Hell, I'll just keep it.


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SaxonPig
January 25, 2010, 11:59 PM
Took this in trade from a buddy in a recent gun swap. Wasn't looking for another 1911 but this is what he had to trade and he wanted what I had to sell so I took it mostly to make him happy. Figured I could just sell the 1911 but that didn't work out so good.

Dragged it around two gun shows trying to recoup the $450 I have in it and finally grew weary of people insulting it. So I will keep it. Everyone should have at least one basic, MilSpec 1911, no?

I vaguely recall the gun magazine writers praising these back in the 1980s before Daddy Bush banned Chinese guns. Am I right? Anyone have experience with these (good or bad)?

My friend said he only fired 50 rounds through it and I believe him based on the gun's appearance. I put another 50 through it and it functioned perfectly with 230 ball and the gun shot absolutely dead-on at 25 years.

What think of this model? Thumbs up or thumbs down? Seems to be a nearly exact replica of the 1911A1 save for the slightly upgraded sights.


http://www.fototime.com/86B6A531B76F4D4/standard.jpg

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atblis
January 26, 2010, 12:01 AM
Good guns. $450 is probably close to the going rate.

denfoote
January 26, 2010, 12:19 AM
You got a Nork??

You better as hell hold on to it!!!

I have two Norks: an SKS and a Makarov. Both are well made guns. The rifle I have shot, the pistol remains unfired.

REAPER4206969
January 26, 2010, 12:21 AM
It was Clinton that banned Norinco imports.

bds
January 26, 2010, 12:23 AM
And Bush extended the ban.

Wow, brings me back memories. Back in 1995, when I didn't have much money, other seasoned match shooters told me to build my match gun on the Norinco frame using Wilson combat parts (took me 4 hours just to hand fit the high-rise beaver tail using a diamond file - then they told me, "4 hours? we just use the dremel" :cuss:). Many of them also built their match 1911 on the Norinco frame and we did all the gunsmith work - trigger job, chamber/ramp polish, etc.

Compared to other 1911s available on the market at that time, it was a very accurate pistol out of the box and shot even better after the custom work. I believe I got 1"-1.5" group using hand rest at 15 yards (our matches back then were indoors so 15 yards were the most we could setup). Norinco's fit/finish was decent, but the Norinco shot better than the Auto Ordnance (only other 1911 in my budget range).

I sold the heavily modified Norinco (with Haarts Mercury Filled recoil spring set) few years later when I could afford nicer 1911s, but it still have a place in my match shooting memories. Of course, holding a Kimber/STI absolutely gives me memory block and new level of happiness. :D

Keep it! Shoot it often! And smile BIG

I also had a Norinco NHM-91 that I sold before the assault weapons ban, but that's another thread discussion.

I gotta move out of California :cuss::banghead:

stangfan93
January 26, 2010, 12:47 AM
Keep it. I bought my norinco 1911 6 years ago and I love it. It was heavily modified before I bought. Got a heck of a deal on it as well. The only thing original on my gun is the slide and frame. That's the important part as well because the metal is very hard. Not hard where it is brittle but it will dull out milling parts quickly. $450 is about the going rate because people know their worth now. Here is mine.

http://i4.photobucket.com/albums/y114/Stangfan93/IMGP1774.jpg

Oro
January 26, 2010, 05:07 AM
Thumbs up or thumbs down? Seems to be a nearly exact replica of the 1911A1 save for the slightly upgraded sights.

Yes, thumbs up. I've had one since '93 and can't ever find a reason to let it go. I've upgraded it over the years a bit but I've never altered the slide/frame fit or barrel; it's still basically functioning as delivered. $450 for one in that condition is a good deal, so you definitely retrieved your money out of whatever it was you were shopping around.

What I did do that really perked mine up immediately was put in a guide rod and new spring. It was reliable out of the box, but it definitely ran more smoothly with that. Later on I mic'd the barrel (.583") and the slide (.700"), and found a tighter bushing. The stock bushing was .586/.695 and a little too sloppy for my tastes (I have a spread sheet with all my 1911 specs so no, I'm not recalling that from memory!). I think a stock SA match bushing gave just a perfect match fit without any fitting. Also I installed a Group-gripper guide rod. It really shoots well and after some tweaking has one of the nicest 1911 triggers you could ask for.

Now that for a while I have had some other "beater" stock 1911's for knock about-duty - an FMAP (aka "sistema") Colt and nicely worn Series '70, I've decided to actually promote the Norinco. I will have the slide serrations re-cut (they are rough on most all of them), and the frame nickeled and the slide high-polished and blued. I've always been fond of this 1911 and along with a S&W revolver and that well-used Colt Series '70, it is what sits in the night stand.

