Why so few pump rifles


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bushmaster1313
February 23, 2010, 08:27 PM
The pump is so natural.

Why so few pump rifles?

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Dr. Tad Hussein Winslow
February 23, 2010, 08:35 PM
They are indeed natural (inherently) to operate, and particularly if you've used a pump shotgun as many of us have.

The reasons boil down to:

1. Less positive strength and lockup than a similarly-weighted rifle (i.e. turnbolts)
2. Less positive extraction and cycling than a [ditto]
3. IINM, just slightly more weight than a turnbolt, due to the slide-action arms and other components. This is a minor issue though, compared to 1 and 2.

Just slightly less reliable in the field under muddy/dirty conditions, and you can't hot rod it very much.

I like pumps of all kinds though.

jbkebert
February 23, 2010, 08:42 PM
I sold a 760 gamemaster in .270 win and kinda wished I would have kept it. It was a fun gun to shoot the trigger was horrible but none the less fun. My favorite .22s are my model 62a's nothing wrong with a pump action rifle.

bushmaster1313
February 23, 2010, 08:44 PM
The M1 in all its iterations seems to do just fine without the turnbolt!

Abel
February 23, 2010, 08:55 PM
There must be alot of them somewhere because gunbroker is full of 760's & 7600's. I have recently placed certain configs of the 760 on my shortlist. I especially love the older ones with the big lines cut into the stock for checkering. And dont even get me started on the Model 141. It was the forebearer to the 760. Can you say SWEET?

http://www.icollector.com/images/1200/15021/15021_0705_2_lg.jpg

http://www.myhostedpics.com/images/35Rem/rem141.jpg

Almond27
February 23, 2010, 09:02 PM
The M1 in all its iterations seems to do just fine without the turnbolt!What the heck does the M1 have to do with pump action rifles?? I love the M1 personally but it has nothing nada to do with pump actions.

peptoe
February 23, 2010, 09:19 PM
I've never liked the feel of the Remington pump rifles all that much, they feel to long IMO. I like the fast handling nature of them, but I'd prefer something more compact. I really haven't used the carbines, so they may feel different.

MMCSRET
February 23, 2010, 09:40 PM
I always thought I would like a Savage Model 170 pump gun in 30-30. Always late, one of these days; maybe!!!!!

bushmaster1313
February 23, 2010, 09:42 PM
What the heck does the M1 have to do with pump action rifles?? I love the M1 personally but it has nothing nada to do with pump actions.

M1 operates with a force directed straight back and then straight front, just like a pump. I believe the internals convert the force into a rotary motion, at least they do on a Mini-14

Justin
February 23, 2010, 09:50 PM
Pump-action guns are slower to shoot from the prone position and harder to keep on target shot-to-shot vs. a semi-auto or bolt-action rifle.

Deltaboy
February 23, 2010, 09:53 PM
I have a 760 that is great and I love it.

Abel
February 23, 2010, 09:53 PM
I always thought I would like a Savage Model 170 pump gun in 30-30. Always late, one of these days; maybe!!!!!

What a slick little rifle. I could kill all the deer in five states with that thing!

http://picturearchive.auctionarms.com/1144155549/7354563/278947cdc04edc57680dd5672f8fcda3.jpg

tju1973
February 23, 2010, 10:00 PM
Not sure--except the public dollar doesnt dictate more being made. I passed on a Remington 742 in 30-06 last year, complete with 2 10 round mags-- it was in great condition, but I was leery of what I read about them being dogs with getting them going after not being cared for...

I also missed out in a Remington (?) in .35 Remington a year or so back...It was in a good used condition, but it was still a great shooter, and the guy wanted $120 for it...it lasted all of about an hour after our local shopper paper was put out..

leadcounsel
February 23, 2010, 10:40 PM
My guess is that prone and bench shooting is more challenging with a pump.

bushmaster1313
February 23, 2010, 11:25 PM
My guess is that prone and bench shooting is more challenging with a pump.

I would expect the lever operated rifle to be harder than a pump.

NWCP
February 23, 2010, 11:39 PM
Pump-action guns are slower to shoot from the prone position and harder to keep on target shot-to-shot vs. a semi-auto or bolt-action rifle.

A good point. I still enjoy shooting rimfire pump action rifles my favorite being the Winchester Model 61. A pump also tends not to lend itself well to shooting from the bench. The same woes would apply to a lever action. There's something to be said for hunting small game with a slick .22LR pump. It brings the kid out in me. :D

LaserSpot
February 24, 2010, 12:08 AM
Pump shotguns are popular because they cost less than semi-auto shotguns. This doesn't seem to be the case for rifles; a Remington 750 is around the same price as a 7600.

