Killer Grizzly (GRAPHIC PHOTO"S) Part 1


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grizcty
February 27, 2010, 04:46 PM
Killer Grizzly (GRAPHIC PHOTO"S) Part 1

Not sure, if this is the right section to put this?

A friend, sent these to me last night.

This Grizzly killed five of Chadís dogs, this past Dec in Coldfoot at minus 30.
It ate two, and was laying on top, of the three it had buried.
Chad never carries a gun when he goes to the dog pens, but he had a .38 in his pocket this time.

The grizzly charged, and he killed it.
Hard to believe he could stop a charging grizzly, at close range with a .38 but he did!

The bear was about 25 years old.
But as you can see, he had good body fat, so he was not starving.

F&G took the hide, and it might be at the auction.

Pass this on, to anyone/everyone.
Who does NOT believe in gun ownership, or the 2nd Amendment!
Kinda hard to call 911, when a bear is charging you!.;)

"If we ever forget that we are One Nation Under God, then we will be a Nation gone under."
-- Ronald Reagan

A man WITH a gun is a CITIZEN
A man WITHOUT a gun is a SUBJECT

Take care, be safe.
God Bless.
Chris - Alaska

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cottonmouth
February 27, 2010, 05:04 PM
Wow! He needs to get a bigger gun! But I guess he had all he needed that time. Glad he wasn't found out there with the dogs.

J.B.

jahwarrior
February 27, 2010, 05:11 PM
if i were a religious man, i would say that your friend had the hand of G*D resting on his head that day, to be able to stop a grizzly with a .38....

but i'm not religious, so i'd say your friend was extremely lucky, and needs to go play the Powerball tomorrow.

Onward Allusion
February 27, 2010, 05:19 PM
A .38 , eh? I thought .38's were relegated to target practice - at least that's what the "professionals" say. :rolleyes:

Glad your friend wasn't eaten in the process.

Cosmoline
February 27, 2010, 05:27 PM
The boar was up eating dogs in the middle of winter? At minus 30? That's big news. I would have suspected wolves.

David E
February 27, 2010, 05:47 PM
How many times did he shoot and where did he hit it ?

DFW1911
February 27, 2010, 05:59 PM
.38...many of us thought a Griz could only be stopped with a hand cannon or .338 at the very least.

If this bear was out of his den I'm guessing he didn't put on enough fat before hibernation?

All I can say to your friend is well done. Sound like he kept his head, concentrated on shot placement, and made it happen.

Can you get more details on how many rounds, what type, and where he hit the charging beast?

I've been bluff charged by a Brownie, and for those of you who haven't, I can assure you it is not fun in the least. Three of us had 12 gauges w/ .44 Mags as backups and felt under-armed.

That particular bear was kind of a brat, though, s/he just wanted our fishing spot, which we gladly relinquished :).

H&Hhunter
February 27, 2010, 06:02 PM
Those pictures sure are vague. Why not show a bit more?

How often do bears come out of hibernation @ -30 Deg?

Lone Star
February 27, 2010, 06:29 PM
I read about a gunner on a B-17 whose .50 cal. went dry, so he fired at an attacking ME-109 with a S&W .38. Must have hit the pilot, as the plane went down. Placement is everything!

It always irritates me to read a post like this one, where there is no data on the exact ammo, rounds expended, and placement. Others have also requested this above.

Please ask your friend these questions. Otherwise, we learn relatively little from the encounter,except that some men have a lot of luck.

But it does refute the notion that handguns are useless against a bear.

The teeth on this bruin look worn, and one is broken at the tip. I'd say that it might have taken to stalking men before long, if it ever got the idea.

Lone Star

Cocked & Locked
February 27, 2010, 10:02 PM
December, in Alaska? That puts a different perspective on things. That bear should have been hibernating instead of eating hot dogs.

Confederate
February 27, 2010, 10:25 PM
If one shoots for the nose or the mouth, it's entirely possible to lodge a bullet in the brain or the spinal cord. The problem is penetration. If the bullet is heavy and can get to the vital areas of the brain, or sever the spinal cord, it will do the job. My uncle knows a fellow who hunts grizzlies with a .22LR. He knows where to shoot and always has a backup, though, so he's not entirely crazy.

