9mm....please educate me


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sixgun MAK
March 9, 2010, 07:05 AM
Would I regret getting a 9mm instead of a 40 S@W or 45ACP? (I already own a Bersa 380)

What are the different 9mms?

What ammo/bullets for SD?

Thank you for your opinions and advice.

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bikerdoc
March 9, 2010, 07:28 AM
Off the top of my head, without knowing any of your circunstances, I would say a 9mm would be the next step for you.

There are many models,and dont overlook used and police trade ins.
I will not put a glass of kool ade in front of you and recommend my favorite, but I would encourage you go hold, rent, and shoot some, until you find the one that says "I am for you"

Many options on ammo also. A good jacketed HP is probably best.

Sorry I wasnt much help. But picking out a gun is like eating an elephant, One bite at a time.

dom1104
March 9, 2010, 07:40 AM
yep. Take a look at Budsgunshop or some other online place and see what strikes your fancy.


Or, www.Gunblast.com for a guy who loves everything :)

Let me ease your mind re: the 9mm.

You probably will never need your gun in your lifetime.
Even if your gun comes out of the holster, you may not need to fire it.
If you DO need to open fire the chance that another caliber would do the job that the 9mm wouldnt, is remote.

So buy a GUN that you can carry 24/7, that you like, and that fits you.

That is 99% of the battle. A huge honking 10mm in the safe does nobody any good.

mcdonl
March 9, 2010, 08:09 AM
But picking out a gun is like eating an elephant, One bite at a time.

Bikerdoc... good pearl of wisdom...

sixgun, something that has made my shooting life much happier lately is I started reloading. of course there are many other attributes to consider between various calibers but if you were to consider reloading it would neutralize the cost issue which can be significant.

(Mine, my opnion... not right or wrong, just an opinion....)

I love 9mm's and they make plenty of good defensive rounds. Combined with the higher capacity magazines, lower ammo cost and ease of shooting it is my preferred round for SD.

AKElroy
March 9, 2010, 08:14 AM
When starting out in shooting, you may be tempted to "graduate" from perceived "low" power to "real" cartriges. Assuming the 9mm is the starting point, resist this track. In real life shootings, there is very little difference in one shot stop percentages between the 9mm, .40, .45.

I would NOT apply this logic to anything short of a 9mm, including the .380. The 9mm is a minimum cartrige in my view for SD / HD.

The additional controlability of the 9mm actually gives it the edge IMO. I have all three, and I feel very well defended with a 9mm; I have several. Find a 9mm that fits, load it with the right ammo (I like light & fast, 115 gr +P+) & you will be very well protected. Check out this site for some comparisons:

http://handloads.com/misc/stoppingpower.asp?Caliber=0&Weight=All

Don't overlook one VERY important point; the 9mm allows MUCH cheaper practice. That is the single most important factor in cartrige effectiveness; a 9mm that you have shot A LOT is far more effective than a .40 that is too expensive to practice with.

FullEffect1911
March 9, 2010, 08:32 AM
9mm is not my pistol caliber of choice, but I am a fan of the .45. Even when I had a 40 S&W I still wanted a .45 auto (and I am a firm believer that a quality 9 +P+, .40 S&W and .45 auto are all on equal footing in stopping potential)

If I ever own a 9mm it will be in a Hi Power for collecting and target shooting purposes. But they come in all flavors, from 1911's to just about every poly pistol out there.

I don't think you'd regret the decision if you think a .380 is enough caliber or if you don't already really want particular cartridge next.

Off the top of my head the "best" current self defense bullet designs are probably the Speer Gold Dot, Federal HST, Winchester Ranger T and Corbon DPX.

I personally believe it's best to pick the handgun first and just take whatever caliber it comes in (9mm .40 or .45).

roundoff
March 9, 2010, 08:34 AM
I made my first self defense handgun purchase fairly recently (< 1 year ago) and once I decided on a 9mm semiauto, these are the models I considered:

Sig P229
Kahr PM9
Springfield XD9
Glock G19/G26
Walther P99

I narrowed it down to the Glock and the XD; after shooting them both, I found I personally preferred the XD. I now own two, one with a 4" barrel and also the subcompact with a 3" barrel, which I carry daily.

