The Slide Lock Lever


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earlthegoat2
February 3, 2010, 06:26 AM
So which is it, a slide lock lever or a slide release?

I say it is a lock lever. I think that pistols in general are not inherently designed to use it as a slide release and I think people are better off if they slingshot it anyway. Some lock levers are downright impossible to "release" the slide with anyway without the use of two thumbs and berserk rage.

I know police academies teach the slingshot method and I believe it was Jeff Cooper who at least sung a little praise for it back in the day. Thunder Ranch teaches that method as well as they say it is wise to slingshot it because it gives you that fraction of an inch more oomph when seconds count and things are dicey.

Once in a while in the gunstore you hear customers complaining that you cannot release the slide with the lever. I even witnesses a store return a Sig 220 for that reason alone. Must have been a heck of a customer. Sigs are easy to release too. I even see people on here talk of 1911s and how it is a pain to have to change your grip on the pistol to release the slide. There is a perfect solution for that, dont release the slide with the slide lock lever.

I tend to think it that people with not much gun experience or training like the idea of being able to release the slide like they see in the movies. They like the sound and the look of doing it.

The main arguement in favor for releasing the slide with the lever is in the far fetched but still possible scenario of your off hand getting injured. Or either hand for that matter. I think this is a valid point but not so much as to learn to release the lever EVERY time and not practice the slingshot method primarily. Do some drills where you have to release the slide with the lever and primarily practice slingshotting.

Kind of a bit of a rant but feel free to criticize. I dont get defensive when I set myself up for flaming.

If you enjoyed reading about "The Slide Lock Lever" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!
usp9
February 3, 2010, 06:27 AM
So which is it, a slide lock lever or a slide release?

Does a door knob open or close the door? Both. It works both ways. It isn't brain surgery. Use it how you prefer.

REAPER4206969
February 3, 2010, 06:28 AM
"Slide stop lever."

REAPER4206969
February 3, 2010, 06:30 AM
It works both ways.
No. It stops the slide; you release it.

earlthegoat2
February 3, 2010, 06:32 AM
There is also a point about fine motor skills going to heck in a high stress environment and manipulating the lever could be trouble. I dont know how true this is. I am not a kinesthesiologist.

earlthegoat2
February 3, 2010, 06:34 AM
slide stop lever

If this is the proper term then I will start using it but I think my use of the term slide lock lever means the same thing in this instance.

I guess I would say the door knob opens the door. The door can be closed without the door knob. Of course if stealth is required then you need to use the door knob to close it.

RippinSVT
February 3, 2010, 06:41 AM
I have always used it as a release during speed-reloads on my Sigs and Beretta 92's. I usually am thumbing the thing as I slam a magazine home. It is the quickest method, by far, for me personally. When I'm just plinking I'll frequently sling-shot it.

nwilliams
February 3, 2010, 07:32 AM
IMO it's a slide lock because it locks the slide open.

The only time I use it as a slide release is when I'm trying to close the slide on an empty mag.

When I chamber a round from an open slide position I reach over the top and a pull back on slide and release. The way Clint Smith demonstrates 2 minutes into this video. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zVGQQhkjzec&feature=PlayList&p=AC7C1E6FAFBFB140&index=17

REAPER4206969
February 3, 2010, 07:55 AM
If this is the proper term then I will start using it but I think my use of the term slide lock lever means the same thing in this instance.
The slide lock lever is what many people call the "takedown lever" on Glock/Walther/SIG/Beretta/Etc. Just sayin'.

John Parker
February 3, 2010, 09:57 AM
There is also a point about fine motor skills going to heck in a high stress environment and manipulating the lever could be trouble. I dont know how true this is. I am not a kinesthesiologist.


Pressing the trigger and hitting the magazine release button are also 'fine motor skills' and no one complains about them...I never really understood why they've made such an issue of this. And before I get flamed for that gem, I've been in a gunfight or three during my deployments.

earlthegoat2
February 3, 2010, 09:57 AM
I was just clarifying with you Reaper, no challenges.