Does a pump have any advantages? I would pick the semi-auto for hunting because it doesn't have a slide that might rattle when I pick it up. Also, the sound of a semi-auto reloading is masked by the sound of the shot, so it's less likely to spook that deer that might be standing dumb-struck after the first boom.

Casefull
February 24, 2010, 12:29 AM
I think they were made for shotgun hunters in the midwest that were so used to a pump shotgun they felt at home with a similar rifle. I personally do not think they are accurate or reliable with max load rounds. They work but there are a lot better choices unless you just have to pump.

VA27
February 24, 2010, 12:59 AM
The reason there are so few pumps nowadays is that a lot of 'gun scribes', from the late 30's on, extolled the virtues of the bolt action and told everyone who would listen that pumps and levers were weak, low-powered, unreliable, inaccurate and caused children to be born without teeth. And except for a few savvy hunters in New England and some of the western states, most folks believed 'em and voted with their dollars.

The truth is that, for most hunting purposes and ranges, a pump or lever is just as good as a bolt gun and a lot faster on followup shots.

The prone shooting thing doesn't wash, either. It's neither impossible nor particularly difficult, just different. Besides which, other than prairie dogs and woodchucks, how many times do you actually shoot from the prone position?

jpwilly
February 24, 2010, 01:06 AM
For me they just don't have the nice lines of a bolt action rifle and haven't ever appealed to me.

Almond27
February 24, 2010, 01:48 AM
caused children to be born without teeth Man, best laugh I have had all day.

Abel
February 24, 2010, 08:02 AM
The truth is that, for most hunting purposes and ranges, a pump or lever is just as good as a bolt gun and a lot faster on followup shots.

Yep. And the 760/7600 is known far & wide as an accurate rifle. It costs about the same as a 750, but that is more of a poor reflection of the 750 Jam-Master. Look what real auto-shuckers sell for. READ BROWNING BAR.

eastbank
February 24, 2010, 09:01 AM
here is a buck i shot with my rem carbine 7600 in 30-06, he was in thick brush moving and only was in sight for about 3-4 seconds,i missed the first shot as my bullet hit brush,but the second one hit him. i don,t think i would have gotten this buck with a bolt action. and as far as being weak or haveing bad extraction, i shoot 58grs imr 4350 with the 165gr nosler bullet and after haveing shot hundreds of thoses reloads with out a problem at all, with 1-1.5 inch groups at 100yds. i saw one rem pump blown up and it was a high primer that caused it and the shooter was not hurt at all,no gas or pieces in the shooters face,the solid reciever contained all the force. it all comes down to what works well for you. eastbank.

Old Time Hunter
February 24, 2010, 09:55 AM
My Father-in-law has a 760 chambered in .30-06 that he bought way back when, used it for hunting a couple of years then parked it in favor of his Winchester 94. He has never finished a box of shells through it, in over 30 years. He says it is a pain in the a** to carry, doesn't balance well, but is very accurate. Maybe the uncomfortable carry thing is the key as to their lack of prevelance.

ky40601
February 24, 2010, 10:37 AM
Back in 1961, the US Rifle Team won using the Model 760. That attests to their accuracy.

http://i240.photobucket.com/albums/ff159/ky40601/Guns/XXRemingtonModel760ArmyTeam.jpg

I love my Remington pump rifles.

Top - Model 760 .300 SAV, Middle - Model Six .30-06, Bottom - Model 7600 .243
http://i240.photobucket.com/albums/ff159/ky40601/Guns/XaModel760ModelSixModel7600.jpg

Wheeler44
February 24, 2010, 10:52 AM
When I did mining surveys in AK I carried a Remington pump in 30-06...It had the 18" carbine barrel...It was like shooting a Mosin carbine...Ball of fire and a recoil that left no questions...and deafening......But it was light, balanced well, swung great and most of all it was fast with a follow up......Everything I wanted in a carry a lot and shoot a little rifle....

thunder173
February 24, 2010, 10:55 AM
Hmmm,...interesting. Have had a 760 in .308 since the middle 70's. It has never let me down,..carries well,..and is more accurate than me. I am a south paw,..so it works well for me. I have shot it from the prone without issue,..and can usually get an AIMED shot accurately downrange just about as fast as a semi-auto. Have ran some pretty hot ammo through it over the years,...some stuff that has jammed up the semi-auto version a buddy of mine has,...but the pumper shucks them out fine. No spraying or praying option. I have never had much of an issue with the rattle of the pump assembly in the field. Guess I know how to carry it. Like it so much,..I bought a 7165 recently to go along side it. I really don't care for a bolt for woods hunting anyways. Say what ya like,...but I LIKE my trombone shooters. Besides,..the 760's have nothing touching the barrel. That's a plus in my book. Buy whatcha like,..shoot whatcha want I say.

