Cosmoline


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abominableSnowman
February 21, 2010, 02:28 AM
is it safe to boil some magazines coated with cosmo in cooking pots and to still use the pots for cooking?

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BADSBSNF81
February 21, 2010, 02:31 AM
Not recommended

THE DARK KNIGHT
February 21, 2010, 02:33 AM
Yeah I would not try it either. Can't be good.

Cosmoline can be removed very well with brake cleaner and/or mineral spirits. I take a tupperware container and give the pieces I want to clean a good bath in mineral spirits and let it sit for a couple hours. Then I come back and blast it with brake cleaner and then wipe clean, it comes right off. Just wear gloves cause damn, that's a lot of nasty chemicals.

CZguy
February 21, 2010, 05:06 AM
The Cold War wasn't that cold.

As I recall Minot North Dakota was. :D

You could find a used stock pot at a Goodwill or Salvation Army store and use it for a dedicated parts cleaner.

Big_E
February 21, 2010, 05:26 AM
I have just used a metal bucket and filled it w/ kerosene or gasoline to remove cosmoline. Let it sit awhile and wipe it down.

Caliper_RWVA
February 21, 2010, 09:46 AM
is it safe to boil some magazines coated with cosmo in cooking pots and to still use the pots for cooking?

Whether it was safe or not, I am sure that my g/f would never use the pot for food again. ;)

Just buy a cheapo pot at Wal Mart. You'll find plenty of other uses for it once you have a "junk" pot around.

Lee Roder
February 21, 2010, 12:42 PM
I'd wash it out first with soap, but then again why even worry about it, just go to good will or a dollar store and get a pot just for boiling parts.

Try Ed's Red. I use it for all my metal cleaning needs. With lanolin, it even leaves a lasting film which helps prevent corrosion of your freshly stripped part. It's cheap, works great and smells good too!

DMK
February 21, 2010, 12:54 PM
I've had good luck with just boiling a pot of water and filling the sink with it, dumping it right over the parts. A little Dawn dish detergent added to the hot water helps. Let it soak a while, then before it cools, drain the sink and spray the parts liberally with hot water to rinse everything off. Don't let anything cool or it will solidify that grease again.

If you are going to refinish the parts and want to keep them de-greased, then follow up with some mineral spirits and an old toothbrush while the parts are still warm, to get any persistent stuff in the nooks and crannies. If you aren't going to refinish, use Hoppe's #9 instead of mineral spirits. Or use it after a first scrubbing with mineral spirits. I usually finish off with some Break Free CLP applied with a toothbrush, let that soak a few days, then wipe everything down with shop towels and reassemble.

Winston_Smith
February 21, 2010, 12:54 PM
I would do it but I have found one of those "Shark Steamers" to be more effective removing cosmoline.

bluetopper
February 21, 2010, 01:38 PM
Take all precautions necessary, but gasoline dissolves cosmoline in short order.

Ohio Gun Guy
February 21, 2010, 01:53 PM
I find non-chlorine break cleaner works well. It removes everything, so oil it well afterwards.

NOLAEMT
February 21, 2010, 02:00 PM
here:

http://www.theboxotruth.com/docs/edu23.htm

RobMoore
February 21, 2010, 02:03 PM
is it safe to boil some magazines coated with cosmo in cooking pots and to still use the pots for cooking?

To fully answer that question, we need to know if you're married.

19-3Ben
February 21, 2010, 02:35 PM
To fully answer that question, we need to know if you're married.
:D:D:D:D:D:D


This.

Maverick223
February 21, 2010, 02:49 PM
To fully answer that question, we need to know if you're married.


This.+2, this is the right answer. http://forums.nitroexpress.com/images/graemlins/smilies/general/jumping.gif

jpwilly
February 21, 2010, 03:15 PM
Use Mineral Spirits, Hoppes #9 works good too.

azyogi
February 21, 2010, 04:35 PM
quote
I've had good luck with just boiling a pot of water and filling the sink with it, dumping it right over the parts. A little Dawn dish detergent added to the hot water helps. Let it soak a while, then before it cools, drain the sink and spray the parts liberally with hot water to rinse everything off. Don't let anything cool or it will solidify that grease again.

If you are on a septic tank this is not a good idea, it will kill a bunch of the cute littlle anaerobes in your tank and lead to a huge pumping bill. If you're on a sewer line, might even be illegal. :cuss:[This stuff not good for Wastewater plants too] Either way not good. Sewers are only for biowastes, anything else is hard on the system, and could get you fined.:what: Most Public Owned Utilites have pollution detection crews looking for industrial dumping, you may have little chance of being caught, but knowing it's bad for the sewer plant rethink what you flush.

Fat_46
February 21, 2010, 05:19 PM
my "go-to" nasty gunky parts cleaner is a mix of 3/4 odorless mineral spirits and 1/4 Breakfree CLP. I bought a bunch of new paint cans in different sizes and made strainer buckets from other cans, or stainless colanders from Wally world. Just put the gunked up parts in, and let them soak! I use this for the bolts in my ARs as well.

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