Best way to sanitize gun?


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andrewshogun
February 27, 2010, 12:40 AM
odd question here, but what I'm looking to do is not to clean the gun per se, but sanitize. it is a used gun and i'd like to make sure it is properly sanitized from a bacteria removal perspective. i sure as heck aint gonna throw it in the dish washer, so wanted to see what you guys recommend. thanks!

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kenno
February 27, 2010, 12:50 AM
Buy some cirtus based cleaning concentrate, the clear type without that terrible perfume. Mix some up at about 4-1 ratio in a spray bottle and clean the firearm. Rinse with hot water and dry thoughly. Spray down with WD-40 and dry again, followed by common light oil.

chevyforlife21
February 27, 2010, 01:06 AM
whyyyyy? lol

9mmepiphany
February 27, 2010, 01:06 AM
or just take the thing completely apart and just put it in a tray of 97% alcohol and swish it around for a while, then hit they with carb cleaner to remove all the grease before re-oiling and re assembly

grizcty
February 27, 2010, 01:13 AM
Easy to do here in Alaska.
Just leave it in outside, at below zero temps.

Just out of curiosity, what kind gun?
And, what kind of bacteria? :scrutiny:

bds
February 27, 2010, 01:23 AM
whyyyyy? lol

Maybe to eliminate any biological EVIDENCE? :scrutiny:

If it's a Glock, it will survive the dishwasher cleaning - been done already. :D

Seriously, FYI, 30 minute soak in anti-germicidal solution will sanitize most inanimate objects.

Zundfolge
February 27, 2010, 01:32 AM
I can't imagine that bacteria would survive Hoppes.

I'd stay away from citrus cleaners as those will likely attack the metal ... and for that matter WD40 or anything else not specifically designed for firearms (especially if its blued or nickel).

mptrimshop
February 27, 2010, 01:35 AM
Lysol....eliminates %99.9

VA27
February 27, 2010, 01:48 AM
Pull off the wooden grips, rack 'er up in the dishwasher and run it on the pots 'n' pans cycle with heated drying. Hose 'er down with Ballistol, put the grips back on and call it good.

No, I'm not kidding! A local pawn shop had a fire and about 30 guns wound up with smoke damage. The guy asked me what I'd charge to clean 'em and I told him. All the handguns went through the dishwasher and I cleaned the long guns with 'Scrubbing Bubbles' cleaner. Took me about three hours. No muss, no fuss, no rust. They're guns for goshsakes, not Van Goghs!

Hatterasguy
February 27, 2010, 02:10 AM
What are you trying to get the blood off it or something?

grizcty
February 27, 2010, 02:14 AM
Dish washer?

OOPS,
That's for folks, with running water! LOL

DBR
February 27, 2010, 02:28 AM
Standard "denatured alcohol" available at any paint/hardware store will do the job. After it evaporates just lube the gun because the alc will also remove all of the oils.

Just a side note: most bacteria won't survive long outside a host. Certain viruses like Hepatitis will.

Another option would be 10% bleach solution. Personally, I would go with the alc.

Peter M. Eick
February 27, 2010, 08:23 AM
Dump it in an ultrasonic with something like alcohol or any of the paint thinners etc. Be aware of the fire hazard, but if the ultrasonic does not rip the buggers apart, the solvent will kill them. Finally the ultrasonic will make it come out surgically clean. I am always astounded how clean mine are after I use the ultrasonic on them.

bds
February 27, 2010, 11:39 AM
... i'd like to make sure it is properly sanitized from a bacteria removal perspective. i sure as heck aint gonna throw it in the dish washer
I would go with good sanitizing cleaning. Here's more info if you have more biological/pathogen concerns:

Bacterial spores can survive for years and can survive contact/soak in solvents/germicide solutions and freezing. The dishwasher can be used, without dishwashing soap or chemical drying agents (such as Jet Dry), to heat-sanitize equipment, as well as dry them in the same cycle. The rack in most dishwashers makes it the perfect vessel for this method.