Oic0
February 24, 2010, 11:01 AM
I would guess because they remind people of a shotgun and part of a gun is its aesthetics and feel. When people want a rifle they want it to "feel" like a rifle. I'm not saying its right, that is just how people are.

SwampWolf
February 24, 2010, 02:49 PM
I love my Remington pump rifles.

Top - Model 760 .300 SAV,

I've got one like this from my grandfather, made in the early fifties and chambered in 30-06. The low drop on the comb makes it a better candidate for irons as opposed to a scope. Mine has a Williams FoolProof receiver sight mounted and I've used it over the last several decades for killing whitetails. This rig makes for a well-balanced woods/timber rifle that is very fast on the draw. I also installed sling swivels on it similar to the top photo in Abel's post.

SwampWolf
February 24, 2010, 02:54 PM
Does a pump have any advantages? I would pick the semi-auto for hunting because it doesn't have a slide that might rattle when I pick it up.

Maybe in Michigan what you say makes sense but in Pennsylania (and maybe some other states) it's a moot point.

MachIVshooter
February 24, 2010, 02:59 PM
I only have one centerfire pump, but I love my Remington model 14 .32 Rem.

http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n117/Hunter2506/Remingtonmodel14.jpg

rcmodel
February 24, 2010, 03:09 PM
VA27 said:
The reason there are so few pumps nowadays is that a lot of 'gun scribes', from the late 30's on, extolled the virtues of the bolt actionAnd he gets the cigar for the correct answer!

Believe it or not, the gun buying public buys what the gun scribes tell us to buy.
Somewhere along the line, we were told we needed bolt-action rifles and 1 MOA accuracy to kill a deer at 50-100 yards!

So went the 30-30 lever-guns & .35 Rem pump-action rifles into the history books.
(That probably killed more deer cleanly then all the modern bolt-action rifles combined.)

Right now we are being told we need at least a .300 Mag with 1/2" MOA accuracy, a 16x scope with tactical target knobs, and a two pound bi-pod attached to the 13 pound rifle to kill a deer.

Mercy! Where will it all end? :rolleyes:

rc

Old Time Hunter
February 24, 2010, 03:23 PM
So went the 30-30 lever-guns & .35 Rem pump-action rifles into the history books.


Around where I hunt, .30-30 leverguns out number the bolts about 10-1 and the semi's about 20-1, same as the one pump gun (my Father-in-laws). Last November our gun rack outside the cabin had 17 .30-30's leverguns, 2 .444 leverguns, 1 .35 Rem levergun, 1 .30-06 760 Pump (nobody used), 2- Remington 700's (.270&.30-06), and one Rem 7400 in .308....only the leverguns got meat that week.

d2wing
February 24, 2010, 03:39 PM
Part of the sales pitch is that they had the same feel as your pump shotgun.
In some ares they are considered the top deer rifle. Quick followup and no problems jamming. Higher powered than a lever action. Browning made a high power lever action but they are light and kick hard. I still have my dads old Remington .35 pump. It's killed a lot of deer. I've never heard of a Remington pump that rattles, but I suppose one could.

CZguy
February 24, 2010, 04:35 PM
Mercy! Where will it all end?

I have no idea where it will end, but last months American Rifleman had a couple of articles trying to convince you that you needed an AR platform rifle to hunt deer with.

TexasPatriot.308
February 24, 2010, 05:24 PM
I for one just dont like one. last one I had was a BB gun.:evil:

Big Bill
February 24, 2010, 05:43 PM
I've never had a pump center fire rifle; and, I don't want one neither!

shaggy430
February 24, 2010, 05:48 PM
I've never had a pump center fire rifle; and, I don't want one neither!

You're missing out then. I've got a 7600 in .270 that is an excellent rifle. MOA accurate with handloads and doesn't rattle at all. A joy to carry.