I guess my advice boils down to this: make sure it's something you'll actually carry, and make sure you fire it first. Firing it may make you change your mind.

SpodWo
March 9, 2010, 08:35 AM
No problems with a 9mm - there are so many loads and frankly - you can get there by shooting a lot more 9mm at some reasonable price points. 9mm ammo is certainly available again and you can stock up with a boat load of it...

Many prefer to get a 124 or 147g of the JHP or special hollow points for SD that are readily available [albeit expensive].

And you can move up to +P ammo also.

I might add that you may want to consider getting a 9mm pistol that has the ability to shoot a .22 cal conversion barrel/slide. You can further refine your shooting skills and pay even less in ammo costs. This limits your choices of pistols [example - there are no XD or XDm Springfield Armory .22 conversions out there] but you can get the following in 9mms that have that ability:

CZ75
Glock
Beretta/Taurus PT92

Those are those that I know of off the top of my head.

Have at it...

earlthegoat2
March 9, 2010, 08:46 AM
The 9mm has many real world advantages and very few real world disadvantages.

There are a huge number of pistols chambered for the 9mm. Small little Rohrbaughs and big Beretta 92s and everything in between. 1911s are chambered for it as well as nearly every other full framed pistol type. What I am saying is that finding a 9mm pistol that fits you will be easy.

Second is that 9mm is more forgiving to shoot. In similar sized pistols a 9mm will be much easier to put more rounds on target in a shorter period of time then a 40 or 45.

The learning curve associated with the 9mm is smaller than with the 40 or 45 as well. They are easier to shoot well even among experienced 40 and 45 shooters.

The ammo is less expensive making frequent practice sessions more likely. It is better to be good with a less powerful cartridge than be mediocre with a more powerful cartridge.

Here is a quote I heard in a gun shop once. It is a joke but you will get the idea.
Customer: So I hear 9mm does not kill as good the bigger ones.
Worker: Are you kidding me? The 9mm has killed more people than cancer.

Moral of the story is this: The 9mm has been at it for 100 years and is still going strong. The largest police department in the country uses it. It will be adequate for self defense.

In a real world scenario if you hit the bad guy in the chest with a 9mm, a 40 or 45 in the chest is not going to do the job any faster. Trauma evidence of all calibers points to the fact that no matter the size of the hole the damage done is similar and just as devastating.

Classic 9mms like the Luger, Walther P-38, Browning Hi Power, Smith and Wesson 39 and the HK P7 rank high with collectors, shooters, and CCWers alike. I favor the 9mm over any other cartridge and that is after years of thinking the 45 was the only round in existence. I like Beretta 92s, CZ-75s, HK P9S, Glock 19, Steyr M and S9. Almost as a rule if it is chambered in 9mm it will be chambered in 40 as well. The 9mm is usually the first to be released. The introduction of the 40 into a pistol designed for the 9mm can sometimes cause balance and handling issues such as the Browning Hi Power and the HK P7. This is usually not the case though such as the examples from Glock and Springfield.

Guns like the Kahr K9, PM9, KelTec PF9, P11, and Taurus 709 make carrying 9mm handguns a breeze. Though I do not own any of these I think they would make excellent cary options if you chose to use a 9mm for defensive purposes.

SOUTHPAW
March 9, 2010, 09:05 AM
One of my pistols is a 9mm Springfield xD-M. I bought it a year ago because I wanted a pistol for the dual purpose of home defense and a range blaster. My decision to go with that particular brand and caliber were:

- 9mm is relatively cheap to shoot while still being good for defense.
- high capacity is always a plus
- lower recoil makes for good target shooting
- the brand was highly recommended and praised

A year later and over 3500 rounds down range and I can say I am absolutely happy with my decision. I have had ZERO malfunctions and the gun I a breeze to maintain. I have since picked up other guns in .45, .38/.357, .380, and 9mm Makarov, and the 9mm remains the most economical gun to shoot. (although I have to admit my 1911 in .45 is my favorite).