Here's a useful pdf US Centers for Disease Control put out that covers everything from parasites, virus, fungi, bacteria/bacterial spore, and toxin.
Bacterial spores. Some bacteria produces spores. These spores contain all the genetic material of the bacteria. They can survive disinfection, sanitization, cooking, and freezing. And indeed, many of the bacteria that produce spores are present in the ground and survive the freezing and thawing of seasonal changes

http://www.cdc.gov/nceh/vsp/training/videos/transcripts/microworld.pdf

Here's a quick overview of difference between cleaning, sanitizing, sterilizing:

Cleaning - The process of removing visible residue - in other words, dirt - from your equipment. Cleaning agents will not usually kill a significant number of the microorganisms. However, cleaning is an important first step, because without careful cleaning, dirt can provide a place for these microorganisms to hide, making sanitizing almost impossible.

Sanitizing - The process of killing most of the microorganisms on your equipment. Most sanitizing methods used will kill most of the active organisms, but may not kill spores or destroy every individual bacteria. Often, when sanitizing equipment with sanitizing solutions, meaning that any microorganisms that are not on the surface of the equipment, such as those hidden in dirt or residue inside the equipment, will not be affected. This is why it is important to clean thoroughly before you sanitize. Sanitized surfaces still contain some microorganisms.

Sterilizing - The process of killing every living cell in your equipment, including spores. In my opinion, sterilizing is usually not necessary for general shooting/reloading purposes unless your equipment actually come in contact with infectious organisms/spores. Spores are everywhere, especially on ground.

Cards81fan
February 27, 2010, 11:43 AM
My guess is it fell in a toilet. You know, sittin' down or standin' up before or after doing the business, and PLOP!

The gun goes for a swim.

SSN Vet
February 27, 2010, 11:50 AM
attack the metal ... and for that matter WD40 or anything else not specifically designed for firearms

check out Brownell's web site, where they tested all the top gun metal preservatives, from Cosmoline, to CLP to the super-whamodyne aerospace products...

that humble little can of WD-40 gave results that surpassed most (CLP didn't perform well at all) and matched the heavy greese stuff (Cosmoline) as well as the aerospace stuff.

quite surprising to me...

The Bushmaster
February 27, 2010, 12:06 PM
Oh for pete sake. Just clean the gun the normal way. Just like you would when returning from the range...:banghead:

"Sanitize" the gun. Yer kidding aren't ya??:scrutiny:

Cornhusker77
February 27, 2010, 12:34 PM
Wouldn't Hoppes sanitize it?

jonnyc
February 27, 2010, 12:39 PM
I'd still love to hear an answer to the "Why?" question.

W.E.G.
February 27, 2010, 12:41 PM
My Roscoe has that "not-so-fresh feeling."

X-Rap
February 27, 2010, 12:45 PM
This is one of the most odd questions I have read. Has the OP been putting his gun someplace it doesn't belong, trying to clean up some crime, found a gun in a septic tank, or is he just one of those OCD Howard Hughes types who is a clean freak?
All the replies give sound advice, I guess curiosity just demands an answer.

Geno
February 27, 2010, 12:49 PM
odd question here, but what I'm looking to do is not to clean the gun per se, but sanitize. it is a used gun and i'd like to make sure it is properly sanitized from a bacteria removal perspective. i sure as heck aint gonna throw it in the dish washer, so wanted to see what you guys recommend. thanks!

I have ask here and now, why?! This question is plain bizarre.

Geno

Cromlech
February 27, 2010, 12:54 PM
If all you are worried about is bacteria, rather than typical propellant/oil/dirt gunk, then you should only be worried about the exterior, and mores specifically, the parts that come into contact with the users hands - right?

Or did the person you buy it off carry it tucked into their tighty-whiteys?

czrami9
February 27, 2010, 01:00 PM
I would like to think that many mico-organisms would not survive a bath in chlorinated solvents.

But I would vote for isopropanol.

General Geoff
February 27, 2010, 01:04 PM
If you want it absolutely sterile, simply disassemble the gun and put all the parts including frame into a pressure cooker full of water. This essentially duplicates the function of an autoclave.


If the gun has a polymer frame or other parts, be sure to suspend them in the water somehow, don't let them contact the bottom of the cooker or else they may melt.

Runningman
February 27, 2010, 01:43 PM
This is a different thread to say the least. Can't say I ever read a thread about fear of germs phobia on a gun forum before. On the other hand I guess I read about fear of Zombies phobia before.