It's tough losing a dog. Three's even worse. I imagine if the guy had had a 4-inch tactical folder, that he would have gone after the bear with that!

351 WINCHESTER
February 27, 2010, 11:27 PM
Your friend must be one cool shot. At minus 30 I doubt I could hit the broadside of a barn as I'd be shaking so badly.

ShootALot523
February 28, 2010, 12:05 AM
For all you guys who think you need to carry BIG GUNS to do damage, think again. Anyone that thinks carrying a .380 0r .38 is too small, think again. If it could drop a grizzly, it could save your life in a self defense situation. No man is tougher than a full size bear!

joe_security
February 28, 2010, 12:33 AM
I would be willing to bet that Chad is not going anywhere unarmed , anytime soon.

JoeSlomo
February 28, 2010, 12:42 AM
Wow!

I'm glad your friend is O.K..


That particular bear was kind of a brat, though, s/he just wanted our fishing spot, which we gladly relinquished

After a bluff charge from a brown bear, I'd leave too. Besides, after crapping my pants, I wouldn't be able to concentrate on fishing anyway. :)

rdb
February 28, 2010, 01:23 AM
my uncle knows a fellow who hunts grizzlies with a .22lr. He knows where to shoot and always has a backup, though, so he's not entirely crazy.

***? Rotflmfao

Action_Can_Do
February 28, 2010, 02:04 AM
I used to use a 22lr to hunt grizzly until I discovered my fists were better for it.:rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes:

Nematocyst
February 28, 2010, 02:05 AM
Oh, this is sooo interesting ...

H&Hhunter
February 28, 2010, 02:11 AM
[QUOTE]Oh, this is sooo interesting ... [QUOTE]

Yeah my thoughts as well.

Hiaboo
February 28, 2010, 02:44 AM
What's with the chain around the griz's paw.

Cosmoline
February 28, 2010, 03:15 AM
The other photos show the bear being strung up and skinned. It does appear to be up here and during the winter.

Bears do sometimes come out briefly esp if they are having problems. An old boar without enough fat might be such a case, and would be exceptionally dangerous. But it's not typical. I'm hopeful the OP comes back with additional details esp. names.

Onward Allusion
February 28, 2010, 10:25 AM
Amen to that.

ShootALot523 (http://www.thehighroad.org/member.php?u=102923)
For all you guys who think you need to carry BIG GUNS to do damage, think again. Anyone that thinks carrying a .380 0r .38 is too small, think again. If it could drop a grizzly, it could save your life in a self defense situation. No man is tougher than a full size bear!

Marlin 45 carbine
February 28, 2010, 10:37 AM
judgeing by crude testing in stacked wet carboard my .02 is that a hard-cast 158gr rn slug could do the job with good placement - but that's an unlikely or very lucky brain/spine shot. that's one lucky feller IMO.

bg226
February 28, 2010, 10:45 AM
Seems like an unusually lucky hit, with the wrong tool. I always go with the school of thought of "use enough gun."

FoMoGo
February 28, 2010, 12:06 PM
What can work, and what usually works consistently, can be 2 different things.
There have been men killed with a .22 short, and men who have walked away after a hit by a .44 magnum.
Both shot placement and luck have a hand in both instances.
"Personally", I would prefer to have enough gun... place my shot properly, AND be lucky.


Jim

Double Naught Spy
February 28, 2010, 12:12 PM
more photos here...
http://www.gunandgame.com/forums/alaska/96223-killer-grizzly-graphic-photo-s.html

So let me see if I can get this right, reading a bit between the lines. Chad just happened to be carrying a .38 revolver which he never carries when he encountered a grizzly at the dog pens that he subsequently dispatched with the revolver. Not only did he dispatch the bear, but that he was able to draw from his pocket and shoot and kill a charging bear. Apparently unbeknownst to Chad, the grizzly killed 5 of his dogs, eating two and burying three, somewhere in the vicinity of the dog pens as that was where Chad was headed when he encountered the bear. Chad never heard the fight between the dogs and the bear and none of the other dogs were acting crazy because of the presence of the bear (story did not say all of Chad's dogs were killed). The bear turns out to be very old 25 year old bear (about 75-80 in human years), but reportedly had plenty of body fat.