As far as 9mm pistols to consider in the sub $700 range, I'd say look into:

Springfield Armory
Glock
CZ
Beretta
FNH
...

rha600
March 9, 2010, 09:49 AM
the only part I hate about my 9mm is the difficulty in finding ammo down here in south Florida. Otherwise I absolutely love it. It shoots great, the GF likes shooting it (this could be considered a bad thing, haha) and it's inexpensive to shoot.

btw, I have a Beretta PX4 is that matters.

easyg
March 9, 2010, 10:18 AM
Would I regret getting a 9mm instead of a 40 S&W or 45ACP? (I already own a Bersa 380).
In my honest opinion, yes, you will regret not getting a .40S&W or a .45ACP.

I'm not going to trash talk the 9mm because it really is a good self defense caliber.

HOWEVER....

There's a very good reason that the vast majority of law enforcement agencies have abandoned the 9mm in favor of other calibers such as the .40S&W, .45ACP, and the .357Sig.
Some are even choosing the .45GAP.
It's not because the 9mm is a poor caliber, it's just that some of the other calibers perform better at quickly stopping human aggressors with fewer hits.

Again, I'm not saying that the 9mm is bad, but I do think that you will find it somewhat lacking and wish that you had went bigger.
Especially when you're at the range and see guys smaller and weaker than yourself accurately shooting their .40's and .45's.

Just my honest 2 cent's worth.

Good luck,
Easy

easyg
March 9, 2010, 10:19 AM
the only part I hate about my 9mm is the difficulty in finding ammo down here in south Florida.
I haven't seen much on the shelves around here either (NC), and what I have seen is outrageously expensive.

Lv4snobrdg
March 9, 2010, 10:28 AM
my first pistol was a 9, I got pretty good with it, Beretta 92FS. I could drain the 15rd mag on target in just a few seconds. Really learned to tame the barrel lift.

After a few years though I wanted a lil more bang! Upped to a .45, probably never going back. I tell anyone who will listen that it is for patriotic reasons. The .45 is very USA and the 9mm not so much. lol

The 9 is a great place to start and stay, find a range that will rent to you!

earlthegoat2
March 9, 2010, 10:30 AM
It's not because the 9mm is a poor caliber, it's just that some of the other calibers perform better at quickly stopping human aggressors with fewer hits.


This is sound reasoning on the part of LE agencies who have a need for speed in training and cannot take the time to properly train an officer to make rapid accurate shots. This is the reason Glock type pistols are used as well over pistols with a more complicated manual of arms.

sixgun MAK
March 9, 2010, 04:00 PM
Thanks for all of the replies. I find your opinions to always be helpful.

easyg
March 9, 2010, 04:16 PM
This is sound reasoning on the part of LE agencies who have a need for speed in training and cannot take the time to properly train an officer to make rapid accurate shots.
No, I don't buy this notion at all.
Look at the agencies who do train extensively on making rapid accurate shots, agencies like the Secret Service and the FBI....they have also abandoned the 9mm as their primary handgun caliber.
With equal shot placement, the .40 and the .45 are still going to perform better than the 9mm.

This is the reason Glock type pistols are used as well over pistols with a more complicated manual of arms.
More complicated how?
Do you mean just flipping a manual safety, or lowering the hammer with a decocker after chambering a round?
That's not really a heck of a lot more complicated than using a Glock.
Heck, even the Army can teach an 18 year old novice to use a Beretta with decocker in just one week....it can't be that hard.

earlthegoat2
March 9, 2010, 04:50 PM
it can't be that hard.

Maybe not.

I just want to know why virtually all LE agencies are using Glock type pistols then and why almost all of them are in 40 and not 45. I know there are a few using 45 just as there are a few using 9mm still but they are exceptions to the rule. Why are there barely any LE agencies using pistols with manual safeties. Even the Beretta has fallen out of favor.