Be careful about what chemicals you use on high stress parts. Some can do long term damage and weaken the material. Bleach is an extreme no no around staleness steel and titanium and other alloys for example.

Avoid caustic chemicals on high stress parts. Caustic chemicals can sometimes be found in dishwasher soap. Alcohol is usually safe on most metals but it does remove oil. So it will need an oiling after use or rust may be an issue.

230therapy
February 27, 2010, 01:53 PM
This could be a very important question if "zombie stuff" gets on the gun!

Rollis R. Karvellis
February 27, 2010, 04:09 PM
If the gun in question has wood or lamiinit stock's won't some of the backteria still survive in the poures.

bds
February 27, 2010, 04:14 PM
If the gun in question has wood or lamiinit stock's won't some of the backteria still survive in the poures.

They use radiation to sterilize Meals Ready to Eat (MRE) for the military. I guess you can radiate the wood/laminate stock/grip if you have any concerns. :D

cottonmouth
February 27, 2010, 04:23 PM
We had an officer one time that was know to clear out a room when he walked in from his BAD oder! When left I took his issue Glock 22 outside and soaked it down with Lysol, let it soak good for a while and then took the water hose to it, stripped it, dried it and lubed it up.

J.B.

tercel89
February 27, 2010, 05:21 PM
throw it in a pan of kerosene and let it soak for an hour . It will clean it up real good and get rid of crap! I idi it to my SKS and my CZ83 .

Shadow 7D
February 27, 2010, 05:22 PM
Lysol is in a oil or glycerin base?

Alcohol, but it would act as a solvent and strip the oil
Actually acetone and many other solvents kill bacteria, but just plane old water and soap will remove over 99% of the bacteria on your hands according to the CDC, so a plane old good cleaning would seem to be your best bet.

ChefJeff1
February 27, 2010, 06:11 PM
use your hand sanitizer.

KevinR
February 27, 2010, 06:26 PM
Gun Scrubber, Brake cleaner, Carb cleaner

w_houle
February 27, 2010, 06:29 PM
My Roscoe has that "not-so-fresh feeling."
Try Tinactin?

jonnyc
February 27, 2010, 06:38 PM
Or F.D.G.S.

9mmepiphany
February 27, 2010, 07:20 PM
it did occur to me that it might have dropped in a porta-potty

i've attended a class where this happened. the guy came back to the group for ideas of how to get his gun out...we handed him a wire coat hanger

19-3Ben
February 27, 2010, 07:24 PM
Ew. Now I'm goning to go sterilize all the guns I bought used!!! I never thought of someone dunking in a toilet/porta-john. Sick!!!

OK fine I won't. But my wife is a germophobe, so I'm not going to mention it to her, or she really will make me do that!

zhyla
February 27, 2010, 07:45 PM
Eh... couldn't you just put it in the oven at 220 F for 15 minutes (or until crispy)? But rubbing alcohol ought to be sufficient.

grimjaw
February 27, 2010, 07:51 PM
Is the OP trying to remove DNA samples through 'sanitizing' it?

I too am wondering why.

jm

Warhawk83
February 27, 2010, 07:56 PM
Andrew, were you inappropriate with your firearm? Fondling get out of hand?:neener:

jimmyraythomason
February 27, 2010, 08:34 PM
and for that matter WD40 or anything else not specifically designed for firearms (especially if its blued or nickel).
Well that pretty much eliminates everything suggested here. Might ought to get rid of all the worn out tooth brushes,old tee shirt cleaning cloths,brake cleaner, mineral spirits,alcohol. cotton swabs anything not gun specific. This will pretty much leave you with ......nothing.

SleazyRider
February 27, 2010, 09:17 PM
Listerine.

rdb
February 27, 2010, 09:33 PM
Take it to your neighborhood gun shop and trade it for a different one.

Full Metal Jacket
February 27, 2010, 09:49 PM
where's this gun been that it needs sanitizing?

:eek:

Art Eatman
February 27, 2010, 09:57 PM
1. More than aplenty of good answers.

2. Y'know, I really don't think I want to know WHY the question was asked.

3. He ain't been back...

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