Sourdough
February 24, 2010, 07:04 PM
I bought my first 760 in the late 50s. I have no idea how many rounds I have shot through it. I have had custom made rifles and exotic rifles and the best group I ever fired was with that 760 in .308. All shots touching at 100 yards with hand loads. Excellent choice for those of us that shoot lefthanded. I also had a rem pump in .35 Whelon (spelling?). Loved shooting it but got too old and tired to hunt so I sold both. The .308 had a Fajin stock. When I put it on consienment at a gun shop the shop owner told me it was a piece of junk. It was obvious he had never hunted with one! They are extemely quick on follow up shots since you do not have to take the rifle from you shoulder or your eye form the sights!
I have been shooting pistols a lot but my hands started shaking so much due to a medication I am now taking (I hope!) that I am giving it up. Just bought a Pedersoli Lighting (pump) in .357 and feel I can shoot it from a bench rest. Got lots of brass, bullets, and primers so I should be in good shape. Wish me luck!
Jim

tju1973
February 24, 2010, 07:55 PM
I have no idea where it will end, but last months American Rifleman had a couple of articles trying to convince you that you needed an AR platform rifle to hunt deer with.
I read that-- and agree with the intent. I looked at a Remington R25 last week in 7mm-08 ( I think), and it felt natural-- and I would have no issues about putting meat on the ground with one. But than again, my '94 works better in N Texas, S. OK for taking deer in the brush for me..

wyohome
February 24, 2010, 08:29 PM
I've got a 7600 in .270 that is an excellent rifle. MOA accurate with handloads and doesn't rattle at all.

I had an old 760 in .308. It took 3 species of deer, elk, pronghorn, moose and black bear before I found out that it was neither accurate nor powerful enough to do that. I found that it didn't have enough Ft Lbs of energy to take a bear larger than 147.5 lbs, nor was it accurate enough to hit a pronghorn at 150 yards. All of this information was gleaned from this very website. I tossed it in the scrap pile before some other potential hunter wasted 35 years doing the impossible.

Birdhunter1
February 24, 2010, 08:51 PM
Ok I don't have a desire to own a pump action centerfire nor have I ever handled one (evidenced by the coming question). Are the magazine of them tube feed like a lever gun? Reason I ask is I know they are chambered in calibers that are loaded with pointy bullet types (30-06, .270) and not all rounded like the common 30-30 factory ammunition.

jmr40
February 24, 2010, 09:00 PM
I've seriously considered one several times. My brother had one for a couple of years so I got a chance to actually use one a bit. If I were going to Alaska and wanted something for bear defense a carbine in 35 Whelen would be my first choice. Faster shooting than the big bore leverguns and in a more effective caliber in my opinion.

I have never been able to justify one for general purpose hunting however. They can be accurate enough, and are the fastest for repeat shots, but have a couple of flaws I just cannot get over. The triggers are mediocre at best, and they are not easily fixed like most bolt rifles.

They are just plain too heavy. There are plenty of bolt rifles that will weigh less with a scope than the Remington 7600 series weigh without a scope. They cost less to boot. While they are really fast for repeat shots that is just not a high priority for me in a hunting rifle. I can get a lighter, better balanced bolt rifle on target faster for the 1st shot. And with practice work the bolt plenty fast.

I think they are great guns and have their place and someday I may get one. But for now there are better choices for where and how I hunt.

Abel
February 24, 2010, 09:09 PM
Are the magazine of them tube feed like a lever gun?

Some are tubes. The Remington 14 & 141, and I think the Savage Model 170. The Remington 760/7600 is magazine fed and can use pointed bullets of any flavor. The Hornady Lever Evolution can be used in the tube feds though.

Col. Plink
February 24, 2010, 09:19 PM
Love my Remy 760 30'06. First full year of manufacture ('52), a real beauty. Like not having to reposition my hands when shooting or lose the sight picture (any more than 30'06 recoil blows it around!).

Seems like an underappreciated configuration: better accuracy than semis, better handling than bolties. 10 round box mags make it look pretty boss, too!

Birdhunter1
February 24, 2010, 09:42 PM
So if you have a tube magazine fed pump action rifle are you looking at load capacity of 1 in the chamber and 1 in the mag or are most of them (say a 30-06 pump rifle) capable of holding 3 or 4 in the mag?

Like I said I never took an interest in pump action rifles therefore don't know much about them.

wyohome
February 24, 2010, 09:45 PM
capable of holding 3 or 4 in the mag?

760 in .308 is 4 in the mag.

Abel
February 24, 2010, 10:05 PM
So if you have a tube magazine fed pump action rifle are you looking at load capacity of 1 in the chamber and 1 in the mag or are most of them (say a 30-06 pump rifle) capable of holding 3 or 4 in the mag?