And before I get flamed for that gem, I've been in a gunfight or three during my deployments.

Well this sounds like you have above average experience in what is being conveyed here then and if that is the case I am not surprised you have trained well enough to maintain fine motor skills when boogers hit the fan. The average first time gun purchaser though.....

REAPER4206969
February 3, 2010, 10:02 AM
I was just clarifying with you Reaper, no challenges.
I didn't mean to be a dick about it. :o

hankdatank1362
February 3, 2010, 10:08 AM
The slide lock lever is what many people call the "takedown lever" on Glock/Walther/SIG/Beretta/Etc. Just sayin'.

No, the takedown lever is what is used to field strip the pistol.

http://springer.airsoftretreat.com/articles/beretta_takedown/P1010016.jpg

http://www.corneredcat.com/Images4/s-takedown-lever.jpg

The slide lock lever is more posterior than the takedown lever. Although the slide lock must be engaged on many pistols in order to allow rotation of the takedown lever and field stripping.

REAPER4206969
February 3, 2010, 10:32 AM
The "takedown lever" is what locks the slide assembly onto the frame.

http://www.lonewolfdist.com/Detail.aspx?PROD=416

gwnorth
February 3, 2010, 11:02 AM
This is as nutty as the argument of whether a revolver is a pistol (and vice versa).

The Bushmaster
February 3, 2010, 11:08 AM
Revolver and a pistol are two different items...If you are discussing small arms you have rifles (shoulder arms) and handguns...And it is still a "slide stop"...

REAPER4206969
February 3, 2010, 11:24 AM
This is as nutty as the argument of whether a revolver is a pistol (and vice versa).
A revolver is not a pistol!

gwnorth
February 3, 2010, 11:46 AM
Tell that to all the dead pistoleros of the old west :D As far as I'm concerned any and every handgun is a pistol be it autoloader, revolver, flint lock, whatever ('course, I originally learned to speak English, not 'merican).

Like I say, pedantic internet debates about words and terms with multiple interpretations and meanings is nutty :neener:

REAPER4206969
February 3, 2010, 11:50 AM
Are all long guns rifles to you as well?

hankdatank1362
February 3, 2010, 11:51 AM
Yes, the takedown lever locks the slide assembly to the frame.... As opposed to the slide stop which just holds the action open and prevents the slide from going into battery.

gwnorth
February 3, 2010, 11:52 AM
Are all long guns rifles to you as well?

No, but all rifles and shotguns are long guns (as are, by some definitions, all cannon, naval guns and so forth).

Like I said, you can argue your interpretation of the words all you want, but it does not make you correct in your use of them. Nor does it make me - there are dictionaries and linguists who would argue either of our case, and all would be equally wrong and equally right.

REAPER4206969
February 3, 2010, 11:58 AM
And all pistols and revolvers are handguns...

gwnorth
February 3, 2010, 12:18 PM
But the word pistol originated in the muzzle loader era, long before there were any autoloaders, so by extension of your logic, we have pistols, revolvers, and autoloaders, and they are all distinct (ie. an autoloader cannot be called a pistol, since the meaning of the word was already in use long before the invention of an autoloading handgun).

My primary English reference has always been the Oxford English dictionary, and by that source, a revolver is "A pistol provided with mechanism by which a set of loaded barrels, or (more usually) of cartridge-chambers, is revolved and presented in succession before the hammer, so as to admit of the rapid discharge of several shots without reloading". Just as "automatic" is "Abbreviation of automatic pistol, gun, etc.".

Like I said, one persons interpretation of a word with varied meanings...

REAPER4206969
February 3, 2010, 12:19 PM
Where did I say anything about autoloaders?

gwnorth
February 3, 2010, 12:23 PM
I never said you did, but if a revolver is not a pistol, and an autoloader is not a pistol, just what the heck are you referring to when using the term "pistol" - flint locks, cap and ball, ?

REAPER4206969
February 3, 2010, 12:23 PM
A pistol is defined as a firearm capable of being fired with one hand and possessing one or more barrels with integral firing chambers.

EddieNFL
February 3, 2010, 12:26 PM
Semantics.

