How often do you clean your guns?


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Hatterasguy
March 1, 2010, 11:55 PM
IMHO a lot of wear on weapons is caused by over cleaning. The act of shooting a gun doesn't produce dirt, just carbon which won't hurt anything. Now if your running around in the mud like the army does, disregard this, I'm talking more about range guns that never really get dirty.

This is how I clean my Sig rifle when I'm done at the range, usualy I shoot 200-300 rounds. Wipe the bolt and carrier down with a rag thats been sprayed with CLP, put a few drops on the rails, work action and call it good.

My friend runs a copper bore brush down the barrel of his AR every time he shoots it, but I think that does more harm than good. I only do that on my rifles ever 1k rounds or so. Their simply isn't that much fouling, I don't notice an accuracy change.

So this is my SOP for all my rifles:
1. Every range trip the action gets wiped down and oiled.
2. Every 1k-2k rounds I field strip them, clean everything, and use a brass brush on the barrel and chamber.

What do you guys do?

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mljdeckard
March 2, 2010, 12:00 AM
I very much agree.

bds
March 2, 2010, 12:07 AM
Sorry if you wanted rifling cleaning only. This is for pistol - all pistols get field stripped and chamber/barrel rifling checked before each shooting session. All slide rails and barrel contact points get a drop of Break-free.

When I am shooting lead, I take a mini cleaning kit to the range/shooting (Hoppes #9, bore brush, patch/paper towel, lube) and inspect chamber/rifling around 200-300 rounds and clean/lube as necessary.

When I am shooting jacketed/plated, I found I can shoot 1000-3000 rounds without needing to clean the chamber/barrel rifling in my Glocks.

As to cleaning the entire gun, Glocks get complete strip down cleaning once a year. The rest of the pistols get complete strip down as needed (1-3 times a year).

I find with most polymer pistols, that they only really need chamber/barrel and slide/side rail cleaning.

Also, I found how dirty your gun gets depends on your powder/charge. So far, my W231/HP38 loads have been the cleanest (or least dirtiest) burning.

CajunBass
March 2, 2010, 08:22 AM
I pretty much do as you do. I clean 'em when they need it. I'll field strip them, run a patch through the bore, (almost never a brush), and pretty much just the wipe down the rest. A drop or two of oil here and there.

The ONLY time I have ever stripped a gun down totally is when dealing with com-bloc milsurps to get the cosmoline out.

Sav .250
March 2, 2010, 08:39 AM
This subject seems to get a good going over from time to time but........
Anything I fire gets cleaned! Period, end of statement...........:)

wishin
March 2, 2010, 08:42 AM
After every shooting session. I've yet to wear one out, by shooting or cleaning.

twice barrel
March 2, 2010, 08:49 AM
Unless I'm just too tired or sick; mine get cleaned just as soon as I get home. That's only because our club doesn't really have a good place to set and clean when folks are shooting. Otherwise I'd bring my stuff and clean them before leaving.

TB

RugerBob
March 2, 2010, 09:35 AM
Pertty much agree with whats been said. Also pull some of mine out of storage twice a year for a swabbing and genral wipe down. Some of my rifles and handguns may not see the range but every 3 years or so. During the warm weather I usually hit the range 2-4 times a month. If its been fired, its never over 24 hours before its cleaned.

Sam1911
March 2, 2010, 10:04 AM
I shoot a fair amount of pistol ammo for competition practice. If I cleaned after every range session I'd get little else done!

I usually clean them once a month or so. Probably something between 500 rds in the off season to 750 rds the rest of the year. That works for revolvers, xD, 1911 -- all shooting lead.

Rifles or shotguns get cleaned if they look especially dirty, but mostly because I know they're going back in the safe to sit for a while and I want to make sure they're wiped down for long term storage.

Some surplus and military style rifles get cleaned VERY thoroughly, right away, every time because they eat corrosive ammo.

When I was shooting rifle matches in college, our Anchutzes got cleaned ocne a season, if we were crazy non-traditionalists. The traditionalists didn't clean.

-Sam

Zach S
March 2, 2010, 10:24 AM
5" 1911s: Somewhere between 1500 and 2000 rounds, I'll detail strip and clean, inspect, and replace recoil spring. Sometime around the halfway point (750 - 1000 rounds), I pull the slide off and do a quick wipedown.

3.5/4" 1911s: Detail strip, clean, inspect, new spring between 500 and 750 rounds, wipedown halfway.

