RA 64 headstamp (.38 special)


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SteelyNirvana
February 17, 2010, 06:19 PM
Bought a box of locally cast and handloaded .38 specials this afternoon, 250 to be exact. Every piece of brass in this box has a headstamp of RA 64. From what I've been able to find out (Google searching) this is made by Remington and supposedly this is very good brass.

Just wondering if anyone here is familiar with this brass and would like to hear some opinions about it. I can post a pic if need be, all the primers have a red ring around them.

Thanks in advance.

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Walkalong
February 17, 2010, 06:53 PM
I have 400 RA 65 .45 ACP brass, but it is kind of a funny color. Looks more like copper than brass. I have had it for at least 15 years. Don't know anything about the brass either.

bullseye308
February 17, 2010, 07:01 PM
It should be Remington Arms made in 1964. Most likely was used for military loads and if you got it reloaded there should be no crimp to worry about. It is good brass and should do you well for a long time.

Dave B
February 17, 2010, 07:50 PM
I still have a few RA64s. Got them in the late 60s. Military ammo, and they will last for many many loadings. The only problem, they seem to have thick walls, and .358 bullets usually have a slight bulge. Usually not a problem, but sometimes won't fit in a tight chamber.

rcmodel
February 18, 2010, 01:50 PM
Yes, they are thicker then normal for .38 Spl brass, and have less capacity.
Other then that, no problem.
They were originialy loaded with a 130 grain FMJ-RN bullet.

http://ep.yimg.com/ca/I/yhst-24947587498613_2089_2607951

rc

fguffey
February 18, 2010, 02:15 PM
and there was a recall, seems the ammo was reloaded too hot for some 38 Specials, the ammo was loaded close to what is called + P, I still have the boxes with lot numbers, I was shooting a 357 Mag, the recall ammo was not reloaded close to 357.

F. Guffey

Maj Dad
February 18, 2010, 04:21 PM
I have a box of GI 158 gr MC RN by OM in the white box along with several boxes of Win & Rem-Peters lead 148wcs & 158 gr LRN "Super Match." Got them from a friend whose dad was a B-17 driver in WW2 & jets in Korea & VN - he retired from the AF in '73 & was a shooter and had bunches of goodies. His wife kept the pistols (which I've never seen). She's in her late 80's & still drives... :uhoh:

R.W.Dale
February 18, 2010, 04:30 PM
I just love buying bulk fired 38 special brass because of some of the weird and wacky headstamps you get to see. Much more so than any other cartridge.

With the last batch I bought Ive seen S&W, FN, CAVIM, WCC, IMI, RADWAY, MPD and many more

SteelyNirvana
February 18, 2010, 05:29 PM
I just love buying bulk fired 38 special brass because of some of the weird and wacky headstamps you get to see. Much more so than any other cartridge.

I can't help but brag a bit but this wasn't just brass that I bought. They were loaded rounds, made by GUN PRO products (Which by searching I've found out were made by a fellow named Jim Hill in Raleigh, NC). I figure $10 per 250 rnds of 158gr .38 specials was too good to pass up. Actually ended up buying 4 boxes (Other 3 were mixed headstamps), 1000 rnds for $40. A lady I know was selling her deceased husbands ammo and letting it go dirt cheap, apparently he had bought these at a gun show and never got around to firing them.

I am kinda curious what powder he used. I pulled one last night and it measured out to exactly 4.0 grains, small flake powder. When I lit it with a match it burned with a slow yellow bright flame. I do know it wasn't Win231, I have some and the flakes were darker and smaller compared to 231. Anyone care to chime in on what powder it might be?

Maj Dad
February 18, 2010, 07:55 PM
The usual suspects would be Unique/BE/R&G Dot - but lots of other flakes out there... :rolleyes:

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