they want, and I want them to have that right because I would want that right. You have a choice of not to buy. The value of the gun is the price somebody is willing to pay for it.

I would never believe somebody who claims they never took the gun out the box. Does that mean nobody has come around and taken the gun out to look at it? And am I not allowed to take the gun out the box? That's B.S. I also wouldn't believe a seller who told me the trigger has never been pulled.

Boba Fett
January 23, 2010, 03:21 PM
I would never believe somebody who claims they never took the gun out the box. Does that mean nobody has come around and taken the gun out to look at it? And am I not allowed to take the gun out the box? That's B.S. I also wouldn't believe a seller who told me the trigger has never been pulled.

I agree that never taking it out of the box seems unlikely. Whenever I've purchased a firearm, they always open it, show me that the contents are all there, and close it back up.

As for not pulling the trigger, the pistol I mentioned in my earlier post had never had the trigger pulled. It had been opened just long enough to check the contents at the show and then once more to put the special slide release and extra mag in the box.


As to the believability, I'm with you on that. If a guy on GunBroker.com said it had never been taken out of the box or the trigger had never been pulled then he'd better be a dealer and not just some guy. But I'd be pretty skeptical anyway.

Ed Ames
January 23, 2010, 03:27 PM
New In Box doesn't mean "never removed from box" ... guns typically go in and out of their boxes several times between manufacturing and final sale as serial numbers are checked and contents are inspected.

bhp9mm
January 23, 2010, 03:28 PM
i have a smith and wesson 610-2 3 inch lew horton that has not been shot

AirplaneDoc
January 23, 2010, 04:53 PM
My grandfather purchased a Winchester 94 about 6 months before he died he never took it out of the box after he brought it home. My grandmother had it for a few decades, and I eventually got it about 13 years ago. I don't even own a box of 30-30's so I have never shot it. It is packed away with the original reciept, in the original box never fired. I am guessing if I chose to sell it, I could make a buck or 2 over the original price.

thebigc
January 23, 2010, 04:56 PM
i could see it happening i have a 45/70 i bought and its like 9 months later and i still havent got out to shoot it i ran some snap caps through it and played with it a little but no live fireing. its easy to do around here i dont belong to a range with hipower rifle and cant use it hunting and only shoot my pistols a few times a year

Waffen tragen
January 23, 2010, 05:13 PM
I have several guns that are unfired, however, I have no plans to sell them.
I have my "shooters" and my "safe queens". I have to say I'm always leery of NIB unless I buy it NIB.

Erik M
January 23, 2010, 06:13 PM
Seems like I saw a thread on the Transactions forum where a buyer argued with the seller about the firearm not appearing 'unfired' because it was dirtier than ones he had looked at in a store. Personally I dont think you could refer to any weapon as truly unfired with no exception due to the fact that the factory test fires them.

ElToro
January 23, 2010, 06:33 PM
jmr40.. see, i'd buy that rifle right now at $400 if it was private party. $35 at the FFL, no tax. But by the time you add shipping and my FFL inbound fee were up to $550. and sometimes they want to add sales tax. the deal kind of lust some luster.

i guess the semantics falls on which side of the deal your on. when im buying, oh you took it out once and fondled it? its used. if im selling, its been hermetically selaed since it left the makers plant.

My shooting buddy gave me a Ruger Mark 11 .22 that he won at a NRA dinner. box, papers, everything all there. he never fired it after picking it up from the FFL. should i have kept it virginal ? i have shot a box of 50 through it but you wouldnt know the differnce.

i have been buying all kinds of stuff lately just becuase. i intend to shoot all of it, just havnt found time

redneck2
January 23, 2010, 07:18 PM
I worked part time in a gun shop for a couple of years. Maybe 25% of the guns we took back in trade were unfired. Many of them came back with the original box of ammo. Maybe most common were the uber-magnums like .500 S&W or .458 Win Mags, but common calibers were seen quite regularly.

Guns are a funny deal. People want them just because they want them. We had one guy that would buy as many as five a week, then bring back dozens at a time to get money. I guess it's no different than someone buying something like a NASCAR model car. There's really nothing you can do with it other than look at it. My wife has over 100 Longaberger baskets that cost well over $100 average. Nothing you can do with them either.

And, there is no such thing as a gun that's never been taken out of the box. We ALWAYS checked the SN of the gun versus the one printed on the box.

NMGonzo
January 23, 2010, 07:47 PM
I rather have an aquiantance to tell me "It has not given me any problems in 500 rounds"

That is a gun I am willing to buy.

And never haggle with a friend.

Well. ... I never haggle with anybody regarding guns.

A good price (for me) is spotted; I make my move.

StarDust1
January 23, 2010, 08:11 PM
With all modern firearms (non collectible) I always steer away from the never fired or only 1 box of ammo guns for the following reasons.

1. I don't believe it.
2. They normally want MSRP for a gun I consider used.
3. They fired enough rounds for it to be used and not enough to break in the barrel or action.

The main reason is they normally want what they paid new when I could just get me a new one from a dealer for that price.
I sure as hell don't, if you know what to look for it's ridiculously simple to establish the truth of the claim, many, many people buy a firearm, shoot one box or less through them, then sell them off!
I see this all the time, particularly with large caliber handguns and I'm always checking the newspapers for their inevitable advertisments.
If they've been less then honest about the condition and use(common)it becomes an instant bartering point, one that I cannot ever remember not winning!
Best deals I've ever had, and more importantly, ever will have, come from this type of seller, who is usually just desperate for the money, or have been ordered(law, family, spouse)to get rid of it....

jcwit
January 23, 2010, 09:53 PM
Couple things:

1) Yep, people do indeed buy guns and never shoot them. Then they need cash or get some version of buyer's remorse.