Shotgun: I dont recall cleaning it beyond pulling a boresnake through it...

Everything else that isn't a rimfire: every case or time change.

Rimfires: when they quit working. Bores almost never. They only one I pay attention to is my rimfire AR. It has a KKF bbl that has a .223 chamber, and at one point it got so dirty that the chamber adapter got stuck in the bbl... So I take it out every brick, wipe off the adapter, and hit the chamber with a nylon brush.

All the ammo I shoot is new, although when it was cheap and plentiful I shot recent surplus, so I dont worry about corrosive ammo. If they are exposed to sand and mud they get cleaned, and if rained on they get cleaned, mainly to combat rust.

Safe queens get wiped down every now and then to keep the rust away. I use the term safe queens loosely as all of my guns are "rack grade," safe queens are simply the ones I dont shoot often because of lack of interest, time or money.

Blind Bat
March 2, 2010, 11:07 AM
I'm with the majority of you guys. I keep a boresnake in my range bag. After a shooting session I run the boresnake through the barrel a few times. I do a full cleaning around ever 1k round or every 1-2 months but that's mainly for a good oiling. I only shoot CMJs and JHPs so fouling is pretty light. I like knowing that my guns will work in less than ideal conditions.

I think the 'clean after every trip to the range' practice evolved from the use of corrosive ammo. Can you imagine if we washed, waxed and changed the oil in our cars after every trip to the supermarket?

herkyguy
March 2, 2010, 11:18 AM
Every time I shoot, I clean. But I don't go crazy. Shotgun and semi-auto rifle don't get broken down every time. Maybe every 3rd time. Semi-auto pistols get broken down every time. This is partly because I carry and want to ensure everything is functioning correctly after a range session. revolver gets broken down maybe every 6th time, other than that just wiped down the barrel and chambers. one HUGE factor for me is the humidity in florida. I clean partly just to keep everything with a nice coat of oil/lubricant on it to prevent rust.

frankiestoys
March 2, 2010, 12:48 PM
I clean them after every visit to the range, i don't break them down everytime but they all get a good wipe down and a few patches run through the bores. My ss revolvers get the most attention, hate that dam carbon.

Jonah71
March 2, 2010, 01:13 PM
My guess is that all my guns are gonna last longer than I do anyway......so I clean them after every use. They also get reloaded after cleaning. Just a habit that I've had since I was given my first firearm 48 years ago. If I wear them out, so be it. Is it neccessary? I don't know.

OregonJohnny
March 2, 2010, 01:49 PM
I only get to shoot about once a month. So when I go, I go big, and take along at least 10-12 handguns, and shoot through hundreds of rounds with each gun, some with lead reloads. So I get home and clean all guns that got fired within 48 hours or so of shooting. No detailed stripping, just cylinders, bores, slides, magazines, etc.

When I was a teenager, and shooting my Remington 870 3 times/week during the summer, I'd go years, literally years, without cleaning it. It seemed to work better when dirty. ;)

essayons21
March 2, 2010, 01:53 PM
I generally only clean them thoroughly when they are going to be put away for awhile, or if they get really nasty.

After I'm done shooting at the range, I'll squirt some breakfree down the barrel followed by CLP, then a boresnake if I've got it, then wipe the gun down with an oily rag.

My hands are so sweaty, and I live in a humid environment, so if I don't wipe the guns down before putting them away I often find rust forming even the next day.

GunsAreGood
March 2, 2010, 07:04 PM
I breakdown and clean after every range session or coming back from a hunting trip. The only thing I see wrong with this is if you run a brush through the bore to much and pull it back through you will (over time) ruin the crown of your barrel which in turn will ruin accuracy.

Justin
March 2, 2010, 07:05 PM
Every couple thousand rounds, or before a big match, whichever comes first.

Jonah71
March 3, 2010, 11:05 AM
I only get to shoot about once a month. So when I go, I go big, and take along at least 10-12 handguns, and shoot through hundreds of rounds with each gun, some with lead reloads. So I get home and clean all guns that got fired within 48 hours or so of shooting. No detailed stripping, just cylinders, bores, slides, magazines, etc.

When I was a teenager, and shooting my Remington 870 3 times/week during the summer, I'd go years, literally years, without cleaning it. It seemed to work better when dirty. ;)
I don't and in most cases can't do detailed cleaning. Although I get to shoot more often, but probably fewer rounds, I follow the same plan.

