Some Glock Trivia


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USBP1969
February 4, 2010, 12:55 PM
After Glock won the contract for the Austrian Army in the 1980’s, Gaston and his staff toured the United States. That tour included the Firearms Training Division at the Federal Law Enforcement Center.

They showed up one afternoon with a Glock-17 sample for us to see. Staff members handled it and had two immediate comments. The grip angle was indeed different than they had encountered before and the sights were, in our opinion, terrible. It had a .160” front sight width and a .130” rear sight width.

We lobbied Gaston for a “U.S.” style front and rear sight with a .160” rear sight notch width and a .130” front sight width. They translated our request to him whereupon he answered a firm, “No.”

They then showed us some photos of testing for the Glock grip angle. They had (As I recall – been a while) five tables set up with a Glock-17, ammunition and a range officer at each table. Behind each was a line of about ten soldiers. Down range of each table was a silhouette target which looked to be about 7-10 yards from where a shooter was standing. The procedure was for each soldier to shoot from a table, and then cycle to the next one. The targets were not changed.

After the shooting was completed, the Glock test personnel examined each of the silhouette targets for the number of hits as well as the center of each composite group. The target with the best composite group would determine what the final Glock-17 grip angle would be. The thing that caught my eye was that each soldier was shooting one handed “Bullseye Style.”

One of the permanent staff instructor (name omitted – since he’s still there) somehow obtained a sample Glock-17 for testing and demonstration. For many classes thereafter he would have the class exit the classroom to a graveled area out side. Once there he would inquire if there were any baseball players in the class. Once he had a volunteer he would hand them a baseball bat and tell them to hit whatever he pitched to them. As you might suspect, he pitched the Glock-17 to the batter who would send it into orbit with it landing in the gravel some distance away. (Some times they hit grounders instead, and the G-17 skittered over the gravel.) The unnamed instructor would then have the class follow him to the range where he fired a full magazine with the Glock without a malfunction. Each time he completed the demonstration by saying, “Try THAT with any other handgun.”

Respectfully,
kent

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Sam1911
February 4, 2010, 01:00 PM
Wow. I sure liked that part about getting to bash them with baseball bats. Is there a place where you can still go to get to do that?


Don't really even care to shoot it afterward...





:evil:

-Sam

REAPER4206969
February 4, 2010, 01:32 PM
Good info!

Leafy Cronmer
February 4, 2010, 09:18 PM
Thanks for sharing

Full Metal Jacket
February 4, 2010, 09:23 PM
source proving this ever happened?

USBP1969
February 5, 2010, 02:49 PM
source proving this ever happened?

Guess you are going to have to define what "this" is.

Sam1911
February 5, 2010, 03:04 PM
Guess you are going to have to define what "this" is.

I think he meant this part:

After Glock won the contract for the Austrian Army in the 1980’s, Gaston and his staff toured the United States. That tour included the Firearms Training Division at the Federal Law Enforcement Center.

They showed up one afternoon with a Glock-17 sample for us to see. Staff members handled it and had two immediate comments. The grip angle was indeed different than they had encountered before and the sights were, in our opinion, terrible. It had a .160” front sight width and a .130” rear sight width.

We lobbied Gaston for a “U.S.” style front and rear sight with a .160” rear sight notch width and a .130” front sight width. They translated our request to him whereupon he answered a firm, “No.”

They then showed us some photos of testing for the Glock grip angle. They had (As I recall – been a while) five tables set up with a Glock-17, ammunition and a range officer at each table. Behind each was a line of about ten soldiers. Down range of each table was a silhouette target which looked to be about 7-10 yards from where a shooter was standing. The procedure was for each soldier to shoot from a table, and then cycle to the next one. The targets were not changed.

After the shooting was completed, the Glock test personnel examined each of the silhouette targets for the number of hits as well as the center of each composite group. The target with the best composite group would determine what the final Glock-17 grip angle would be. The thing that caught my eye was that each soldier was shooting one handed “Bullseye Style.”