I just checked three sites that sell 1911 parts. One used the term Slide Stop and the other two used Slide Releases/Stops. You say tomato...



Pressing the trigger and hitting the magazine release button are also 'fine motor skills' and no one complains about them...I never really understood why they've made such an issue of this.

If there were two ways to release a magazine, someone would start a argument.

gwnorth
February 3, 2010, 12:27 PM
A pistol is defined as a firearm capable of being fired with one hand and possessing one or more barrels with integral firing chambers.

Maybe in your dictionary, but not in mine.

OED - Pistol = " A small firearm designed to be held in one hand".

Like I say, you can argue your interpretations all you want, but it does not make them correct useage, which is exactly why I originally posted that arguing semantics on the internet is just nutty - nobody ever changes their opinions of what a word means to them.

REAPER4206969
February 3, 2010, 12:29 PM
. One used the term Slide Stop and the other two used Slide Releases/Stops. You say tomato...

Does the part stop the slide, or does it release it? Think for yourself.

REAPER4206969
February 3, 2010, 12:30 PM
Maybe in your dictionary, but not in mine.
You're not going to find technical firearms information in the dictionary. Ask the BATFE. What I described is the technical and legal definition of a pistol.

gwnorth
February 3, 2010, 12:35 PM
Oh, well there you go, I was talking about the english language, not some technocrat or legaleze use of it :D

27hand
February 3, 2010, 12:41 PM
I personally have been taught to use it as a slide stop.

Perhaps some clarification on terms (for me) is needed here.

The "slingshot" method of releasing the slide is grasping the rear of the slide between thumb and forefinger. I'm not sure Jeff Cooper ever praised or advocated that method. The deciples of his who teach at Gunsite and who I have taken some training from teach to release the slide by putting the weak hand over the rear of the slide (not covering the ejection port), rotating the gun a bit with the ejection port down and pulling the slide back sharply with that hand essentially hitting your shoulder.
It is the same method used to clear a class 1 malfunction.

Since I haven't taken classes from many of the other schools, can any of you tell me who teaches the slingshot method and perhaps the reasoning for doing so. It seems to me it woiuld be easier for your thumb/forefinger to slip off the rear of the slide than by the method taught to me by the trainers I have had the pleasure to train with.

If you use the slingshot method to release the slide ,do you also use this to clear a malfunction?

Some IPSC shooters I know use the slide release lever :) to save the time of breaking a two handed grip.

Back to the OP question. The reason for using the support hand to pull the slide completely rearward is to allow the full force of the recoil spring to strip a round off the mag and chamber it. My Glock 23 travels about 3/8" further to the rear than using the slide stop lever to release the slide.

EddieNFL
February 3, 2010, 12:42 PM
Does the part stop the slide, or does it release it? Think for yourself.
Well, since I've purchased from the latter two, mine do both. I guess if I had gone with the first it would only stop the slide and I would have a useless firearm.

REAPER4206969
February 3, 2010, 12:48 PM
No, you release the slide, it only stops it.

SideArmed
February 3, 2010, 12:57 PM
No, you release the slide, it only stops it.
but you have to hit the slide stop lever to "release the slide" .....
Get this...you can also push the lever up without a mag in and "stop the slide"

What point are you trying to make and who cares??

REAPER4206969
February 3, 2010, 01:09 PM
What point are you trying to make and who cares??
This is a technical discussion. I'm being technical. Now let me tell you why it's a mag catch, not a "mag release"...

The Bushmaster
February 3, 2010, 01:16 PM
Hell...Ain't this fun?:evil:

Shawn Dodson
February 3, 2010, 01:24 PM
What is its function?

Does it make sense to engage a "release" to lock something?

Does it make sense to disengage a "lock" to release something?

Which one is bass ackwards?

I believe "slide lock" is accurate nomenclature. Without a "slide lock" there'd be no need to release it.

REAPER4206969
February 3, 2010, 01:31 PM
I believe "slide lock" is accurate nomenclature.
We already went over this.