Jonah71
March 3, 2010, 11:07 AM
I'm begining to see that it isn't neccessary to be so compulsive about cleaning my shotgun.

boatme99
March 4, 2010, 11:09 AM
I'm lucky. I live out in the hinterland and shoot my pistols a lot.
Usually 200-300 rounds a week per pistol, weather permitting (cold!). I used to clean after every session, now I'll clean them once a month. Still no wire brush needed, just a couple of patches and a wipe down.

rha600
March 4, 2010, 11:14 AM
isn't gun powder corrosive? Or has that changed?

also, carbon build up is a real problem so just because firing the gun doesn't produce dirt doesn't mean the gun isn't dirty or that it ins't going to stop funtioning properly.

As for cleanign the gun wearing it out....I'm pretty fast with a bore brush, but I don't think i'm THAT fast yet. :D

edit: oh, and i clean my guns after every trip to the range. but I'm typically shooting 100+ rounds from whatever gun I took with me. With the exception of my S&W500. If I take something to only shoot a couple rounds from it I won't both but 95% of the time they get a good cleaning after each trip.

Sam1911
March 4, 2010, 11:25 AM
isn't gun powder corrosive? Or has that changed?Corrosive ammo is so because of salts left behind by the compounds in the primers. New production commercial ammo is not corrosive. About half of the eastern bloc stuff you can buy now is corrosive, but most of those commercial manufacturers (e.g.: Wolf) have moved to non-corrosive. Almost all old surplus ammo is corrosive, and the older the more likely it is to be so.

also, carbon build up is a real problem so just because firing the gun doesn't produce dirt doesn't mean the gun isn't dirty or that it ins't going to stop funtioning properly.I think most folks understood that guns dirty from firing are actually carbon fouled, not literally full of dirt. You can eventually stop most any gun from functioning if it sees enough carbon fouling. But the required quantity is usually a lot higher than folks think. I have done this with a few of my handguns (shot without cleaning until failure from gunk) and it takes well over 1,000 rds, in most cases. Even when my 1911 finally stopped returning to battery due to carbon build-up, a quick dousing with CLP (without even disassembling) got it running again. So, how necessary is regular cleaning? Probably not as much as you might think.

Now, I still do it fairly requently, as a sooty gun gets black gunk all over my hands and clothes, and I do like to take the opportunity to check for parts wear and corrosion.

As for cleanign the gun wearing it out....I'm pretty fast with a bore brush, but I don't think i'm THAT fast yet. The established concerns about wearing out a gun by cleaning it aren't from bore brushing the rifling away, but from damaging the muzzle crown and critical last inch of rifling by repeatedly scraping a steel cleaning rod (especially a screw-together, segmented cleaning rod) against it.

It mostly is visible when you guage the muzzles on surplus military rifles (especially Garands) that were cleaned from the muzzle by guys who were taught to do so vigorously, quickly, and religiously. Far more bores were worn out by old steel GI cleaning rods than by too many rounds sent downrange.

-Sam

rha600
March 4, 2010, 11:34 AM
Corrosive ammo is so because of salts left behind by the compounds in the primers. New production commercial ammo is not corrosive. About half of the eastern bloc stuff you can buy now is corrosive, but most of those commercial manufacturers (e.g.: Wolf) have moved to non-corrosive. Almost all old surplus ammo is corrosive, and the older the more likely it is to be so.


got ya.



I think most folks understood that guns dirty from firing are actually carbon fouled, not literally full of dirt. You can eventually stop most any gun from functioning if it sees enough carbon fouling. But the required quantity is usually a lot higher than folks think. I have done this with a few of my handguns (shot without cleaning until failure from gunk) and it takes well over 1,000 rds, in most cases. Even when my 1911 finally stopped returning to battery due to carbon build-up, a quick dousing with CLP (without even disassembling) got it running again. So, how necessary is regular cleaning? Probably not as much as you might think.

I said that about the carbon build up in response to the OP statement below...

"The act of shooting a gun doesn't produce dirt, just carbon which won't hurt anything. "



The established concerns about wearing out a gun by cleaning it aren't from bore brushing the rifling away, but from damaging the muzzle crown and critical last inch of rifling by repeatedly scraping a steel cleaning rod (especially a screw-together, segmented cleaning rod) against it.