Yeah, I would have to say that the story is suspect. There are just too many extreme and/or fortuitous aspects.

To add to the confusion, bears do not fully hibernate, so it would have been out and about, especially if it had been unable to build up enough body fat. Judging by the poor condition of the teeth (upper incisors worn to gum line, missing teeth, apparently worn flat cheek teeth), the bear could have been in some form of nutritional distress even if the bear was fat. Given that grizzlies lose around 20-40% of their body weight (usually of their fat stores) while hibernating, I am not sure that the bear in the pics had good body fat as claimed to surive several more months of winter.

Note that Treadwell was killed my a similarly stressed older bear and it was a very malnourished older bear that attacked the guide and his dog last fall as well (where the guy also dropped a bear with a revolver).

For all you guys who think you need to carry BIG GUNS to do damage, think again. Anyone that thinks carrying a .380 0r .38 is too small, think again. If it could drop a grizzly, it could save your life in a self defense situation. No man is tougher than a full size bear!

And yet men have taken many more shots from similar and larger calibers and still managed to fight and survive. Just because a small caliber can do a job does not mean that it is the proper or most appropriate caliber for a job. The bear could have been killed with a .22 lr to the brain as well, but I would not even begin to suggest that a .22 is most appropriate for self defense. Here is an article of a guy who killed a 500-600 lb sow with is .22 back in 1906. http://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=41&dat=19060901&id=Cw8IAAAAIBAJ&sjid=qTYDAAAAIBAJ&pg=4459,3788192

Here is a 400 lb black bear killed with a .22
http://www.kait8.com/Global/story.asp?S=3357239&nav=0jshZyGE

322 black bear killed with a .22
http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=232037

The claim is made that the bear was about 25 years old. That would account for the very worn down teeth. It would also make the bear extremely old, about like a 75-80 year old human.

It is rather amazing that "Chad" never carries a gun, but just happened to be carrying a little .38 revolver when he encountered the bear and that the .38 happened to perform quite well.

I am kind of curious how Chad missed out on all the noise that would be associated with a grizzly killed 5 dogs. The dogs must be kept a long way from the house.

61chalk
February 28, 2010, 12:30 PM
Why didn't he hear the dogs you ask? Chad could of been really drunk an sound alseep...His house is a longer distance from the pens an a really sound proof room....but my question is where are the graphic pictures....?.....I thought there was going to be
dog guts an brains everywhere...all I see is a dead bear...?....like the Officer said...."Move along, move along, nothing to see here."

xXxplosive
February 28, 2010, 01:06 PM
Killed a 360# Black Bear in Maine in '72 with a rifle. We skinned it out on boards supported by 50 gal. drums. When we got to the neck area I heard the sound of two things tumble on to the wooden table like dice. The bear had two .38 Cal bullets under the skin that never penetrated through the muscle and fat. Just fell out on to the table together.......

Bullet placement is surely 99%.

H&Hhunter
February 28, 2010, 03:07 PM
I want to know how the bear dug a whole to bury the 5 other dogs when the ground was frozen solid at -30 below. Did he use a jack hammer or a hydraulic rock chisel? Because I happen to know for a fact that a back hoe or even a large track excavator won't break ground in those conditions.

Double Naught Spy
February 28, 2010, 04:20 PM
I thought the same thing and then figured the dead dogs were just buried in the snow.

charliehustle10
February 28, 2010, 04:30 PM
What a bad mofo, I don't care about the bear...who goes outside in -30 degree weather.

Cosmoline
February 28, 2010, 05:50 PM
I assume he means buried in the snow. Snow becomes the ground in the winter, sometimes raising your stomping grounds around the cabin by many feet so instead of stepping up into the cabin you step down into it.

H&Hhunter
February 28, 2010, 06:23 PM
That'd make sense. But I'd sure like for him to answer these questions.

RonBernert
March 1, 2010, 11:30 AM
Not poking holes in anyone's story, but I got this exact story and these exact pictures in an email about 3 weeks ago..... Hmmmm.....