Shawn Dodson
February 3, 2010, 01:32 PM
We already went over this. Good for you!

EddieNFL
February 3, 2010, 01:43 PM
No, you release the slide, it only stops it.
The slide is released by disengaging the slide stop/lock/release, regardless if you thumb it or slingshot the slide.

Personally, I don't care if it's called the "part that slides through the link and holds the slide back on an empty magazine."

REAPER4206969
February 3, 2010, 01:53 PM
"part that slides through the link and holds the slide back on an empty magazine."
But what if it's a modified linkless Browning tilting barrel action?

EddieNFL
February 3, 2010, 02:52 PM
But what if it's a modified linkless Browning tilting barrel action?
Then it's not a 1911 and has no bearing on my life.

armchairQB
February 3, 2010, 03:25 PM
I think this is more an arguement of technique than nomenclature. Do you use the slide lock lever as a slide lock lever or as a slide release.

I use the slingshot method and I tend to think using it as a slide release is pointless. All a matter of personal preference I guess. I tend to see many novice shooters using the release method and the more experienced using the slingshot method.

Are either of them wrong? Not really.

EddieNFL
February 3, 2010, 03:46 PM
I tend to think of the slingshot method as best if you're not willing to train.

I agree, neither is wrong.

Sam1911
February 3, 2010, 03:51 PM
I think this is more an arguement of technique than nomenclature

Yes, it is.

We already went over this.

Yes we did, just two weeks ago:

http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=496349

But the same people have congregated here to argue about it again because, THIS TIME, they're going to change each others' minds!

:rolleyes:

-Sam

EddieNFL
February 3, 2010, 03:54 PM
Well, it works on all those people watching Oprah.

Sam1911
February 3, 2010, 04:04 PM
Well, it works on all those people watching Oprah. Amazing analogy.

[DR.PHIL]Remember, it's always best to slingshot your pistol when you're carrying it cocked and locked on an empty chamber when you're carrying a .380 for protection against bears, 'cause the sound of it racking will make any attacker in a 17-block radius crap his pants and possibly spontaneously combust, and no one like's the smell of buring crap, RIGHT? In other words, you can't make a polka-dot dog out of turtle soup, you understand what I'm saying? THINK about it PEOPLE! It's just NOT that hard! Why any FOOL can see if you want to lay an egg, you've got to tickle a chicken! It's basic FACTS! ... And another thing, you can't carry "Mexican" without breaking some huevos, I mean you have to blow a sprocket to...[/DR.PHIL]

:D

-Sam

EddieNFL
February 3, 2010, 04:09 PM
Amazing analogy.

[DR.PHIL]Remember, it's always best to slingshot your pistol when you're carrying it cocked and locked on an empty chamber when you're carrying a .380 for protection against bears, 'cause the sound of it racking will make any attacker in a 17-block radius crap his pants and possibly spontaneously combust, and no one like's the smell of buring crap, RIGHT? In other words, you can't make a polka-dot dog out of turtle soup, you understand what I'm saying? THINK about it PEOPLE! It's just NOT that hard! Why any FOOL can see if you want to lay an egg, you've got to tickle a chicken! It's basic FACTS! ... And another thing, you can't carry "Mexican" without breaking some huevos, I mean you have to blow a sprocket to...[/DR.PHIL]

:D

-Sam
I've changed my mind...again.

Guillermo
February 3, 2010, 04:13 PM
as I use it to release the slide, I call it a slide release.

now that this is settled, can someone tell me why flammable and inflammable meant the same thing?

twofifty
February 3, 2010, 04:29 PM
Whether it is releasing or locking the slide, these are only secondary functions of the part you guys are arguing about.

It's primary function has to do with being the fixed point from which the toggle link pivots the barrel in and out of battery. imo, this part should be named according to its primary mechanical function:
the link pivot shaft.

If the link pivot shaft's slide locking/releasing function fails, the gun will still run.

But if the link pivot shaft breaks or bends such that the toggle link function is impeded or ceases, the gun will not run.