It mostly is visible when you guage the muzzles on surplus military rifles (especially Garands) that were cleaned from the muzzle by guys who were taught to do so vigorously, quickly, and religiously. Far more bores were worn out by old steel GI cleaning rods than by too many rounds sent downrange.

-Sam

my cleaning rods (on my pistols) are plastic and with the exception of my S&W22a I clean them from the chamber forward. Most of the time, and 100% of the time on my rifles, I use a boresnake so I'm not worried about damaging the rifling with a clenaing rod. :)

shockwave
March 4, 2010, 11:38 AM
My guess is that all my guns are gonna last longer than I do anyway......so I clean them after every use. They also get reloaded after cleaning.

This is my policy also. Cleaning supplies are cheap and I like my weapons in perfect working order. I find that cleaning them is a very enjoyable activity.

DNS
March 4, 2010, 11:47 AM
I can't stand the though of a dirty gun in my safe. Yep, cleaned after every range session.

Mike

RONSERESURPLUS
March 4, 2010, 11:55 AM
Hello all, RON L here - SERE SURPLUS


I cean my Guns once every few Months weather they have been shot or not! I use a Bore guide as well as Brass or Fiber rods so I'm not wearing the crown or other such wear, I do the cleaning, as also an nspection, to make sure al Is in order? If I fire them and that's not darn near as much as I like, I clean them well and do the same sort of Inspection! I have been doing this the same way since I was 15 and all my guns stay in good working order! Just my thoughts and opinions, but those formed over 40 years of shooting, that should count for something?

RON

Baphomet
March 4, 2010, 11:56 AM
I clean them after every shooting session because I don't see any reason not to. They also represent significant financial investment, and could potentially be called upon at any time to save my bacon.

I'm also quite convinced that should I ever find myself "entertaining" unexpected visitors *cough*, that it will be at a time positively inconvenient. Presenting a crud-laden rosco at such a crucial social moment would, for me at least, be somewhat less than confidence-inspiring if not downright embarrassing. When and if I ever find it socially acceptable to be exchanging high velocity lead, I intend to do so putting my best foot forward.

That's reason enough for me to take ten minutes out of my oh-so-busy schedule to hit my pistolas with a bit of solvent, some patches and a little fresh oil.

SOUTHPAW
March 4, 2010, 12:07 PM
I do a field strip and clean to each of my pistols after every range visit. I do a quick scrub of the barrel with a bore brush but only of there is visable debris. Mostly patch clean with CLP, use q-tips for the tight spots, and a tooth brush for certain parts such as the ramps on autos or the cone on my revolver. There's no way you are going to wear out the gun my using cloth an CLP, so why not keep it clean? Maybe using a brush several hundred thousand times will finally change tolerences but I've never heard of cleaning a gun to death. ;). If you're worried about that just wet patch the hell outta the barrel and you're all set. I also strip and wipe/oil my EDC about 1-2 times a month even if it's unfired to remove all the lint and crap and keep her slick.

All and all, I clean my guns because, like my cars I hate to see them filthy. They are beautiful things and deserve to be clean. :)

ArmedBear
March 4, 2010, 12:18 PM
It depends on the gun, and what I did with it.

Sometimes, I'll clean a gun that hasn't been fired since it was last cleaned, if it's been out hunting with me in bad weather.

If I shoot a few times on a nice day, I'll wipe the outside off with a CLP-moistened patch and put it in the safe, especially if I'm headed back out soon.

A bolt-action centerfire rifle is so easy, I generally clean it if I shoot it. Outers Foaming Bore Cleaner while I eat dinner, then some patches, and it's squeaky-clean.

My .22 semiauto pistol gets cleaned once every pistol league, whether it needs it or not. If I wanted a finicky pistol I had to clean every time I shot it, I would have bought an expensive target pistol, not spent the money modifying a Ruger Mark II.:D

.22 plinkers get cleaned only when they seem like they need it, but I do the CLP wipe-down on the outside after I get my sweaty paws all over them.

LeonCarr
March 4, 2010, 02:21 PM
The old saying is, "Never let the sun set on a dirty gun". I know that saying comes from the days of black powder, but I still follow it to this day.

Just my .02,
LeonCarr

Ronsch
March 4, 2010, 03:17 PM
Wow...Sounds like I may be in the minority here..

