Once-Fired .223


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momchenr
February 20, 2010, 03:01 PM
I just want to start by saying that this is by far the best source of information that I've found for shooting-related questions. This is the first time I've ever needed to ask a question because most of the questions have been answered already by you guys. If this has already been answered, I apologize.

Snagged 1K of .223 once-fired mixed-headstamp brass for my summer-plinking reloading project in my M4. I've only ever reloaded .223 in small batches, and I've always done it with my own once-fired brass. Usually I reload .308 tack drivers and .45acp plinking ammo.

So I'm inspecting this once-fired brass, and I'm seeing quite a bit of "dings" in the wall of the case. I'm assuming its from hitting the receiver on the way out of a semi-auto, and these marks on only on one side of the case. Otherwise the brass seems to be filthy, but in great shape. These dings don't seem to go very deep. Here's a picture:

http://www.provolveentertainment.com/filebin/dings.jpg

I haven't been reloading long, and I reload for economy more than anything else. Just curious if I need to pitch these, or if they're safe to use as long as I'm only doing starting loads.

BTW - I'm planning on using H322 and a 62fmjbt. Let me know if anyone else has tips on good loads for this combo out of a 1/9" M4.

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243winxb
February 20, 2010, 03:20 PM
One on the left looks OK. I would scrap the right one as it looks deeper and has a crease. But hard to tell from the pic. I did down load pic an blew it up some, but not clear. http://www.6mmbr.com/223Rem.html

momchenr
February 20, 2010, 03:30 PM
yeah, and they're all different... but the rule of thumb, from what I'm gathering is that the ones with creases have to go?

rcmodel
February 20, 2010, 03:32 PM
Size them first and see what they look like then.

Sometimes those small dents pull right out during sizing.

If not, they are still safe to use for full power loads, as long as the dents are midway or further foreword past the stretch point further back.

Dents that would be a safety issue would have to be further back towards the head in the tapered area. A gas leak there would turn your rifle to scrap metal.

rc

momchenr
February 20, 2010, 04:04 PM
got it.

Just to be clear though... dings that are closer to the neck of the case than the headstamp are less of a problem?

I imagine I'd still want to err on the side of caution when pitching the losers.

243winxb
February 20, 2010, 04:14 PM
Yes, Dings that are closer to the neck of the case are less of a problem, like the ones in your photo. Do as RC said, size them, see how they look. Even if they would rupture, the gas would still be contained. You can see some photos here , where the heads have come apart. http://www.photobucket.com/joe1944usa

Randy1911
February 20, 2010, 07:41 PM
Is thiw military brass? If so, you will need to remove the primer crimp. There is a lot of threads on hoiw to do this.

momchenr
February 23, 2010, 12:03 AM
yeah, it's mil-brass... but it was already processed to remove the primer crimp so i should be okay. thanks again for all your help, guys.

counterclockwise
February 23, 2010, 12:31 AM
Be cautious of brass that has been "processed to remove the primer crimp". When you find .mil brass with the primer still crimped in, that is a dependable indicator that it is for sure "once fired". What you have could be 2x.......10x fired because you have lost the indicator. Before you go too far, try seating your intended new primers in a few to assure tight primer pockets.

Walkalong
February 23, 2010, 02:29 AM
Looks like normal little dings that won't hurt a thing. Inspect again after sizing, but they will probably be just fine. Pretty small dings.

243winxb
February 23, 2010, 09:42 AM
I'm assuming its from hitting the receiver on the way out of a semi-auto Yes most are, but you can get a nasty ding if the bolt slams into the round because it jammed. On full auto the bolt misses the head of the round , but still strips it from the magazine. This can give a deep crease in the body of the brass. I scrap them.

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