2) Technically, those aren't "NIB" guns. Only guns new from a dealer are "New." Even if they take it home and wrap it up, it's used. If they go to sell it, they can advertise it as "ANIB" - meaning as new in the box, but not NIB.


Not real sure about the "ANIB" as new in box not being correct. Back in the '60's, '70's, '80's, I worked in our local hardware and we had a gentleman that bought/ordered every Winchester Commemorative 94's we could get from the factory. These were delivered to him unopened. Was at his house years later before he passed and asked him about them, at that time he still hd them all, and none were opened, still sealed as from the factory.

BTW his collection was in the 20 plus pices IIRC.

I would say those were "New In Box" no questions asked.

Jim K
January 23, 2010, 11:28 PM
Some folks quibble about what "new" means. Technically, if the gun was made more than one millisecond earlier, it is not "new". But in general, collectors consider a gun "new" if it is (or appears to be) unfired, except for factory test/proof firing. NIB "new in box" means new and in the original box. If papers, targets, cleaning equipment or other items are included, the seller should say so. Some sellers use the term ANIB or LNIB, meaning "as/like new in box" when the gun is new to all intents and purposes, but has, or may have been, fired.

The idea that if the gun was ever purchased it is not new won't really work with guns, as every gun, except those still in the factory, has been sold to someone. And every gun on the market, except those in a dealer's shop, is "used" even if it has never been fired. Should a "used" (previously owned) gun be resold at the "new gun" price? That depends. In some cases, it is not going to happen. No way would I sell a "like new" Luger for the 12 Marks it cost new, or a cased and unfired set of 1860 Colt Army revolvers for their 1862 retail price.

Jim

Boba Fett
January 23, 2010, 11:38 PM
If papers, targets, cleaning equipment or other items are included, the seller should say so.

I always keep the box and everything that came in it. I've had dealers compliment me on keeping everything together.

It really goes a long way in getting you the price you want...kind of gives the dealer/buyer the impression that you're probably anal when it comes to your firearms and haven't abused them.


Basically, this is just eBay selling tactics. You buy a digital camera? Keep the box and all paperwork and accessories it came with. When you go to sell it, you can often ask a higher price or be more likely to make the sale over the guy just selling the loose camera, missing the manual and CD.


Another consideration about NIB is this:

When you go to a gun show or to a shop, they have firearms on the table or in the display cases which are "new." Yet they have been handled and often dryfired. Some people will consider them used, but the dealers consider them new.

22-rimfire
January 23, 2010, 11:45 PM
Curious as to why so many guns are advertised as "New In Box" and/or "Never Fired." Are we to really believe that someone went out and bought a gun from an FFL brand new only to decide later that they wanted to turn around and sell it, probably at a small loss?

Yep! The majority of the firearms I own have never been fired by ME. Most, I have no intention of firing. Bought them stictly to collect, enjoy, and sell later. You can only shoot so many. The firearms that I have owned for a while will not be sold at a loss. Some have appreciated A LOT (4-6x purchase price). Not doing it to make money as in most instances, I would make far more money with a lot less hassle just by buying CD's or investing in mutual funds.

I like 22 rifles and I have a number that I have not shot yet that I bought new from a dealer. Those will eventually get shot. Not something that I worry about. If I decide to sell them before I shoot them, then they will be sold as "unfired" because nobody else shot them except for test firing at the factory.

When selling firearms, it is always a good idea to phrase things as "appears NIB" or "appears As-New" or the term LNIB (if there is a box). There is also the as-new in a correct box. Gets confusing to some.

Hatterasguy
January 24, 2010, 12:03 AM
A lot of people don't shoot the guns they buy. Either because they lose interest or they are collectors.

Its the same as the guys who buy rare cars and don't drive them.


Personaly I prefer to shoot what I have as much as possible. Guns are built to be shoot as much as cars are built to be driven. The one exception is my grandfathers IP M1 Carbine. It has a lot of value so I hardly shoot it.

mm1ut1
January 24, 2010, 12:07 AM
Shortly after buying a Remington 700 SPS in 308 I injured my back and will be out of work for a month at least. I never fired the rifle and it is still in the box. I have it advertized as NIB because it is a common expression and most people know what you mean.

Pilot
January 24, 2010, 12:16 PM
I have several guns I bought on a whim or found what I thought were good deals on that I have never fired. Some are duplicates of guns I already own. A few I bought away as a hedge against various gun bans. All are NIB and unfired. I think its a pretty common occurence with gun enthusiasts.

shenandoah
January 24, 2010, 12:28 PM
NIB should apply only to New guns sold by a FFL dealer. ANIB or 'garage kept' are the terms I use .... the guy at the pawnshop is right, I sell at a pawnshop and the majority of guns are either rust memorials or virgins in the box. I try to give people a break on prices to the boss's chagrin, but volume of sales generally cheers him up. I haven't bought but about one or two NIB firearms in the past five years, because I prefer and can afford the old 'used but loved' garage kept stuff. Pretty don't shoot, but it does sell. Once paper is cut, like a car...it's USED.

TheLastBoyScout
January 24, 2010, 04:05 PM
It took me 4 years to get around to firing my M1... Got it for a graduation, and then was moving around a bunch where it wasn't possible/practical to bring a whole lot of guns with me for a few years so it stayed at my parents house.

Likewise, I've made a face to face deal where the other guy had a gun I really wanted and one I was somewhat interested in... it would have been very possible, had someone made me an offer on the one I was "interested" in, I would have sold it without firing it. But the package price for the two together was more attractive than the price for one.

If you enjoyed reading about "Why do people sell guns that are allegely "NIB" and "never fired"" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!