I have a rotational system of PM/cleaning. I will start out by saying that after shooting, no matter how tired or late, I never, ever leave a firearm sit overnight (unless it is a cleaning solution. That said, I generally do the following:

Weekend #1 - I wipe down all blades.
Weekend #2 - I wipe down all of my sidearms.
Weekend #3 - I wipe down all of my long arms (this is also CAS weekend.)
Weekend #4 - I wipe down all of my muzzleloaders.

Again, with actual use, I clean after the range session. I timed my CAS guns for the weekend I shoot that. Generally, my wiping down includes running dry patches through the barrels, chambers, and cleaning the actions of any accumulated dirt, lint, etc. (especially on my EDCs.)

thorn-
March 4, 2010, 04:21 PM
I used to clean every gun after every range trip, no matter what. This took anywhere from 20-90 minutes... sometimes I'd shoot 1 gun, sometimes 4. Now, I clean them when I think they're fouled enough to merit cleaning.

If I put 300 rds through my P99 at the range, it's probably going to be cleaned in the next day or two... but I will put it back in a holster for a night without feeling guilt if I have other things to attend to. If I put 6 rds through my Redhawk, it gets a nice CLP wipedown and then back in the cabinet - I don't break out the brushes and solvent for such little use.

thorn

Kingofthehill
March 4, 2010, 04:23 PM
i clean everytime they get shot. I shoot a few times a week.

heck, if im bored i'll just clean an already perfect one while i watch TV or something. lol.. it very zen like for me

JOe

SOUTHPAW
March 4, 2010, 05:01 PM
heck, if im bored i'll just clean an already perfect one while i watch TV or something. lol.. it very zen like for me

JOe


I do the same! There's something relaxing about cleaning them, same with my Camaro or Corvette, just with less sweat involved. ;) And then the finished product is gorgeous. :)

ArmedBear
March 4, 2010, 05:09 PM
I clean things in order to keep them properly maintained. The more I like them, the more I want them to stay in top shape.

However, I don't buy guns, or cars, so I can enjoy cleaning them, any more than I have toilets so I can enjoy cleaning them.:D

Walkalong
March 4, 2010, 05:13 PM
I clean things in order to keep them properly maintained.
That's about it. I clean them when I think they need it. It's maintenance, that's all.

heavyshooter
March 4, 2010, 05:20 PM
I can't stand the though of a dirty gun in my safe. Yep, cleaned after every range session.

Ditto.

I am not denying the validity of the OP's point. It may be the case that cleaning adds to the wear and tear on the weapon. But I have seen too many weapons fail because they were "dirty." That has nurtured a need within me to clean them after every shooting session.

Heavy

Big Bill
March 4, 2010, 05:45 PM
I clean my guns after every time they are used. And, sometimes I even clean them in between range/hunting trips. I can't stand a dirty gun.

SOUTHPAW
March 4, 2010, 06:10 PM
However, I don't buy guns, or cars, so I can enjoy cleaning them, any more than I have toilets so I can enjoy cleaning them.:D

Neither do I. I drive the hell out of my cars and shoot the hell out of my guns, that is why I bought them. So I also like to keep them clean, and enjoy the process, is there something wrong with that? :scrutiny:

Mr. T
March 4, 2010, 09:45 PM
I clean my weapons every single time I shoot them or take them out into the field. If I go into the field and don't shoot, then I just give them a good wipe down with a lightly oiled rag.

miamiboy
March 4, 2010, 09:58 PM
I think the situation comes down to the intended use of the weapons, and how a person treats their property in general. Some people will treat their property like a newborn baby, and some will keep them in anything but non-functioning condition. Also, for some, their weapons may be just for plinking, and for others, their weapon may be their only one so they want to keep it in tip top condition at all times. Personally, I like to at least do something after a range trip, but I'm also guilty of not touching some after several trips.

RDCL
March 4, 2010, 10:01 PM
Always. Especially right after shooting. Like others have said here I cannot stand a dirty gun sitting over night. Can't stand a dirty gun period.

Gotta keep 'em smellin' like Hoppes 9:D


Russ

ArmedBear
March 4, 2010, 10:20 PM
SOUTHPAW, I don't give a crap what you do, or about your taste in cars for that matter. If it makes you happy, or relaxed, it's a good thing, I figure.

I am just saying that, contra some others, cleaning guns is no particular source of pleasure to me, and if anything, I avoid shooting -- and even purchasing -- guns that take too much cleaning or too much effort to clean. I've found myself really liking bolt guns, over/unders, and revolvers, in part because cleaning them is so much less of a PITA than semiautos.