Ronsch
March 1, 2010, 02:51 PM
Hey Cosmoline,

We have had a couple of bear sightings down here...May be hearsay or mistakes, but it has been warmer than normal.

Cosmoline
March 1, 2010, 05:36 PM
Last month was really warm, but this supposedly happened in December at thirty below, which means the bear must have been having some really serious problems. Given the lack of followup information I'm inclined to chalk this one up as another internet myth based on some photos that could have nothing to do with .38's or dogs getting eaten.

LEVRLOVR
March 1, 2010, 05:46 PM
What he said^^^.

xXxplosive
March 1, 2010, 05:47 PM
Try this maybe.............

f4t9r
March 1, 2010, 05:51 PM
GRAPHIC PHOTO"S

As soon as you see that, you know everyone is going to look !!

Gryffydd
March 1, 2010, 06:22 PM
The text sounds like a "FW:FW:FW:RE:FW:CHECK THIS OUT"

"Pass this on, to anyone/everyone." :rolleyes:

Nematocyst
March 1, 2010, 06:59 PM
I've been fence sitting on this - open to the possibility -
but I'm with Cosmo at this point.

Too many questions and no follow up.

GRIZ22
March 1, 2010, 08:36 PM
Hard to believe he could stop a charging grizzly, at close range with a .38 but he did!


Another testimonial to shot placement!

Skeeter Skelton told a story of a friend that moved to Alaska and the only gun he had was a 32-20 S&W. When Skeeter visited him, a year or so after he made the move, his friend had a Grizzly rug in his cabin. Skeeter never claimed the bear was killed with the 32-20 but it was the only gun his friend had.

Gungnir
March 1, 2010, 08:58 PM
With this being in December, the beastie having a reported good layer of fat, and my temperatures not getting above -15F (I'm about 200 or so miles south of Coldfoot so it's virtually Alaska local) from November through mid January. I've heard nothing locally, or on Bush radio, and found nothing else on the intarweb. We also had a hard cold snap just before Thanksgiving where it didn't get above -40 for over a week. So I'm calling BS until the OP comes back with more info.

Add into that the dogs, if they're sled dogs (and why you'd have 5 dogs out here if they're not sled dogs I dunno), you can hear them from a mile away out here, so if they're getting chowed on my a big bad bear, if you're in half a mile you'll know something's up. The guy never carries, but this once, and he's a musher and only carried a .38 :scrutiny: a 22 if a dog gets hurt and needs to be put down, sure, a 44, 45, 454, or rifle/shotgun for self defense, sure, a .38... this story has more holes than my Sunday socks.

If it was in the past few weeks maybe, but I've seen no bear sign out where I'm at, (tracks, scat or smell) and in the past couple of weeks we've had a couple of days (and a night) where it's been above freezing. We do have bears here, I saw several last year, and I'm looking out for them, since we're likely the easiest source of food when they wake up and I'd prefer to have minimal entanglements with the locals :)

Double Naught Spy
March 2, 2010, 09:12 AM
Okay, did a quickie search and found a Chad Conklin in Coldfoot who is one of the town's 14 year-round residents. He is a guide, has a diner, and raises sled dogs.

Apparently old Chad isn't a stranger to news accounts and documentaries because he has been in several for different reasons. Then there was this event in the OP. Now I don't know, maybe old Chad just has all sorts of bizarre and crazy run-ins with old grizzlies, but most folks don't have any.

Gungnir is right. If Chad raised sled dogs, and he does, they would have been making all sorts of racket and there is no way that Chad would have been surprised that there was a bear in the area and laying on top of his kills because the surviving dogs would have been going absolutely nuts.

So in this story newly found old story, Chad has to kill an old grizzly with 2 shots from a .300 Win Mag and 1 shot from a 12 ga that was inside of Chad's closed restaurant. This story is dated Mar 9, 2005 and NOT 2009. Chad wasn't by himself, but had two friends, hence apparently why more than one caliber was used.

http://juneauempire.com/stories/030905/sta_20050309026.shtml
Grizzly is shot after hibernating in diner Restaurant's owner notified by state troopers after bear was seen entering through windowBy TIM MOWRY FAIRBANKS DAILY NEWS-MINER

FAIRBANKS - An old grizzly bear that chose a closed restaurant off the Dalton Highway to hibernate for the winter was shot and killed.
Fairbanks tour operator and restaurant owner Brett Carlson and his companions found the bear sleeping in a dark hallway.