The only non-spec part on it I recall is that the frame's bushing holes and the corresponding bushing mounting threads are a metric dimension. Apparently an Auto-Ordnance bushing will work, or else re-tap and install oversize ones if it is ever necessary.

That one looks very little handled or shot - the bluing tended to be thin and fragile on them and they quickly show use. I also thought they were stock with a GI profile ejection port - that one is lowered.

Full Metal Jacket
January 26, 2010, 05:14 AM
my first handgun was a brand new norinco 1911 when it first hit these shores. it was the biggest jamming piece of crap-even after two attempts by gunsmiths to get it to work right.

that's my experience.

REAPER4206969
January 26, 2010, 05:22 AM
Damn you have bad luck.

1911Tuner
January 26, 2010, 07:05 AM
Nice find. Although they're a little rough around the edges, they're made of good steel...except for the stock barrels...and are generally dead reliable.

One thing to watch for. The early ones were a little hit and miss on the specs and barrel fit. Specifically, vertical lug engagement was insufficent, and the barrel being soft...the upper lugs would deform and set back with just a few hundred rounds. The deformation will occur on the front faces of the barrel lugs, and take on a stair-stepped appearance with sharp flanging on the top, front corners.
The only cure is a fitted barrel.

The later ones were much better.

outerlimit
January 26, 2010, 09:54 AM
What is considered an early one and a later one? I have a 1993 model and I really like the chrome lined barrel. It's a nice feature and my bullets have a little more speed than a typical steel barrel. This is the first I've heard of Norc1911 barrels being soft. Are they really soft or is the frame material just so hard that makes this an issue?

Fergy35
January 26, 2010, 10:08 AM
In addition to what is early and what is later - What should getting a fitted barrel cost?

1911Tuner
January 26, 2010, 10:18 AM
Are they really soft or is the frame material just so hard that makes this an issue?

They're soft. That's why they're hard chromed.

In addition to what is early and what is later - What should getting a fitted barrel cost?

The very first ones that came into the country. Thankfully, there weren't many of those that hit the shores before the issue was corrected. Hard-fitting a barrel cost? It varies from one smith to another, and depends on which barrel, and its cost...and how precisely you want it to be fitted. For a competitive Bullseye gun...high. Just to have a well-fitted barrel with attention to detail...not so bad, considering the benefits of enhanced accuracy and long life. Every Norinco I own or have owned was upgraded with a Kart barrel right off the bat, except for the one I've got that's unfired/NIB...and it's being coveted by a SC sheriff's deputy. If he doesn't go for it, I've got a Kart in the shop on standby.

bikerdoc
January 26, 2010, 10:42 AM
You sir reluctantly scored a nice gun.

Rolando
January 26, 2010, 11:40 AM
Thasakeepa!

meef
January 26, 2010, 12:02 PM
I put another 50 through it and it functioned perfectly with 230 ball and the gun shot absolutely dead-on at 25 years.:eek:

That's a really long time to stand there shooting.

NMGonzo
January 26, 2010, 01:09 PM
It's worthless.

Send it to me; I will bear your shame.

HisSoldier
January 26, 2010, 01:48 PM
I've read that the grip bushing holes in the frame are metric, kinda odd. This is the second time I've read that the frames and slides are hard, are they carburized? If they are through hardened too hard they would crack soon I suspect.

outerlimit
January 27, 2010, 12:05 PM
HisSoldier, I have no idea. I just assume it is very high carbon steel. I think somebody once compared the frame and slide to a "railway spike" in hardness. :D I thought it was just the screws that were metric, not the bushings, but maybe it is the bushings, or both.

Of the frame and the slide, I assume one is softer than the other though. Because if not, it may lead to galling.

1911Tuner,
Are there a lot of fitting issues with a new Easy Fit or National Match Kart barrel in the typical Norinco?

They're soft. That's why they're hard chromed.

I always just assumed they were trying to go with military specs, not knowing any better. But I guess that makes sense that they would do that only because of a weak barrel steel. Why else would they spare the extra expense of hard chroming. You have to admit it looks cool though. And I get about 20-25fps more out of my Norinco than my Colt with 230gr..

schmeky
January 27, 2010, 12:41 PM
SaxonPig,

Horrendous, junky guns. I'll give $250.00 cash money for it right now. :cool:

Here's mine:
http://img44.imageshack.us/img44/3069/norincoslide001.jpg

1911Tuner
January 27, 2010, 11:00 PM
1911Tuner,
Are there a lot of fitting issues with a new Easy Fit or National Match Kart barrel in the typical Norinco?

Depends. If the specs of the gun provide good vertical engagement...90% or better...the EZ Fit is the simplest way. If it doesn't...you're lookin' at a full hard fit, and sometimes bringing the rails down to lower the slide relative to the slidestop crosspin centerline. Some of'em can get pretty involved. Others are a cinch.

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