Kerf
March 5, 2010, 12:48 AM
I used to clean my guns a lot, but now, not so much. They are, after all, inanimate objects and donít know, in and of themselves, whether theyíre clean or dirty. Itís all in the eye of the owner, not so much the beholder.

Ever since I started reading the post on these forums, itís been zero maintenance for me. I was never aware of how much damage I could be subjecting my prized guns to by stripping and cleaning them after every use. Kind of like, third hand smoke, if you follow my drift. After all, I donít wash my car every time I drive it; and, itís not like Iím living in a World War One trench.

I would suggest that everyone try Zero Maintenance for awhile, just to confirm and validate, that you're not cleaning compulsively. There are doctors and clinics that can help treat that condition.

kerf

SOUTHPAW
March 5, 2010, 09:31 AM
SOUTHPAW, I don't give a crap what you do, or about your taste in cars for that matter. If it makes you happy, or relaxed, it's a good thing, I figure.

I am just saying that, contra some others, cleaning guns is no particular source of pleasure to me, and if anything, I avoid shooting -- and even purchasing -- guns that take too much cleaning or too much effort to clean. I've found myself really liking bolt guns, over/unders, and revolvers, in part because cleaning them is so much less of a PITA than semiautos.

Hahaha I agree with you Bear. I said I like to clean my guns, but I'm in the same boat as far as avoiding difficult to clean guns. Out of my current pistols, my 1911 is probably the most difficult to strip/clean and even that's not bad at all. I may have not made myself clear in my previous posts, my personal stand on the OP's question was simply that I like to keep my toys clean, not that I buy them specifically to clean them. ;)

And as far as all this talk of "cleaning a gun to death", a cleaning patch/toothbrush and CLP is not going to destroy or harm a firearm in any way. Taking a metal brush to your gun every day on the other hand, might be a different story... I don't know.

glockmon
March 5, 2010, 09:45 AM
Quote from Ruger Bob " If its been fired, its never over 24 hours before its cleaned. " This has been a rule of thumb for me since I was a kid. Carbon and unburned powder does have an affect on the barrel from about 24 on out.

Old Shooter
March 5, 2010, 10:10 AM
I like clean, properly lubed weapons. After every range session or being out in the field I do a basic tear down, clean, inspect and lube all moving parts. I then re-assemble, function test and put them away until next time they are to be used. If I really, really need to use one of them in a hurry I don't want it to fail to function and be thinking that I really should have cleaned it last week.

It works for me but to each his own.

GRIZ22
March 5, 2010, 10:15 AM
IMHO a lot of wear on weapons is caused by over cleaning.

This happens in the military in a training environment where guns are carried a lot and not shot a lot.

The act of shooting a gun doesn't produce dirt, just carbon which won't hurt anything.

You're wrong there. Carbon can foul rifling, gas systems, firing pin channels and a lot of other things in a firearm.

Their simply isn't that much fouling, I don't notice an accuracy change.


Perhaps in the accuracy you're looking for but I don't know of any rifles that won't suffer some accuracy loss from fouling after 1000-2000 rounds. Try benching the rifle before and after cleaning.

I always clean after every shooting session. Always the bore and strip down for handguns. M1s usually just get the bore punched as it takes a few rounds to settle it in the stock if you take it apart and changes your zero.

I do agree that detail stripping on a regular basis does more harm than good. The only reason I see to detail strip is if the gun is broken. I've always seemed to do a good enough job cleaning after firing any corrosive ammo without detail stripping.

SOUTHPAW
March 5, 2010, 11:36 AM
I do agree that detail stripping on a regular basis does more harm than good. The only reason I see to detail strip is if the gun is broken. I've always seemed to do a good enough job cleaning after firing any corrosive ammo without detail stripping.

I agree on detail stripping. I've never detail stripped any of my guns and don't really look forward to doing it at all. A simple field strip and clean with CLP is all I do.

Ben86
March 5, 2010, 11:55 AM
I clean all of my centerfire guns after shooting because I want them in top working order and accuracy if I need them for SD or hunting. Rimfire, not as much. They are sort of my knockaround guns.

Cleaning does not hurt anything unless you use a substance or material that is highly abrasive. The bronze brush that I run through the bore during each cleaning hurts the barrel 0% because it is a much softer metal than the steel my barrel is made out of. I also look at it this way. I can clean it after every shooting and have an easy time, or clean it after many shootings and have a hard time getting the carbon and copper out. Easy way or the hard way.