"It was pretty intense," said Chad Conklin, the 30-year-old tour guide who shot the bear twice at close range with a .300-caliber Winchester magnum rifle and once with a 12-gauge shotgun. "It was pretty nerve-racking."

Carlson got a call last Tuesday from Alaska State Trooper Curt Bedingfield in Coldfoot instructing him that someone had spotted a grizzly bear climbing into one of the restaurant's windows.

The restaurant, which is closed in the winter, is located off the Dalton Highway about 150 miles north of Fairbanks. Carlson bought the camp a year and a half ago as part of his tourism business, Northern Alaska Tour Company.

Bedingfield told Carlson he might want to check the situation out. He advised him not to go alone and to be prepared to encounter a hibernating bear. If they found the bear inside, Bedingfield told them to shoot it rather than risk getting cornered by a mad grizzly.
Early the next morning, Carlson rounded up Conklin, one of his tour guides, and Ed Colvin, a cook, and made the 120-mile drive down to the restaurant. They arrived at 8:30 a.m., strapped on snowshoes and tromped the quarter mile to the restaurant. All three men were armed.

They were 100 yards from the restaurant when they spotted the window where the bear had entered the building. The window was ripped off and the snow in front of the window was covered with urine and feces, he said. The office was trashed but there was no sign of the bear.

"That's when we thought, 'It's going to be dark and he's in here,"' said Conklin. "That's when the heart started pumping."

The three men entered the building together and began a room-to-room search for the bear with Conklin in the lead. All three men wore headlamps and Carlson carried a spotlight.

The first thing they noticed was that all the merchandise in the gift shop had been pulled off the shelves. There was a "nest" of T-shirts, sweat shirts and fleece coats built near a door to a back storage area where the bear had obviously been sleeping and the men were expecting it to be around the corner.

"My thought was he was going to be right around corner," said Conklin, the most experienced outdoorsman of the trio. "I had the safety off."

But the bear wasn't there. As they made their way to the kitchen and passed a hallway leading to rooms in the back of the building, Conklin noticed a large mound in the hallway. He told Carlson to shine the light down the hallway.

"All of a sudden you could see the two eyes and I said, 'Whoa, he's down here,"' said Conklin. "He poked his head up and started looking at us."

The bear started to stand up and, with Carlson shining the light on the bear, Conklin fired the first of two shots with the rifle, hitting the bear in the chest. The bear dropped but was still moving so Conklin fired again. He shot the bear in the heart with the shotgun to ensure it was dead.

"Everybody told us to keep shooting it until you know it's dead," Conklin said.

The bear probably did anywhere from $10,000 to $50,000 in damage, depending on what needs to be replaced, Carlson said. The bear ripped out a wall to get into the freezer and tipped over ranges, refrigerators and glass cases.

"He basically demolished the place," said Carlson.

While the bear's hide squared at 7 feet, 3 inches; big but not huge for an Interior grizzly, the skull measured almost 26 inches.

Carlson is planning to have the restaurant open in time for the tourist season. He's hoping clean up much of the mess before things thaw out.

"With all that bear feces and urine in there, it's going to reek if it thaws out first," he said.

Carlson said he probably should have boarded the windows up but the thought of a grizzly bear taking up residence in the restaurant never occurred to him.

http://tristate.localfoodservice.com/apps/forums/index.cfm?FSF_action=view_thread&FSF_UI_tab=forum&FSF_ID=12330
Men kill grizzly shacked up in Dalton Highway restaurant

Owner and two friends stare down their gun barrels at bear bedded in hallway

By TIM MOWRY
Fairbanks Daily News-Miner

Published: March 9th, 2005
Last Modified: March 9th, 2005 at 04:00 AM




FAIRBANKS -- An old grizzly bear that climbed into the window of a closed restaurant on the Dalton Highway to hibernate this winter was shot and killed Wednesday when it was found sleeping in a nest of blankets in a dark hallway.