REAPER4206969
February 3, 2010, 04:33 PM
It's primary function has to do with being the fixed point from which the toggle link pivots the barrel in and out of battery.
Only in a few designs.

twofifty
February 3, 2010, 04:40 PM
Which ones?

REAPER4206969
February 3, 2010, 04:47 PM
1911/P-35 Highpower/CZ-75/some Ruger's/some S&W's/Etc. Most designs the slide stop is independent of the pistols locking mechanism.

twofifty
February 3, 2010, 04:55 PM
Exactly.
You've just named 80% of the semis THR members use.
These all have Link Pivot Shafts.
The rest have Slide Release/Lock Levers.

;)

EddieNFL
February 3, 2010, 05:21 PM
In the interest of semantics, I feel it should be Slide Lock/Release, as it must be locked before it can be released.

REAPER4206969
February 3, 2010, 05:35 PM
It's not a slide lock people!

rcmodel
February 3, 2010, 05:49 PM
Not exactly.

If it operates on the browning design short-recoil system, and it has a metal frame, the slide stop pin also performs the function of unlocking the barrel either through a link, or a barrel cam.

Colt calls it a "slide stop".
Browning calls it a "slide stop".
Ruger calls it a "slide stop".
Star & Astra called it a "slide stop".
S&W calls it a "slide stop & pin assembly".

In each of these guns, the pin attached to the slide stop itself operates to pull the barrel down out of lock-up with the slide.

It has to be removed to dissemble the gun.

Other designs like the P-38, Beretta 92, all SIG's, Glock, etc. use a separate locking block in the frame to unlock the barrel, a separate slide stop, and separate take-down lever.

rc

HisSoldier
February 3, 2010, 05:51 PM
The designer gets to say what it's called, and according to the drawings it's a slide stop, the mag release is a magazine catch (I've always called it a magazine release, but not after today!), a revolver is a revolver, not a pistol.

The first two above are design nomenclature, the last one is convention. As far as I'm concerned you all can call them whatever you want, but when people use conventional nomenclature or design nomenclature they cannot be wrong.

I was watching the news today, a guy in a farm supply store in Illinois shot up a bunch of people with an AR15 assault rifle.

I never knew they ever made one, must be a one off or limited manufacture, or, someone is not using the correct nomenclature. That is convention now, most people do not know that a semi automatic rifle without selective fire capability is not an assault rifle (And also usually using an intermediate size round). But in this case design nomenclature tops convention. In the case of revolver/pistol it's a bit muddled, but I'd never call a revolver a pistol, that's like saying "I neither know nor care what things should be called."

Calling things by their proper name is the difference between someone who knows what they are talking about or not.

But then who made me king of the spoken word? :D

REAPER4206969
February 3, 2010, 06:12 PM
I was watching the news today, a guy in a farm supply store in Illinois shot up a bunch of people with an AR15 assault rifle.

I never knew they ever made one, must be a one off or limited manufacture, or, someone is not using the correct nomenclature. That is convention now, most people do not know that a semi automatic rifle without selective fire capability is not an assault rifle
The M16/M4 is just the US military designation for the Armalite model 15. All M16's are AR-15's. AR-15's are available with three selector options, safe-semi/safe-semi-triburst/safe-semi-fullauto.

http://www.bushmaster.com/catalog_military_MCWA2F14M4.asp

Guillermo
February 3, 2010, 06:21 PM
AR-15's are available with three selector options, safe-semi/safe-semi-triburst/safe-semi-fullauto.


nope, M-16s are

AR-15s are all semi

REAPER4206969
February 3, 2010, 06:23 PM
Do you know what the first M16's said on the magwell?

Guillermo
February 3, 2010, 06:27 PM
if such is true, they later clarified the models.

Besides, just because it says something on the side...

Ever see a Mustang II Cobra?

REAPER4206969
February 3, 2010, 06:29 PM
Saying the M16 is not an AR-15 is like saying the M9 is not a Beretta 92FS.

MachIVshooter
February 3, 2010, 06:30 PM
Revolver and a pistol are two different items...If you are discussing small arms you have rifles (shoulder arms) and handguns

Revolvers most certainly are pistols. So are single shots, pepper boxes, derringers or any other small arm designed to be fired one-handed.