It seems to me that not cleaning and properly lubricating them often would result in increased wear and tear. Even if I don't shoot the gun I take it field strip it after about two weeks to clean lint/dust out and properly lubricate it.

Detail stripping makes me nervous. I'm always worried I'm going to loose a part, or forget were it goes, or forget to put it back. I only do that about once a year.

SOUTHPAW
March 5, 2010, 01:17 PM
Cleaning does not hurt anything unless you use a substance or material that is highly abrasive. The bronze brush that I run through the bore during each cleaning hurts the barrel 0% because it is a much softer metal than the steel my barrel is made out of. I also look at it this way. I can clean it after every shooting and have an easy time, or clean it after many shootings and have a hard time getting the carbon and copper out. Easy way or the hard way.

It seems to me that not cleaning and properly lubricating them often would result in increased wear and tear. Even if I don't shoot the gun I take it field strip it after about two weeks to clean lint/dust out and properly lubricate it.

Detail stripping makes me nervous. I'm always worried I'm going to loose a part, or forget were it goes, or forget to put it back. I only do that about once a year.

Absolutely agree with you on all of the above. :cool:

frogomatic
March 5, 2010, 08:33 PM
I clean my guns every time they need it. I also clean an oil them before storing them for any extended length of time.

Locnar
March 5, 2010, 08:35 PM
Every week on Saturday, and every time I return from the shooting range. On weekly cleanings, I simply ensure proper oiling and functioning.

Daveboone
March 5, 2010, 11:04 PM
I dont understand the minimal care concept. I have met many a shooter who doesnt understand why his good firearm has turned to junk. The field use may put wear on the gun, but I have never seen a cotton patch wear a gun. The accumulated fouling can be abrasive. My long guns will get at least a thorough wipe down after each handling and use,and a good take down and bore scrubbing every few sessions- after each use in humid or wet weather. Handguns are thoroughly cleaned after each shooting. I wont depend on a gun that may "almost" be maintained.

thorn-
March 6, 2010, 01:29 AM
I think there's a difference between 'minimal' and 'normal'... or to say it in a different way, there's certainly some cases of overkill out there.

I read a response to this question once (same Q, different thread) in which the owner stated "I do a full cleaning on my handgun. Even if I only shoot one round through it at the range, I break down the slide and barrel just as if I'd shot 200 rds." In my opinion, that's going into the land of obsessive-compulsive.

I won't put up a weapon that i believe is fouled to a point of risking damage or potential failure... but having said that, if I thought that waiting a day to clean 50 rds worth of carbon was going to cause my gun to fail - i'd probably not be depending on that gun to start with.

thorn

danprkr
March 6, 2010, 07:43 AM
Carry guns = after every range session
Fun guns = when they quit working due to crud build up. As a buddy puts, "powder is non corrosive now."

Bhamrichard
March 6, 2010, 10:33 AM
Yer supposed to clean'em?

MIgunguy
March 6, 2010, 10:55 AM
Every Saturday? Seriously??? :scrutiny:

SOUTHPAW
March 6, 2010, 11:41 AM
Yer supposed to clean'em?


Yes... Along with your house... er, I mean trailer. ;)

Redneck with a 40
March 6, 2010, 11:43 AM
I try to clean my guns after every range trip, but sometimes I get lazy and it ends up being a week before I get to it, lol.

Locnar
March 6, 2010, 12:28 PM
Every Saturday? Seriously??? :scrutiny:

I don't clean them every Saturday, its more like running an oiled patch over the parts that need it. Five to ten minutes per gun.

After any trip to the range is when I get them spotless. I've always believed that how you keep your house reflects your character. I think how you keep your gun reflects the same.

MAUSER88
March 6, 2010, 12:53 PM
After every shooting of course.

Hatterasguy
March 6, 2010, 02:30 PM
Interesting.

Don't get me wrong I keep my stuff in top shape. I just don't think that a detailed field strip and a ton of cleaning is needed everytime I put a few rounds through it.

For example a lot of the guys on the Sig forum go nuts trying to get every last little bit of carbon out of the gast block and off the op rod. I don't see the point, a little carbon on the metal doesn't hurt anything. Its the build up that will affect stuff.

marv
March 6, 2010, 09:46 PM
Cleaned my pocket gun yesterday. Blew it off with an air hose. Don't even have to unload it for that.