"It was pretty intense," said Chad Conklin, the 30-year-old tour guide who shot the bear twice at close range with a .300-caliber Winchester Magnum rifle and once with a 12-gauge shotgun. "It was pretty nerve-wracking."

Fairbanks tour operator and restaurant owner Brett Carlson got a call last Tuesday from Alaska State Trooper Curt Bedingfield in Coldfoot telling him someone had seen a grizzly bear climbing into one of the restaurant's windows.

The restaurant, closed in the winter, is located off the Dalton Highway about 150 miles north of Fairbanks. Carlson bought the camp a year and a half ago as part of his business, Northern Alaska Tour Co.

From what I can find, this sorts of run-ins with bears where the bear is killed and F&G is involved usually result in a news story. Successfully defended attacks from grizzlies are newsworthy and do get reported. Heck, just having to kill a grizzly that has broken into your diner will make the news. That someone would have multiple incidents would be newsworthy. So it is my guess that the story that the bear killed the sled dogs and attacked old Chad who then miraculously defended himself with a never carried .38 revolver has seemingly never made the news is BOGUS.

It would appear to be one of those overly amazing internet myths that circulate the internet via email like a virus. Once in a while, the stories are true, but more often than not, they include a bit of truth with a lot of fabrication. That would appear to be the case here. Chad is real. Chad lives in Coldfoot. Chad raises sled dogs. Chad killed a grizzly (with help). The rest is probably fabrication.

Of course, if Chad has had multiple unique run-ins with grizzlies, then I am sure there is another news story about Chad's heroic battle with the grizzly that killed some of Chad's mute sled dogs and somebody will post the story here and everyone will have a good laugh at how wrong I was.

Update, I see where Preacherman posted on this story back in 2005 here on THR...
http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=129228&highlight=chad+coldfoot

H&Hhunter
March 2, 2010, 11:57 AM
Anytime you hear about a ________ you name it big dangerous animal being killed with a ___________________ you name it pet pip squeak caliber you should immediately start to think hmmmm is this for real or just some punk internet commando trying to edify his poor caliber choice?:rolleyes:

Guillermo
March 2, 2010, 01:15 PM
sounds like bear crap to me

Cosmoline
March 2, 2010, 01:40 PM
Good work DNS, I think you've busted this myth.

But just fyi:

From what I can find, this sorts of run-ins with bears where the bear is killed and F&G is involved usually result in a news story. Successfully defended attacks from grizzlies are newsworthy and do get reported.

This isn't always the case. There are a lot more DLP shootings up here of bears than ever make it to the news. A griz found hibernating in a restaurant is big news. A griz you just shoot because it's loitering around your kennels isn't. Most of these don't involve charges or odd circumstances, so they're not really newsworthy. Dozens and dozens are recorded as DLP shootings in the F&G reports every year.

For example, this is a section of the annual report from 2004. There are dozens of GMU's in AK, this is only dealing with a few but look how many DLP's of brown bears are recorded--31 were DLP in region 1 out of 239 kills. Region 1 is just SE:

http://www.wildlife.alaska.gov/pubs/techpubs/federal_aid/survey_inven/brb04perf.pdf

The sheer number of harvest kills of brown bears in Alaska would shock a lot of people from the lower 48 who are used to thinking of them as a rare creature. They're like giant squirrel around here.

captain awesome
March 2, 2010, 02:45 PM
I am with you skeptics,
I like to believe stories, especially the cool ones, but they usually at least have a few holes, as already pointed out. but assuming it is true, I don't care if the man killed it with a pocket knife, that isn't enough for me. if I am up against a grizzly, I want at least a 375h&h with my 500mag as a back up gun, and at least one other armed accomplice and a couple dogs to distract the bear. end of story. The only things to be said here are; Something is better than nothing even if its a .38 and it may just save your life, and good shot placement is better than bad shot placement. If you guys want to walk around by yourself in grizzly country with nothing but a .38, by all means, but I would rather have over kill and error on the side of caution. Don't be stupid. Just because it can do the job, doesn't mean it will. If the story is somehow true, congratulations to Chad. He's One lucky/deadly son of a gun. Bet he'll have that side arm with him all the time and will probably upgrade to a bigger one. I know I would.

in reality this equation would probably apply baring acts of God;
man + .38 + grizzly = dead man + full grizzly + wasted ammunition

Gungnir
March 2, 2010, 04:49 PM
So apparently, the take away is Chad is cursed by being attacked by Grizzlies, but blessed because he'll kill 'em with any caliber. :D

Cosmo's right on the shooting of all Bears for DLP reasons. However given that Chad had allegedly several dogs killed, and the time of year this would have made local news at least. There are normally several each year around here, and in the local town that never make the news. Mind you they're not shot with a 38 maybe that's why. :)

Good digging DNS.