One of the permanent staff instructor (name omitted – since he’s still there) somehow obtained a sample Glock-17 for testing and demonstration. For many classes thereafter he would have the class exit the classroom to a graveled area out side. Once there he would inquire if there were any baseball players in the class. Once he had a volunteer he would hand them a baseball bat and tell them to hit whatever he pitched to them. As you might suspect, he pitched the Glock-17 to the batter who would send it into orbit with it landing in the gravel some distance away. (Some times they hit grounders instead, and the G-17 skittered over the gravel.) The unnamed instructor would then have the class follow him to the range where he fired a full magazine with the Glock without a malfunction. Each time he completed the demonstration by saying, “Try THAT with any other handgun.”

-Sam

Silvanus
February 5, 2010, 03:23 PM
Interesting story. Thanks for sharing it.

IMO it's kinda rude to question the truthfulness of another person's story. Do you do that in the "real" life too? Somebody tells you about something he's seen or experienced and you ask for sources or it didn't happen? :rolleyes:

highorder
February 5, 2010, 03:25 PM
IMO it's kinda rude to question the truthfulness of another person's story. Do you do that in the "real" life too? Somebody tells you about something he's seen or experienced and you ask for sources or it didn't happen?

Asking for a citation for information put forward as fact is not insulting, merely diligence.

REAPER4206969
February 5, 2010, 03:31 PM
Glock did all sorts of crazy stuff in the 80's when they were pimping their pistol to LE.

ClickClickD'oh
February 5, 2010, 03:36 PM
We lobbied Gaston for a “U.S.” style front and rear sight with a .160” rear sight notch width and a .130” front sight width. They translated our request to him whereupon he answered a firm, “No.”


...and the first thing anyone does after purchasing a Glock is change out the factory sights.:rolleyes:

jmr40
February 5, 2010, 05:18 PM
A lot is said about the Glock not having a natural grip angle. The problem is that most of the people who say that are people who have shot their whole lives with guns having a grip angle very similar to the 1911. Of course it feels different and odd.

Give a group of people who have never shot a handgun before, and have no preconceived notion of which is supposed to be better, a Glock and a 1911. Let them shoot and ask them which points more naturally.

Not taking sides, I have and love both 1911's and Glocks. Just wonder what the results would be.

MachIVshooter
February 5, 2010, 05:26 PM
Give a group of people who have never shot a handgun before, and have no preconceived notion of which is supposed to be better, a Glock and a 1911. Let them shoot and ask them which points more naturally.

Many, many people come into the shop I help at asking about Glocks because that's what a friend/neighbor/family member, etc. recommended. Most of those people end up leaving with something entirely different. We move alot more XD's, M&P's and Jericho's than Glocks. Not because we push them harder, but because they feel better to most people.

Full Metal Jacket
February 5, 2010, 05:50 PM
IMO it's kinda rude to question the truthfulness of another person's story. Do you do that in the "real" life too? Somebody tells you about something he's seen or experienced and you ask for sources or it didn't happen?

luckily your humble opinion matters not to me. :D

are you one of those people that blindly believes everything you read online? do you believe everything you hear in real life too?

if so, i've got some beach front property in Utah for sale...


i never questioned the poster's honesty. i simply asked for proof of the validity of the article he posted. chillout, dude.

Balrog
February 5, 2010, 07:41 PM
Why would you hit a gun with a baseball bat?