Sam1911
March 6, 2010, 09:54 PM
I'm going to have to revise my usual response when I hear someone claim that their gun "went off while I was cleaning it." I always immediately retort, "NO ONE cleans a loaded gun."

Apparently, some do!

Cleaned my pocket gun yesterday. Blew it off with an air hose. Don't even have to unload it for that.

Who knew?

bds
March 6, 2010, 10:04 PM
So I am curious now.

How often do the soldiers in combat clean their weapons? We were told "whenever we got a chance because your life depended on it"

Most of my guns get cleaned about once a year (taken apart completely down to every piece), but get field stripped and lubed each shooting session (BTW, I shoot 500-1000+ rounds per session).

SOUTHPAW
March 6, 2010, 10:06 PM
Interesting.

Don't get me wrong I keep my stuff in top shape. I just don't think that a detailed field strip and a ton of cleaning is needed everytime I put a few rounds through it...


Takes me about 30-60 seconds to do a basic field strip any of my pistols. I wipe the slides down with a microfiber cloth then silicone cloth, clean the barrel with a patch and CLP, take a few Q-tips with CLP and get the inside of the frame, wipe off any excess oil and reassemble -- after every time I shoot. Takes about 5-10 minutes total per gun. Longer if I take my time...

gym
March 6, 2010, 10:45 PM
Cleaned after every use. Not scraped with a wire brush. But field stripped and break free or Triflow sprayed and wiped down, rails cue tipped, every interior pard at least wiped clean of powder and surface dirt. Patch down barrell until clean patch comes out. I couldn't put away a weapon full of gunpowder residue, I wouldn't sleep well. It's more about me liking my stuff clean than that it "has to be done".

SOUTHPAW
March 6, 2010, 11:22 PM
...it's more about me liking my stuff clean than that it "has to be done".

Bingo!

Bhamrichard
March 6, 2010, 11:45 PM
Yes... Along with your house... er, I mean trailer.

No trailers allowed in my subdivision, it makes the shacks look bad :neener:

Honestly I wouldn't know the "proper" way to clean one, sure I clean'em I just have no idea if I'm doing it right.. My dad taught me to shoot/handle guns a hundred years ago it seems, but usually by the time his PBR had run out, cleaning them wasn't on his mind anymore..

SOUTHPAW
March 7, 2010, 12:13 AM
No trailers allowed in my subdivision, it makes the shacks look bad :neener:

Honestly I wouldn't know the "proper" way to clean one, sure I clean'em I just have no idea if I'm doing it right.. My dad taught me to shoot/handle guns a hundred years ago it seems, but usually by the time his PBR had run out, cleaning them wasn't on his mind anymore..

:D:D:D:D

Once you know how to disassemble and reassemble the guns basic parts, it's really easy. YouTube is my first stop after purchasing a new firearm... :cool:

gym
March 7, 2010, 01:18 PM
That's good advise, utube offers thousands of gun videos for every type of weapon you can think of. Many of these fellows take their videos very seriouslly breaking them into part 1,2, etc. It's a pretty simple way to learn without having to read a manual. Most of it is just a few steps, take a look it can't hurt.

A and O
March 8, 2010, 03:00 AM
Gentleman I clean all of my guns after each use. Good thing too, last week I found a broken Buffer Bushing in my Mini 14 and and several hairline cracks in the Bolt as well. To me cleaning is a big part in being on top of this sport. To each his own, but I say safety trumps being slack in what we all know needs to be done. Not meaning to be judgmental, just putting it out there that this truly is a safety issue.

My first post on THR

Ben86
March 8, 2010, 11:46 AM
I learned how to detail strip a glock with youtube!

Hellbore
March 8, 2010, 11:51 AM
My Daddy taught me by example to be lazy about cleaning, so I only clean my guns about once a year :uhoh:

But on the other hand, we don't shoot very much. Our guns probably get less than 200 rounds shot through them in a year... then sometimes, several years with zero rounds shot through them!

Hope it's OK. I have never seen my Dad clean a single gun in my whole life, but I have cleaned them for him a couple of times, because I felt sorry for them being so gunked up with carbon...

You think that's bad? Most gun owners I personally know don't clean their guns at all. A lot of them only own a couple guns for home defense and some just plain don't know how to strip them or clean them.

There you have it, the "dirty" truth, I bet a lot of casual shooters are just as bad as we are! I'm thinking this is probably more like the norm.

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