Cosmoline
March 2, 2010, 05:14 PM
It will be interesting to see if this story starts making the chain emails and showing up here again.

Gungnir
March 2, 2010, 09:56 PM
It will be interesting to see if this story starts making the chain emails and showing up here again.
Sure it will, and Chad will become the king of bear slayers, who kills them by reaching down their throats, grabbing their tails and turning them inside out. We Alaskans will continue to propagate this myth to our children during the dark and cold of winter, and Chad will have a sled dog called Bambino who is purple, with sapphire blue eyes, and a sharp wit.
;)

yongxingfreesty
March 3, 2010, 02:21 AM
damn. your friend is a good shot!

grizcty
March 4, 2010, 04:20 AM
Hello folks,

I have been on the road.

Got home checked my emails, groups, and checked THR.
I read all of the comments.
Related to MY original posting, of this article.

I am surprised, humored, & yet, disturbed at some of them.

As you will notice, I said this was sent from a friend.
I posted EXACTLY, what was sent to me.
Minus, the last paragraph.:
Which I added, that stated the following.

"Pass this on, to anyone/everyone.
Who does NOT believe in gun ownership, or the 2nd Amendment!
Kinda hard to call 911, when a bear is charging you!."

I did not "research" this article.
Because, this is a pretty common occurrence, in rural Alaska.
I simply posted it.
If I find any other info, on it.
I will gladly, post it.

I will openly, say this.
It is very obvious, that some members here.
Have absolutely, no clue about bears!
Probably, have never actually SEEN, a live grizzly bear.
Or, know about bear attacks.
I highly recommend, you do some reading on bears.
A good author, is Larry Kaniut.
Who has written numerous books on bear attacks. (Alaska Bear Stories)
Or Scott McMillion book, Mark of the Grizzly

As a long time hunter, LEO, Alaskan, and outdoors man.
And the owner of numerous, 2nd Amendment/hunting groups.
I am known, to be a very straight shooter.
I do not a B.S. folks.

NOTE:
As for the RUDE, private messages.
You know, who you are!
I will be waiting, for your apology. :banghead:

Sam1911
March 4, 2010, 08:51 AM
Well, thanks for the apology grizcty, it takes a big man to come back and admit that he was wrong.

And it's a great object lesson to all of us (as though we needed ANOTHER one!) not to repost the lastest wild'n'crazy story we get forwarded without doing a little fact checking to see if it even makes sense...let alone is TRUE.

You do have to admit it is pretty funny to take a story from "killed an angry grizzly with a .38" in the dark, at 30 below!" to "three men ambushed a sleeping grizzly and managed to kill it with two shots from a .300 Win Mag and a 12 ga. slug."

This got a lot of mileage over in one of the running "which gun for bears!?!?!" threads, as well. (http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=508263) Might want to check in over there to clear up your misunderstanding with those folks, too.

[Edit] And I suppose now we know the difinitive answer on "which gun for BEARS!?!?" A three-barrel "drilling" -- two .300 Win Mag barrels over a 12 ga. barrel! Sweeet! :D

-Sam

Double Naught Spy
March 4, 2010, 08:58 AM
Well, thanks for the apology grizcty, it takes a big man to come back and admit that he was wrong.

Sarcasm? LOL.

I will openly, say this.
It is very obvious, that some members here.
Have absolutely, no clue about bears!

Right, so given your vast knowledge of bears, bear attacks, and all of your reading, I am surprised you didn't look into the background of your email before passing it on here and elsewhere given the bizarre aspects of the story. You didn't pass it on as a fictional story, but as a true event.

