What condition to keep a bedside 1911 in?


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Balrog
February 7, 2010, 02:07 PM
I think 1911s that are being carried should be carried cocked and locked... but what about 1911s that are dedicated bedside guns, but never carried? It would seem like there would almost certainly be time to rack the slide if I heard a bump in the night.

What do people think?

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EddieNFL
February 7, 2010, 02:10 PM
The last one isn't over, yet.

I carry C1 and I sleep C1. Someone will be along shortly to tell you why I shouldn't.

Strahley
February 7, 2010, 02:19 PM
Condition 1

Hell, even if I have my 1911 in my safe unloaded, it sits cocked & locked. That's just how they should be!

JDGray
February 7, 2010, 03:23 PM
I'd keep it in top notch condition:D


Alright, I'd keep it cocked and locked, one in the tube, with a topped off mag.

The Bushmaster
February 7, 2010, 03:26 PM
My 1911 is either on my hip or on the night stand...loaded, cocked and locked...24/7...

okespe04
February 7, 2010, 03:27 PM
cocked and locked un-holstered on night stand.

REAPER4206969
February 7, 2010, 03:28 PM
Either cock it and lock it or swap it out for a ball peen hammer.

Balrog
February 7, 2010, 03:51 PM
Either cock it and lock it or swap it out for a ball peen hammer.

I know you dont really mean that.

Mad Magyar
February 7, 2010, 03:57 PM
It would seem like there would almost certainly be time to rack the slide if I heard a bump in the night.


Under most circumstances, probably so. I kind of like the idea of an ear-shattering sling-shot rack. Give away my position? More concerned letting the BG know that I'm armed....Jeff Cooper remarked about a slide rack in the middle of the night for the same reasons; but in that case was referring to a shot-gun....To each their own....

EddieNFL
February 7, 2010, 04:07 PM
Any reason you couldn't rack the slide with a round already chambered? You end up with eight rounds either way.

REAPER4206969
February 7, 2010, 04:51 PM
I know you dont really mean that.
It doesn't have to be a ball peen hammer...

barneyrw
February 7, 2010, 05:33 PM
When I had young kids I always kept a Colt Combat Commander with loaded mag inserted but no round in the chamber. I also had an alarm system in the house so I knew if someone broke in I would have time to rack the slide.

The Lone Haranguer
February 7, 2010, 06:19 PM
Here is one situation where there is nothing wrong with keeping it chamber empty. Condition One (loaded, cocked and locked) is for situations that have little or no warning. Hopefully, your home is not such a soft target that just anybody can walk up on you while you're sleeping. In that case it would not matter what readiness condition your gun was in. Having an empty chamber also forces you to perform a sequence of tasks to help ensure that you are fully awake before you start handling the gun. If you are a slow waker or even a somnambulist (sleepwalker), it might prevent a AD.

Double Naught Spy
February 7, 2010, 06:30 PM
What does it matter if it is carried or bedside and not carried? In both cases, the gun should be in the most ready state if your goal is self defense.

earlthegoat2
February 7, 2010, 06:43 PM
I dont have a 1911.

I keep a Browning Hi Power C1 at all time though.

Bpacman
February 7, 2010, 06:45 PM
One thing that has not been discussed is your training level. If you train in C1 you should stay in C1. If you switch between C1 and C3 you are going to make a mistake when the situation is critical. Your best safety is always your finger.

Eightball
February 7, 2010, 06:58 PM
I train and carry it C1, so it's what I know & how I use it; when I'm CCWing the 1911, it comes out of the holster and goes on the nightstand, and when I wake up in the morning it comes off of the nightstand and goes into the holster. However, if it's not the "gun of the month" that I CCW, I will either make certain that the chamber's empty (but mag loaded), or completely empty the thing, depending on what seems prudent at the time.

To each their own.

w_houle
February 7, 2010, 07:05 PM
Cocked, locked, and safety on. Really shouldn't matter what gun it is... unless it doesn't have an actual safety (or one on the trigger), but should still be cocked and locked.

BCCL
February 7, 2010, 07:35 PM
C1 always, and as for having time to rack the slide if you need to, all I can relate to folks on that, is what happened to some friends of mine years ago. Guy climbed through a window in their house in the kitchen, and their FIRST clue he was in their home, was when he jumped in bed with them and woke them up......tell me you could grab a gun AND get a slide racked while struggling with an intruder that close.

C1...always!

mljdeckard
February 7, 2010, 07:45 PM
On the closet shelf. Over the shotgun.

rondog
February 7, 2010, 07:56 PM
If you have to ask, a 1911 isn't the right gun for you.

Balrog
February 7, 2010, 08:49 PM
If you have to ask, a 1911 isn't the right gun for you

Why do you say that?

19-3Ben
February 7, 2010, 09:06 PM
One thing that has not been discussed is your training level. If you train in C1 you should stay in C1. If you switch between C1 and C3 you are going to make a mistake when the situation is critical. Your best safety is always your finger.

This is exactly what I was going to say.
The real question is, how do you train? Remember that you may not be 100% with it when you are roused from a deep REM sleep at 2:30AM. You are going to be, effectively, at your worst. This is where training comes in. If you are accustomed to drawing the pistol and sliding the safety off with your thumb, then that is the way the pistol should be set up. Muscle memory is going to be critical here. Do you really want to have RELY on your ability to be startled from a deep sleep and immediately be able to remember whether or not there is a round in the chamber?

I don't own a 1911 yet. All my carry and bedside guns are either DA revolvers or striker-fired guns. That way, all I have to do is point and pull the trigger. That's what my training tells me to do.

So keep your 1911 in whatever condition you are most trained to deploy it effectively. that's my answer.

texas bulldog
February 7, 2010, 09:25 PM
i do use a 1911 as my bedside gun. it is cocked and locked. always.

texas bulldog
February 7, 2010, 09:27 PM
Cocked, locked, and safety on

i'm pretty sure the "locked" in cocked and locked means "safety on".

outlawmay70
February 7, 2010, 11:01 PM
There are times when you "do not" have the time to chamber a round. one example of this is waking up with somebody moving around in your bedroom. This however, is still a time to use caution, as you would not want to accidentally shoot somebody that is not an actual intruder. I only mention this because i leveled down on somebody coming throught my bedroom window once, several years ago. I had relatives visiting at the time. I keep my 1911 chambered, cocked, and on safety. When the shadow was over half way through the window that it had opened (1 foot on the floor & 1 shoulder in the room), I said in a determined voice (because i could see nothing in the hands of the shadow)... one more move and i'll blow your' f---ing head off!! The shadow started to dart back out the window, then froze, and identified itself in an understandably paniced voice. It turned out to be one of my cousins that had snuck out, sneaking back in again. I sure am glad that i gave him the chance to identify himself, and he learned a very valuable lesson that night too. The poor boy dirtied his britches!! But this is what the safety is for on a bedside gun. It's there to give you a chance to think before you pull the trigger.

Zerodefect
February 8, 2010, 12:12 AM
Cocked and locked, but also in it's holster. If its not in the safe, then its in a holster or is a Rifle.

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