NO ONE is disputing that the 40 and 45 are more powerful. Anyone who can read can understand this. My objection to the whole thing is that given equal hits there is not going to be much of a difference between any of them. Shoot them in the arm and it is a bad hit regardless of the caliber. Shoot him in the spine and he is going down right now with a 50 AE or a 32 ACP. Penetration tests are even more eye opening in their similarities.

Once again this has drifted off into a caliber war but I guess that was the logical outcome for a thread like this.

Look at the agencies who do train extensively on making rapid accurate shots, agencies like the Secret Service and the FBI....they have also abandoned the 9mm as their primary handgun caliber.

Your right about about this but why did they do it. Was it events like the Miami Massacre?

The FBI HRT uses a Springfield 1911. They have also used Hi Powers. Why they abandoned them in favor of the 1911 is anyones guess. Maybe it was because the bad guys went down faster with 45 slugs and maybe not.

More complicated how?

This has been discussed at length on THR but the Glock is a "point and click" interface. No manual safety. Load magazine, cycle slide, aim, pull. 1911 Load magazine, cycle slide, engage safety, disengage safety, aim, pull.

I agree it does not seem that complicated but when you are talking police depts with limited training budgets and police officers who never fire their guns other than to qualify bi yearly ease of use is a big consideration.

Leafy Cronmer
March 9, 2010, 06:16 PM
Its always more comforting to have your round start in a 4, but I tend to keep the thought in the back of my mind. That accuracy and proper shooting will make a bigger difference than what caliber you are shooting.

I personally like 9mm its cheaper thus I am able to shoot more and become better with said round.

SOUTHPAW
March 9, 2010, 06:36 PM
Its always more comforting to have your round start in a 4, but I tend to keep the thought in the back of my mind. That accuracy and proper shooting will make a bigger difference than what caliber you are shooting.

I personally like 9mm its cheaper thus I am able to shoot more and become better with said round.
I often ask myself, in a one-one stand off, what would I rather have: my 1911 with 8 rounds and another mag of 7 back-up, for a total of 15 rounds of .45, or my xD-M with 20 rounds and another back-up mag with 19 more, for a total of 39 rounds of 9mm...?

NMGonzo
March 9, 2010, 06:41 PM
What platform?

The Lone Haranguer
March 9, 2010, 06:49 PM
Would I regret getting a 9mm instead of a 40 S@W or 45ACP?
No. With the 9mm you can have light recoil in a small gun, fit lots of them into bigger guns, and there are a lot of cool guns made for it.

What are the different 9mms?

While there are several other 9mm-caliber pistol cartridges, the only one you need to concern yourself with is the 9mm Luger (as it is usually known in the US, aka 9mm Parabellum or 9x19). I dislike the .40's harsh, "snappy" recoil in lightweight guns. I do like the .45, but the price of practice ammo is out of hand and you usually need a bigger gun carrying fewer rounds to hold it.

What ammo/bullets for SD?

This round needs a JHP (jacketed hollow point) for best results. FMJ (full metal jacket) is for the range only. Any good one is adequate (one of my favorites is the plain old Federal 9BP, a conventional 115-grain JHP at standard pressure), but the best performers seem to be the 115- or 124-grain JHPs in a +P loading.

RebelRabbi
March 9, 2010, 07:57 PM
Beretta, Glock, Ruger, S&W M&P, Sig, HK...........all work and all are good.

Hatterasguy
March 9, 2010, 09:58 PM
I'd go for the 9mm, your not under guned by any means with that round.

Load with some Federal Hydra Shok's and you have a deadly round. It will do the job if you do your part.

Onward Allusion
March 9, 2010, 10:33 PM
9mm would be the logical next step. There is a plethora of firearms available for this cartridge and it is still cheap enough to practice regularly with. Another advantage is that it has less kick than a 40 or 45 and offers an additional couple of rounds over a 40 and about twice as many rounds as a 45.

With that said, my caliber of choice is the 40S&W. It offers a good compromise between capacity & knock-down. I also like the 45 but I'm not as accurate with that caliber.