NOTE:
As for the RUDE, private messages.
You know, who you are!
I will be waiting, for your apology.
If you are having trouble with members, contact the moderators.

Sam1911
March 4, 2010, 09:08 AM
Sarcasm? LOL. Not exactly. Somebody can come off as huffy and righteous, but if at all possible I'll respond to what they should have said. That leaves them the option of correcting me and showing their rear-end ("I never said 'sorry!' I'm sticking to being an argumentative jerk!") or in taking the hint and running in the direction I lead. ("Uh...yeah. Well, sheesh...guess I've got some egg on my face, but I'm a decent fellow. Just got carried away...").

The point in productive discussion isn't to beat others into submission, it's to reach consensus. Or at least clarity on where we differ. Backing someone into a corner and making them either crawl or fight doesn't further that aim. ("NO! You are WRONG! Admit your LIES and debase yourself before me! Muuuahhahahah!" It's really not as much fun as it sounds.) :)

-Sam

hso
March 4, 2010, 09:12 AM
Shooting a bear too close to the property sounds like a common enough occurrence in rural Alaska I guess, but a bear killing a whole pack of dogs without notice and then hanging around to be shot with a .38 carried in a pocket seems exceptional enough to warrant the scrutiny many applied to it.

Posting gossip that doesn't pass a sniff test, spreading it like a cyber STD via email, and now internet forum, is something that we should all take a lesson from. Critical thinking should be applied to all these sort of exceptional stories while being civil enough to leave the participant the option of admitting their mistake if the story turns out to have mistakes or turns out to be completely mistaken.

61chalk
March 4, 2010, 09:49 AM
Although some members here may not know very much about bears....?...What does the OP think about those members here, who are from Alaska, know about bears...an were very skeptic with the story.....?

John Wayne
March 4, 2010, 12:22 PM
If there is any validity to this story, it seems much more likely that a geriatric old bear was getting gnawed on by several large, young, healthy sled dogs and someone put a .38 in it to finish it off.

Sam1911
March 4, 2010, 12:33 PM
If there is any validity to this story, it seems much more likely that a geriatric old bear was getting gnawed on by several large, young, healthy sled dogs and someone put a .38 in it to finish it off.


Did you read the thread? The true story is explained in detail. The bear was actually in a restaurant, hibernating. No dogs involved. It wasn't killed in the middle of the night by a guy with a .38. It was killed by three guys with a .300 Win. Mag. and 12 ga. slug.

-Sam

John Wayne
March 4, 2010, 12:57 PM
Yes, I read the thread. I guess I wasn't clear in my post--I just had an image of some guy going outside his house to find a half-dead bear with a pile of dogs on it, putting a .38 round in it and saying "look at me, I killed a bear with a .38 special!"

Pointless? Yes. But so was the OP.

H&Hhunter
March 4, 2010, 02:04 PM
As a long time hunter, LEO, Alaskan, and outdoors man.
And the owner of numerous, 2nd Amendment/hunting groups.
I am known, to be a very straight shooter.
I do not a B.S. folks.

Except in this case where you B.S'ed by proxy. Whether you meant to or not you posted a BS story that did not occur even close to the way your post presented it.

I am straight shooter and I'm not afraid to call people out on this kind of stuff. I can take one look at story like that and BS meter goes to full red in about 2.3 seconds. As a fellow LEO you should be able to do the same.

You owe the THR community an apology for passing this off as fact you should know better.

PS

As a former resident of rural AK who has tons of experience with bears I took one look at the way those photos were posted and my immediate thought was "what is he trying to hide to make his story seem true?". You should also go back and read Larry Kaniut's books especially the chapter about "Old Whistler".

You won't get an apology from me. I stand by what I PM'ed you about researching this stuff before you post it here.

Cocked & Locked
March 4, 2010, 02:33 PM
It's all about the right bullet and placement for that bullet, especially when using the .38 special.

My favorite .38 Special cartridge for Griz is a 225 grain Barnes TSX Solid .358 Bullet loaded over a healthy dose of Unique. :scrutiny:

http://pic90.picturetrail.com/VOL2169/3082611/6675271/383706529.jpg

H&Hhunter
March 4, 2010, 07:22 PM
:D:D:D

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