And technically, rifles and shotguns are also "handguns". "Gun" has historically referred to artillery-sized weapons. That is why "small arms" is used to denote firearms intended for one man operation. Differentiating between handguns and long guns within the scope of small arms is a newer twist.

Saying the M16 is not an AR-15 is like saying the M9 is not a Beretta 92FS.

No, it's like saying the 93R is not a 92 FS. And it isn't.

REAPER4206969
February 3, 2010, 06:32 PM
Revolvers most certainly are pistols. No. So are single shots, pepper boxes, derringers Yes......

rcmodel
February 3, 2010, 06:32 PM
The original full-auto Armalite 5.56mm rifle first used by the Air Force and in Army field trials during the Vietnam war was, and is called an AR-15.

http://world.guns.ru/assault/m16.jpg

It was named the M-16 when it was accepted and adopted into the standard naming system of U.S. military issue rifles.
It followed the 7.62mm M-14 and M-15.
The M-15 was a heavy-barrel SAW version of the M-14 that never made it into general use.

Had there not have been one, the M16 would be known as the M15 today.

rc

Guillermo
February 3, 2010, 06:34 PM
Saying the M16 is not an AR-15 is like saying the M9 is not a Beretta 92FS.

not a good comparison as they function the same.

The M-16 is select fire
the AR15 is not

Unless you are asserting that they are all AR-15's but the M-16 is a sub catagory of AR-15.

Since this is silly semantics thread, that is an acceptable arguement.

Were it a "rubber hits the road" thread it would be wrong

REAPER4206969
February 3, 2010, 06:36 PM
The M-16 is select fire
the AR15 is not
Select fire is an AR-15 option.

mljdeckard
February 3, 2010, 06:37 PM
I'm trying to come up with yet one more pointless terminology point to argue over for absolutely no good reason on this planet.

Guillermo
February 3, 2010, 06:38 PM
argueing with RC is a losing proposition so I will revise my position so as not to be on the opposite side as he.

Perhaps at one time what we know as the M-16 was an AR-15 but such is no longer the case. The M-16 is the term used by the manufacturer to refer to the military select fire. AR-15 is the term used by the manufacturer to refer to the semi auto civilian version.

Guillermo
February 3, 2010, 06:39 PM
flammable inflammable...why?

mljdeckard
February 3, 2010, 06:40 PM
The only reason I care at all about the AR/M-16 terminology at all is to prevent the antis from demonizing our ARs. They want everyone to believe that ARs ARE M-16s.

REAPER4206969
February 3, 2010, 06:44 PM
They want everyone to believe that ARs ARE M-16s.
So? You have every right to own a select fire weapon.

EddieNFL
February 3, 2010, 06:45 PM
I'm trying to come up with yet one more pointless terminology point to argue over for absolutely no good reason on this planet.

How could it be a point if it's pointless? Should be good for a few posts.

mljdeckard
February 3, 2010, 06:49 PM
But reaper, most of us DON'T and can't afford one even if we want one. If they convince the general public that our semi ARs are machine guns, they will be more willing to support banning them. (I bothered to type this out, knowing full well you know exactly why they do it and why it's a bad thing.)

REAPER4206969
February 3, 2010, 06:52 PM
If they convince the general public that our semi ARs are machine guns, they will be more willing to support banning them.
Then you should worry about making machine guns more mainstream instead of trying to make ARs seem more "sporting".

twofifty
February 3, 2010, 06:55 PM
The only reason I care at all about the AR/M-16 terminology at all is to prevent the antis from demonizing our ARs. They want everyone to believe that ARs ARE M-16s.
Can you imagine how much fun the antis are having right now laughing at us?

The Lone Haranguer
February 3, 2010, 07:01 PM
I release my locked back slide with the slide stop.

Guillermo
February 3, 2010, 07:01 PM
Then you should worry about making machine guns more mainstream instead of trying to make ARs seem more "sporting".

I like the way Reaper thinks!