As for ammo, I'm old school and still prefer the Hydrashoks. :eek:



sixgun MAK (http://www.thehighroad.org/member.php?u=39737)
9mm....please educate me
Would I regret getting a 9mm instead of a 40 S@W or 45ACP? (I already own a Bersa 380)
What are the different 9mms?
What ammo/bullets for SD?
Thank you for your opinions and advice.

benderx4
March 9, 2010, 11:59 PM
I agree with the majority of the posters here, a good +P 9mm modern self-defense round will be more than you need for 99% of the scenarios you may encounter outside of law enforcement/military.

That being said, having owned and shot the majority of the guns suggested in this thread, I would humbly offer the following suggestions:

Low Budget - Used Springfield XD9

Moderate Budget - Beretta 92FS

High Budget - HK P30L

Whatever you get - practice, practice, practice! Good luck and happy shooting.

easyg
March 10, 2010, 01:43 AM
My objection to the whole thing is that given equal hits there is not going to be much of a difference between any of them. Shoot them in the arm and it is a bad hit regardless of the caliber. Shoot him in the spine and he is going down right now with a 50 AE or a 32 ACP. Penetration tests are even more eye opening in their similarities.
The notion that when given equal hits most bullets give the same results is just not true.
Regardless of what some folks might tell you, "penetration testing" cannot replicate the physiology and psychology of a living human.

But, for good or bad, the USA has had and continues to have plenty of real "life and death" shootings on its streets everyday.
And from all of those shootings it is obvious that the 9mm is simply not that great for quickly stopping and putting down the bad guys.

wilkersk
March 10, 2010, 04:35 AM
...{snip}... that you like, and that fits you....

Yup!

You won't believe what a difference it makes when you get something that actually fits your hand.

Better to have something that YOU are accurate with than to have something that makes a big boom, ... and misses.

johnnylaw53
March 10, 2010, 07:46 AM
But, for good or bad, the USA has had and continues to have plenty of real "life and death" shootings on its streets everyday.
And from all of those shootings it is obvious that the 9mm is simply not that great for quickly stopping and putting down the bad guys. "

I'm nowhere close to an expert but been around a few shootings and always like to reserch as much as I can fine on police shootings. Not sure why most LE agencies have gone away from the 9mm. One situration that stay in my mind was many years ago when most of our officers were still buying our own weapons. We had an escape the bg took the jailer weapon and highjack a car. We ended up in a big chase that ended in a cotton field. The bg took off running with quite a few of us running after him, he turned and pointed his weapon 3 officers open fire two using a .40 one a 9mm 15 rounds fired, 8 hit the guy. The deputy with the 9mm fire 4 times all of his round were center mass and the M.E. stated anyone of them would of been fatal the guys with the .40's missed or make non fatal hits. Now what need to be make clear is the guy with the 9mm was the only one of the three that shot a lot one reason he use 9mm was so he could afford to shoot more. I think most LE goes to bigger rounds since if they hit they think it a better chance the bg will go down faster. The real thing that will make the bg go down is solid hits I rather see agencies go back to 9mm if that what was needed to let thier officers shoot more due to cost. I know most here wont agree but look you guys are on the computer reading about guns and shooting if you were cops and you like the .45 that would be the best choice for you to carry but most here are active shooters and shoot a whole lot more then the average cop.

be safe

Sapper771
March 10, 2010, 09:13 AM
I usually try to keep one pistol in every major caliber. I think it is a good idea to diversify for versatility.
I recommend going to several gun shops/rental gun ranges and trying several pistols out. What I like, u may not. The features and ergos that I require may not be for you.
I carry Glock almost 100% of the time. I guess I have the flavor aid running through my veins. I use Glock because they work for me.
I have used XDs , M&Ps, 1911s, Sigs, CZs, etc.. All nice firearms, and I own several of them, but I carry a Glock because it works for me. Find what works for you, train with it, and carry it.