The tube fed pumps are typically chambered in low-pressure cartridges with the 35 Remington being the biggest. The Remington 14 & 141 had a twisted tube magazine that allowed for pointy bullets. The twisted steel tube forces the cartridges to set up in a way that is not tip-to-primer. But the Savage 170 magazine is set up like a typical tube mag. Detachable box magazines came out with the 760. The 760's bolt lockup & box magazine allowed for high pressure cartridges like the 300 Savage. Regardless of configuration, I think most of these rifles hold four in the mag & one in the chamber

Twisted magazine on the Remington 141:

http://ee.ar15.com/uploadImages/20091218/201839/Uploaded_633967645505166250_File.JPG

NCdrummer
February 24, 2010, 10:16 PM
If Remington's shotgun triggers were not so crummy the 760/7600 would be great rifle! Free-floated barrel, smooth action, nice walnut furniture, accurate. What's not to like? Terrible triggers!!!

Col. Plink
February 24, 2010, 10:28 PM
BTW, would LOVE to get a Remy 760 in .308!! Have seen 'em on GBroker for too much or course, and have not seen one here or had any response on a WTB ad for one here either. Methinks the good ones don't get circulated much!

Birdhunter1
February 24, 2010, 10:31 PM
The Remington 14 & 141 had a twisted tube magazine that allowed for pointy bullets. The twisted steel tube forces the cartridges to set up in a way that is not tip-to-primer. But the Savage 170 magazine is set up like a typical tube mag.

That's the answer I was looking for as I know the lever action manufacturers have taken an approach with calibers to not chamber them in calibers that are often loaded with pointed bullets.

So in that Savage 170 is there any safeguard or have there been any accidents on record of bullet tips setting off a primer they are stacked against under recoil?

Thanks Abel.

wyohome
February 24, 2010, 10:46 PM
BTW, would LOVE to get a Remy 760 in .308!!

The downside of mine is the balance point is cold steel and the slide rattles. Once you learn to work around that they are very reliable handy weapons.

Notice the wear on the forward part of the receiver, very cold in cooler climates.

http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y156/Deaver/IMGP0808.jpg

bushmaster1313
February 24, 2010, 11:02 PM
Does the bolt tip up in the Remington 760?

VA27
February 24, 2010, 11:04 PM
Rotating bolt in the 760.

wyohome
February 24, 2010, 11:06 PM
Rotating bolt in the 760.

You can kind of see the locking lugs in this pic.

http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y156/Deaver/IMGP0807.jpg

saturno_v
February 24, 2010, 11:56 PM
The Rem 760/7600 is a popular choice in Alaska as hunting/defensive rifle

I love my 7600, very accurate, light and handy.


http://public.blu.livefilestore.com/y1pUtWOusxfzzg1T58w9hhHKQ-GyQx1TvpbXM9d87eULl7cs8ohrgVhdZ06gj8IYZz4dd7GWwr5LyVl7tVzxLAMIw/Remington%207600%2030-06%20(2).jpg

http://public.blu.livefilestore.com/y1p2jH3Bu89JvBNfU-NhH0KF0YUe3xy48D-GFS6T7Hkn8_Raaevau4-z45DY4lD7SKSTHV09SBLPbMl-wVQEYWuyg/Remington%207600%2030-06.jpg

Abel
February 25, 2010, 08:24 AM
So in that Savage 170 is there any safeguard or have there been any accidents on record of bullet tips setting off a primer they are stacked against under recoil?


Yes. This gun is chambered for only the 30-30 round. But hear this: Remington makes pointed 35 Rem. Marlin owners with 336 levers shouldn't use that bullet in their tube mags. It is, and should be, up to the shooter to know what kind of ammo to use in his/her gun.

Col. Plink
February 25, 2010, 02:55 PM
what's the best way to mount sling attachments for the Remi 760? It's all mine lacks...

SwampWolf
February 25, 2010, 03:16 PM
For the butt stock, a standard swivel base stud. For the fore end, Uncle Mike's makes a "fore end bolt base" for the Model 760 (1968 and earlier), part no. 1221-2 (1"); a system that I prefer. However, if your 760 was manufactured after 1968, you will have to use their band type base, part no. 1441-2 (1")-both parts come as a set that includes the rear stud and quick-detachable swivels. WWW.UNCLEMIKES.COM; 1-800-845-2444.