:D

REAPER4206969
February 3, 2010, 07:02 PM
Can you imagine how much fun the antis are having right now laughing at us?
The antis are too busy getting their asses handed to them.

USA Gun Owners Buy 14 Million Plus Guns In 2009 – More Than 21 of the Worlds Standing Armies Combined



Washington, DC --(AmmoLand.com)- Data released by the FBI’s National Instant Criminal Background Check System (NICS) for the year reported 14,033,824 NICS Checks for the year of 2009, a 10 percent increase in gun purchases from the 12,709,023 reported in 2008.

So far that is roughly 14,000,000+ guns bought last year!
The total is probably more as many NICS background checks cover the purchase of more than one gun at a time by individuals.

To put it in perspective that is more guns than the combined active armies of the top 21 countries in the world. countries by number of troops

Of the NICS background checks preformed less than and average .005% were denied, showing, overwhelmingly, that law abiding American citizens are the ones buying guns and that criminals are getting their guns elsewhere.

14,033,824,000 billions rounds of Ammo
Assuming each gun buyer bought 1000 rounds of ammo for each purchase, and you and I know that it is way, way more than that, that would be easily 14,033,824,000+ billions rounds of ammo fired by USA gun owners.

What percent of people were killed or injured by this ammo…it is just to infinitesimally small for me to calculate?

Crime At Record Lows
This record year in firearms background checks show that Americans are solidly in-favor of exercising their civil right to Keep and Bear Arms.

In a year were crime has reached an all time record low what is plainly clear is that more guns equal LESS CRIME!



This is an evaluation of overall firearms and ammunition purchases based on low end numbers per Federal NIC instacheck data base Statistics. The numbers presented are only PART of the overall numbers of arms and ammunition that have been sold.

The actual numbers are much higher.

http://www.ammoland.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/01/nics-background-check-2009.jpg

MachIVshooter
February 3, 2010, 07:05 PM
Revolvers most certainly are pistols. No. So are single shots, pepper boxes, derringers Yes.

While I agree with you that we generally make that distinction, I submit that it is not incorrect to refer to a revolver as a pistol, by definition of the word

I'll simply point you here: http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/pistol

earlthegoat2
February 3, 2010, 07:08 PM
As in the case of the other thread 2 weeks ago,

As the original poster of this thread please let it die.

In other words I would appreciate it if it was locked.

mljdeckard
February 3, 2010, 07:13 PM
I just assisted MY STATE in getting a bill to allow machine guns within the state to the floor of the state legislature. I'm playing chess, you can keep playing checkers.

When your friend has a fly on his forehead, try to resist the urge to pick up a hatchet to kill it.

EddieNFL
February 3, 2010, 07:18 PM
While I agree with you that we generally make that distinction, I submit that it is not incorrect to refer to a revolver as a pistol, by definition of the word

Didn't pistoleros carry revolvers?

REAPER4206969
February 3, 2010, 07:18 PM
I just assisted MY STATE in getting a bill to allow machine guns within the state to the floor of the state legislature.
Good job.

Guillermo
February 3, 2010, 07:20 PM
When your friend has a fly on his forehead, try to resist the urge to pick up a hatchet to kill it

depends on the "friend" and his voting record

MachIVshooter
February 3, 2010, 07:25 PM
Eddie-

reread, please. I'm arguing that revolvers ARE pistols. And also that in the classic definition, handguns also encompasses rifles, shotguns, muskets, etc.

REAPER4206969
February 3, 2010, 07:39 PM
handguns also encompasses rifles, shotguns, muskets, etc.
What?

EddieNFL
February 3, 2010, 07:42 PM
Eddie-

reread, please. I'm arguing that revolvers ARE pistols. And also that in the classic definition, handguns also encompasses rifles, shotguns, muskets, etc.
Thought I was agreeing.

earlthegoat2
February 3, 2010, 08:19 PM
How is this even possible.....??

ArfinGreebly
February 3, 2010, 08:54 PM
Well, I dunno about slides, . . .

. . . but this here is the thread lock lever.

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