USBP1969
February 5, 2010, 08:24 PM
Thanks Silvanus.

kent

REAPER4206969
February 5, 2010, 08:25 PM
Why not? Someone has to find out what it can handle...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bj5Kcs4dzro

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ygcfp40RTKs

w_houle
February 5, 2010, 08:54 PM
IMO it's kinda rude to question the truthfulness of another person's story. Do you do that in the "real" life too? Somebody tells you about something he's seen or experienced and you ask for sources or it didn't happen?
I tend to be more up front about my feelings in real life (http://myblahg.com/wp-content/uploads/2006/10/absolut.jpg)

Enachos
February 5, 2010, 09:08 PM
That's some interesting stuff. Very believalbe IMO

jmr40
February 5, 2010, 09:10 PM
Many, many people come into the shop I help at asking about Glocks because that's what a friend/neighbor/family member, etc. recommended. Most of those people end up leaving with something entirely different. We move alot more XD's, M&P's and Jericho's than Glocks. Not because we push them harder, but because they feel better to most people.
__________________


Yea, but did they get to shoot them first. I've used both enough that I don't have any trouble going back and forth. All of the others feel better in my hand just holding them, but when I start pulling the trigger bullets hit where I want them to go. Took me a long time to get used to the Glocks different grip angle, but after actually using it I've come to appreciate it.

nalioth
February 5, 2010, 09:13 PM
i never questioned the poster's honesty. i simply asked for proof of the validity of the article he posted. chillout, dude. Article?

According to contextual clues, the OP was there when it happened.

JImbothefiveth
February 5, 2010, 09:18 PM
They showed up one afternoon with a Glock-17 sample for us to see. Staff members handled it and had two immediate comments. And one of them was a 1911 fan catchphrase. :neener:

danez71
February 5, 2010, 09:48 PM
Asking for a citation for information put forward as fact is not insulting, merely diligence.

Article?

According to contextual clues, the OP was there when it happened.

Well said I... I hope you dont mind me palagerizing you.

Interesting story. Thanks for sharing it.

IMO it's kinda rude to question the truthfulness of another person's story. Do you do that in the "real" life too? Somebody tells you about something he's seen or experienced and you ask for sources or it didn't happen? :rolleyes:

But its the internet.... not "real" life. :rolleyes:

Honestly, its hard to believe but not because you wrote it on the internet... just because Ive never "heard" it before and I would have thought it was true I would have "heard" it before.

But since I realize I dont know eveything / havent heard everything.... I take it at face value; interesting but not confirmed.

It would have been cool to be there.

Yarddog
February 5, 2010, 09:51 PM
Give me a swing with a 28-30oz Bomb bat & it will be in a few diferent parts :-)
Y/D

Full Metal Jacket
February 5, 2010, 10:11 PM
Article?

According to contextual clues, the OP was there when it happened.

either way, i would need some sort of proof to believe it. no offense to the OP, but this is the internet after all....

Full Metal Jacket
February 5, 2010, 10:18 PM
I take it at face value; interesting but not confirmed.

well put, danez :)

USBP1969
February 5, 2010, 10:32 PM
Thanks again Silvanus, I couldn't have said it better.

kent

Full Metal Jacket
February 5, 2010, 10:46 PM
^^^sure you don't want to thank Sylvanus a third or fourth time? :scrutiny:

MachIVshooter
February 6, 2010, 01:51 PM
Yea, but did they get to shoot them first. I've used both enough that I don't have any trouble going back and forth. All of the others feel better in my hand just holding them, but when I start pulling the trigger bullets hit where I want them to go. Took me a long time to get used to the Glocks different grip angle, but after actually using it I've come to appreciate it.

Nope, and they didn't get to try the others, either. The Glock actually held the upper hand initially, as it was the only one they knew of. Our only suggestion to them is that they hold and manipulate a few different models and find the one that feels best.

The gun that feels most natural in one's hand is likely the one that will shoot the best for that person. Not 100% true, but if you don't have dozens of rentals and a range for people to actually try them out, it's the best doctrine to follow to help your customer. We always recommmend someone try a few on the range first, but not everyone has the time, resources and inclination to do so before purchasing.

Dave Williams
February 6, 2010, 10:40 PM
I have heard some pretty good Glock stories. The best involved a 1st Gen G17, no cleaning(just lubrication), and 1/2 million rounds.:)

Dave Williams

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