As far as the caliber debate, I always think to myself on which caliber I would rather be shot with......NONE OF THEM!
Shot placement is king with any caliber. For every instance where the 9mm has failed, one can provide another instance where 40, 357mag/sig, and 45 also failed. I was recently introduced to the "new to me" concept of "positive combat effect" . It basically states that any round that impacts the threat will have a positive combat effect on that threat . For example: the pain inflicted from a gun shot wound to the upper thigh demotivates the attacker, or forces the attacker to divide his attention(pain vs intent vs motivation vs future injury/death). I do believe in this idea( to an extent) as I have seen it many times on the job. One case stands out: Armed home invader took a clean shot through his kidney from a 38spl FMJ , home invader gets up off ground and fleas. Another: two room mates get into a fight, one produces a .22 automatic pistol and shoots the other in the chest once. Man with the gun shot runs out the front door and collapses in the neighbors yard. There are situations where the threat is so coked up that they literally do not feel anything...in this situation, no handgun caliber, short of getting a clean head shot, will be effective.

If you don't feel comfortable with a 9mm, don't carry it. It is important to feel confident with your chosen firearm and caliber. At the moment o' truth, u don't need doubt or hesitation.

easyg
March 10, 2010, 10:15 AM
Now what need to be make clear is the guy with the 9mm was the only one of the three that shot a lot one reason he use 9mm was so he could afford to shoot more.

No, that dog wont hunt.
There's just not that big of a difference in prices between 9mm and .40S&W ammo.
The only thing that is "clear" is that the .40 guys missed alot, for whatever reason.

But blaming the cost of ammo or the caliber for their poor performance is just nuts.
And if ammo cost and ease of shooting were the real determining factors, every cop would be carry a .22 pistol. :rolleyes:

earlthegoat2
March 10, 2010, 10:42 AM
There's just not that big of a difference in prices between 9mm and .40S&W ammo.
The only thing that is "clear" is that the .40 guys missed alot, for whatever reason.

But blaming the cost of ammo or the caliber for their poor performance is just nuts.
And if ammo cost and ease of shooting were the real determining factors, every cop would be carry a .22 pistol.

I tend to agree with this. I think a LEO who is a shooting enthusiast would shoot a lot even if he had a 40 or 45 and would be commeasurately better regardless. I think I would look at it more like the guy who was a very experienced shooter had a 9mm and the two who were not as adept shooters had 40s. Still 9mm is less expensive and it could be just less expensive enough for one person to go to the range 20 or 30 times per year instead of maybe once or twice.

What I am getting at is lets say there are 2 people. One has a 9mm and one has a 40. The one with the 9mm will go to the range 20 times in a year and spend say 500 dollars on ammo. The one with the 40 who is afraid of ammo costs may only go twice a year and spend 40 dollars on ammo. We know who would be the better shooter right.

But here is how it really should work. Lets say they both spent 500 dollars on ammo. 9mm guy shoots say 3000 rounds and 40 guy shoots 2000. I think the difference in who is more proficient would be very narrow indeed.

Still you can make the physiology argument all you want but that also works if you are considering 40s and 45s. How person A reacts to 40s maybe different than how person B reacts to 9mm or 45s or 25s for that matter. I agree that in PURE numbers the 40 and 45 will cause more damage and are more powerful. Once again though I state, given equal hits the difference is going to be so negligible as to be almost no difference in the terminal effectiveness of these rounds.

ForumSurfer
March 10, 2010, 11:31 AM
And from all of those shootings it is obvious that the 9mm is simply not that great for quickly stopping and putting down the bad guys.

And neither is a 357, 45 or a 40. No handgun is going to magically drop a bad guy without a lucky shot that severs his spinal cord. The key to quickly stopping a bad guy is shot placement. Be comfortable and competent with whatever weapon you choose.