Birdhunter1
February 25, 2010, 03:40 PM
Yes. This gun is chambered for only the 30-30 round. But hear this: Remington makes pointed 35 Rem. Marlin owners with 336 levers shouldn't use that bullet in their tube mags. It is, and should be, up to the shooter to know what kind of ammo to use in his/her gun.

That answers my question on that issue then if that one gun is only chambered in 30-30... and I could see how that caliber in a pump gun could be rather handy as I own a Marlin 336. For what it's worth on the rest of your post I am very familiar with almost all firearms shy of a few styles I am just not fond of therefor don't know much about. Thank you for clarifying and educating me.


Now I want a Savage 170 in 30-30.... THANKS ALOT!!!:(

Abel
February 25, 2010, 06:16 PM
Now I want a Savage 170 in 30-30....

You are not alone in this world. I know a few folks that want'em.

Birdhunter1
February 25, 2010, 06:44 PM
I like 'playing' with the 30-30 and now thinking of my 870's I could see a pump 30-30 being 'fun'.

NJS
March 10, 2010, 02:32 AM
Does the 'heavy weight' of the pump action rifles add to the accuracy in the larger calibers?

SwampWolf
March 10, 2010, 02:08 PM
I rather doubt it. Extra weight, in and of itself, doesn't necessarily equate to better accuracy.

JeffsJeep04
March 10, 2010, 03:39 PM
I've hunted with my 30-06 7600 carbine alone for the last 12 years. My dad got it for me for christmas the first year I could hunt. Only failed to put meat on the table one year (and that includes the year the scope crapped out mid-hunt). I'm finally stepping up to a bolt action gun for the stand, but I'm going to put a williams peep site on the remmy and use it for my stalk gun. It will still get use 50% of the time and I'm sure it's deer slaying years are FAR from over.

My main reason for going with a bolt gun is simple...as stated, the triggers are terrible on these. It's really hard to get a clean shot off at long range. I've done it many times, but it's more work then it should be. Isn't really a lot that can be done for them from what I found, so it's going to be a woods gun. I wouldn't get rid of it for anything though, what a sweet handling rifle!

My dad has used his standard length 7600 since the 70's. He had a peep site on it until I started hunting when he put a scope on it. He's gotten one deer since then. He hates the scope, so I think I'm going to pick him up a peep site for his birthday this year. Hard to beat on that gun, IMHO.

murdoc rose
March 10, 2010, 04:18 PM
I think most people keep their pump rifles, I never seen them floating around. I did see one labeled as shotgun once in a pawn shop.

content
March 10, 2010, 05:24 PM
Hello friends and neighbors /// My Remington 760 .30-06 is still puting down the whitetail.

I think you don't hear much on Pumps because of the Bolt action. It was the next big thing so the manufactures had to hype the bolt up over the pump.

If you are used to shooting an 870 shotgun go get a 760 rifle and you will never miss a lick.

Hangingrock
March 10, 2010, 05:57 PM
In decades past Remington series pump rifles were extremely popular in Pennsylvania. The Winchester M94 and Savage lever carbines/rifles were also popular.

Probably the methods of hunting have changed. There seems to be a lot of tree setters. The bolt rifle has gained in popularity along with telescopic of extremely high magnification.

Buckshooter
March 10, 2010, 06:06 PM
I have a 760 carbine in 308

VA27
March 10, 2010, 10:06 PM
Supposedly Savage made the 170 in 35 Remington. I've never actually seen one, but I'll buy the first one I find.

farmallmta
March 10, 2010, 11:53 PM
How about owning a bolt action shotgun and a pump action rifle? Nothing like being contrarian. :)

Heavenlyfire
March 10, 2010, 11:56 PM
I love my pump 22's. Grant it they are over 100 years old but I love them. They are very accurate and easy to use.

chevyforlife21
March 11, 2010, 12:06 AM
rattle traps, inaccurate.bad balance

Heavenlyfire
March 11, 2010, 12:38 AM
I'll take it!

http://i297.photobucket.com/albums/mm218/SassyDlights/3-7-2010_005.jpg

Forgot to tell ya that it is also a 104 year old rifle.

http://i297.photobucket.com/albums/mm218/SassyDlights/3-6-2010_004.jpg

MetalHead
March 11, 2010, 10:53 AM
I missed a chance at a pump centerfire many years ago, but my little Remington model 12 pump rimfire is one of the few guns where the receiver is not overly long for the round. Kick myself I didn't grab one goin cheap in 22 Rm Special and convert it to shoot 22WinMag. If I could have bought a used Remington of Pederson design in 357mag I wouldn't own the Marlin 94T now.

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