44 mag load help and other questions


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newguy07
March 3, 2010, 12:40 PM
I only have bullseye powder and am trying to load some light 44 mag loads for my marlin 1894 lever action rifle. Going to be shooting 20-30 yards open sight max as this is just for a fun round outside of deer season. THe only manual I have is from Alliant so I used it along with some data I found online and came up with the following loads. Can someone look at them and verify if they are safe as I already have some loaded up to try.

240 grain rainners (lead data)- 5.2 grains of bullseye, also tried some at 5.6 grains of bullseye

240 grain magtech jacketed soft points- 7.1 grains of bullseye

So are these safe?

On a related note, I have heard some people say bullseye wasnt good for 44 mag loads while others say it is good for light loads because its a fast burning powder. So which is it? The other rounds I load are 38 special, and 40 sw, is there a good powder that can produce light shooting loads for all 3 of these that is better/safer then bullseye?

Also considering ordering a manual...which woould you recommend that has the best all around data?

Thanks

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rcmodel
March 3, 2010, 01:01 PM
Lyman # 49 is the most complete manual available with tested data for most bullet types in all calibers.

The Lee manual contains reprints of all the powder makers data and can be useful, if somewhat lacking in detail of exactly what bullet they are talking about.

Both your loads should be safe with the bullets you listed.

Bullseye is not a good powder full full power magnum loads, although it will do fine for light plinking loads. Be aware that the chance of double-charging a case is higher with the very small charges involved. And a double-charge of Bullseye will likely damge your gun.

Pay attention!

rc

newguy07
March 3, 2010, 01:05 PM
RCmodel...thatnks for the post...

Do you have the lee manual handy? What does it list for bullseye and 240 grain lead, 240 grain jacketed?

rcmodel
March 3, 2010, 01:27 PM
I don't use the Lee manual much.
I do have the 2002 Alliant powder guide handy though.

They list 240 JSP / Bullseye / 8.9 grains Max = 1,215 FPS @ 34,700 PSI.
A 10% reduced starting load would be 8.0 grains with a jacketed bullet.

They list 9.8 grains MAX with a 240 lead GC bullet = 1,175 FPS @ 34,400 PSI.

I would treat the Rainier's more as thin jacketed, because the copper plating has a slightly higher coefficient of friction then a grease lubed lead bullet.

rc

newguy07
March 3, 2010, 01:43 PM
So do you think my 5.2 and 7.1 grain loads are dropping too low from those starting loads?

rcmodel
March 3, 2010, 01:56 PM
No, as I said, both your loads should be safe with the bullets you listed.

A recommended 10% reduction from Max loads is done for safety reasons during load development.

That does not mean you cannot go lower then that, as long as it gets the bullet out of the barrel.

Since the .44 Mag is a 35,000 PSI cartridge, you can reduce a lot more then 10% and still get the bullets downrange 100% of the time.

It's a whole different situation on lower pressure 16,000 - 17,000 PSI calibers like the .44 Special or .38 Special.

When they list a starting load for them, that IS a starting load, and going lower can stick bullets in the bore in a loose revolver.

rc

Col
March 3, 2010, 02:47 PM
I use 7.8 grains of unique for my 1894 marlin .44 mag, the velocity is about around the 1200 fps and from my gun is quite accurate,!! should have said using 240 grain lead RNFP

newguy07
March 3, 2010, 02:54 PM
Well I have read threads talking about not using bullseye in magnum cases because of detonation and then also threads saying bullseye was good for light loads....im concerned with being safe.....

rcmodel
March 3, 2010, 03:00 PM
There is no such thing as "Detonation" with Bullseye powder.

Light charges of smokeless powder cannot support a detonation shock-wave in quanities under about a ton or more.

What there is, is guys double-charging cases with Bullseye and blowing up guns.

rc

Six
March 3, 2010, 03:08 PM
If you just want light and fun plinking loads, how about picking up a can of Trail Boss?

I shoot 6.0gr trail boss under a 240gr MBC bullet. It makes a soft load that's very safe and creates virtually zero leading. I love trail boss for .38 and .44. It's extremely easy to work with and with lower pressures than other powders. And, you cannot double charge using Trail Boss, it just won't fit in the case.
http://www.imrpowder.com/data/handgun/trailboss-feb2005.php

newguy07
March 3, 2010, 03:17 PM
can you use trail boss in the lee pro auto disk setup? That is what I have and I guess I should have stated above I also need a powder that works with it

rcmodel
March 3, 2010, 05:10 PM
I haven't seen any Trail Boss data for .44 Magnum 240 grain Jacketed Soft Points though.

It's more a lead cast bullet powder.

rc

newguy07
March 3, 2010, 05:11 PM
Well I only have about 200 jacketed bullets left...if I find that the rainners work well I wont be buying any more jacketed...I purchase my hunting rounds

rcmodel
March 3, 2010, 06:01 PM
Purchase your hunting rounds?

What's the fun in that?

Only reason to ever by factory loads is to get the empty brass.

rc

warnerwh
March 3, 2010, 06:58 PM
Good powders for light loads are Unique and I understand Universal is. Both can be loaded very light and you can look in the shell and see the powder. A double charge is obvious with these powders also. These powders are useful for very warm loads too. I've never used Trail Boss but I think it takes up a lot of shell volume so it's obvious if you double charge.

Six
March 3, 2010, 09:10 PM
I haven't seen any Trail Boss data for .44 Magnum 240 grain Jacketed Soft Points though.

It's more a lead cast bullet powder.

rc

Right, but it should be suitable for the Rainiers.

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