That being said, my ccw piece is a 45 that I feel very comfortable with. I can load it, shoot it weak or strong handed, field strip it, whatever it in the dark with confidence. My nightstand weapon, which obviously I trust with the life of my family is a high capacity 9mm. If I were LEO, I'd want a .40 since it is a nice compromise and I can still have 40+ rounds of ammo on my belt, readily accessible. All 3 calibers are excellent choices, you just can't go wrong. Lots of different agencies and military organizations have done extended testing with arguable and questionable results leading them to one caliber or another. It's just one long debate that never ends with 9mm vs 40 vs 45. From all the testing data and real world examples I have studied, the difference between all 3 is so negligible that I feel confident with either of the 3.

If you want stopping power, get a rifle. Handguns don't stop bad guys, they just kill them quickly. A few calibers might stop bad guys like .460 or S&W .500, but those calibers are so large that follow up shots aren't possible...and severe hearing damage will most likely happen should you ever fire them indoors without hearing protection.

SOUTHPAW
March 10, 2010, 01:21 PM
And neither is a 357, 45 or a 40. No handgun is going to magically drop a bad guy without a lucky shot that severs his spinal cord. The key to quickly stopping a bad guy is shot placement. Be comfortable and competent with whatever weapon you choose...

Surfer, I totally agree with you on shot placement. That being said, a penetrating shot to the heart or brain will drop a man, drug-crazed or not, just as fast as the spinal cord.

basicblur
March 10, 2010, 02:27 PM
Would I regret getting a 9mm instead of a 40 S@W or 45ACP?
I’d say no-over the years I’ve tended to move down in caliber as the quality of SD ammo and magazine capacity has increased. My last CC purchase was an XDSC9 (was carrying XDSC40). My early model XDSC40 held 1 more round than the XDSC9 (I’d rather have 9 rds of 40 than 10 rds of 9mm), but since they changed the mags on the 9 (upped the capacity by 3 rds), I’ve gone from the 40 to the 9. Capacity was a partial reason-the 40 (‘specially in a sub-compact) tended to have a bit of muzzle flip, the 9mm much less so-makes for easier double-taps etc.
And before anybody gives you the false argument ‘bout “I’d rather hit ‘em with a 40 or 45 than miss with a lot of 9mm”, I don’t plan on missing with either caliber, but those extra rounds could come in handy!
Convential wisdom says 40 tends to "snap", 45 to "push"-I'd have to concur. Should you go the "4" route, you might consider such-many folks prefer the push of the 45 to the snap of the 40.

What are the different 9mms?
You’ll get tons of answers on this one-I tell a lot of new owners rather than try to sort out the myriad of choices, focus on a highly rated one (doesn’t mean you have to buy it), then when you go shopping, ask yourself why you should buy the particular model you’re looking at over your baseline?
I just helped a newbie go from an LCP to an XDSC9-didn’t tell him to buy it, just showed him the features and told him to use it as a baseline when shopping-he ended up with the XDSC9. Only “bad” thing I can see for the XDSC line is they are tending to get a little thick for CC, ‘specially when compared to Kahr etc.
He chose 9mm for controllability, ammo prices, and he wanted something his wife could shoot without being intimidated.

What ammo/bullets for SD?
Again, you’ll get a variety of answers-don’t know that there’s a whole lot of difference between most name brand SD ammo? In my neck o’ the woods, it’s easier/cheaper to find Gold Dots, usually at police supply stores, some of which sell 50 rd boxes for what many are selling 20 to 25 rd SD boxes for. You might check out Ammunition To Go online for some comparison pricing-a group of locals went together and got enough from ‘em to split shipping costs, but I’ve since found a local store with similar prices.

Ben86
March 10, 2010, 02:35 PM
Would I regret getting a 9mm instead of a 40 S@W or 45ACP? (I already own a Bersa 380)

What are the different 9mms?

What ammo/bullets for SD?

Thank you for your opinions and advice.

I don't know, I know I haven't. If you are comfortable with .380 I don't think you will regret it at all.

I'm not sure what you mean by: what are the different 9mms? I can tell you that 9mm has a superb selection of different types of ammo.

The best ammo for SD is of course a jhp of some sort of premium design and reputable company. My favorite is speer gold dot. I use 124 grain for barrels 4"+ and 115 grain for barrels -4".

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