Stupid question of the week: is it worth saving non-reloadable brass?


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1KPerDay
March 10, 2010, 12:10 PM
Can it be recycled/sold to scrap metal dealers/whatever? will they even accept it?

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budiceman
March 10, 2010, 12:13 PM
Just make sure the primers are brass or deprime them! $1.65 a lb here

Officers'Wife
March 10, 2010, 12:16 PM
If you have a proper foundry furnace it's well worth the effort. My uncle used to cast chessmen from used .22 brass.

1KPerDay
March 10, 2010, 12:30 PM
Just make sure the primers are brass or deprime them! $1.65 a lb here If I could deprime them... I could reload them. :)

How would you deprime berdan-primed brass? With a needle punch or something? :confused:

Kurt S.
March 10, 2010, 01:27 PM
1Kperday, there are berdan decapping tools made: http://www.midwayusa.com/viewProduct/?productNumber=245983
There's a gadget you can make at home that will do it http://www.surplusrifle.com/shooting2005/berdanreloading/index.asp but it looks to me like a good way to produce a high level of creative frustration.

1KPerDay
March 10, 2010, 01:38 PM
are berdan primers available?

Kurt S.
March 10, 2010, 01:59 PM
I think Old Western Scrounger used to have them. From what I gather, they're hard to find.

There are some instructions out there on the web for different ways of converting Berdan brass to Boxer brass (or at least pseudo-Boxer). When I was interested in this I recall seeing that there was some minor tool creation involved, which at the time I just couldn't attempt.

1KPerDay
March 10, 2010, 02:00 PM
Sounds like too much of a hassle to me... does anyone know if metal scrap/recycle places will accept fired brass?

hso
March 10, 2010, 02:06 PM
Yes, they do, but you can resell it yourself on the net if you don't damage it.

Larry Ashcraft
March 10, 2010, 02:07 PM
Some will, some won't. I had one tell once that they couldn't take it because the primers were steel. That's not the case. I think they were just scared of it.

Friendly, Don't Fire!
March 10, 2010, 02:30 PM
I used to have a building renovation buisness and over the course of about 15 years, I collected a small pickup truck-full of miscellaneouls copper, brass, bronze and a bit of steel/iron - but mostly non-ferrous metals.

I decided about eight years ago to take it all to the scrap yard and cash it in. They weighed my pickup truck, emptied some of the metals, weighed it again, emptied metal then weighed it a final time.

OK, all said and done, I got a check from them for $54. I asked them, "are you sure?" Yes, absolutely SURE, that was the amount!

That's it! Fifty-four dollars for the hassle of moving this stuff around my barn, garage and basement for 15 years, overloading my small pickup truck and having to drive about 30 miles (one way) to the scrap yard.:banghead:

When I was done, I realized the $54. barely paid for wear-and-tear on my truck. My opinion then and from then on has been "throw it away and let others sort it out!":uhoh:

I'm done collecting!:rolleyes:

Dimis
March 10, 2010, 03:21 PM
if it is barden primed BRASS you can recycle it as dirty brass which basicly means youll get less money than clean brass (no other metals soldered brased or otherwise affixed to it)
as for the aluminum or steel cases you can decap these and recycle the materials but you cant reload them (at least as far as i know)

it all depends on the recylcing plant as to if they will take them and what they will pay and of course what they will concider clean and dirty materials

Inspector sounds to me like you got ripped off big time
scrapping can be a very lurative event i know several people that do it as there only source of income

when i did HVAC any scrap copper i could keep i would and i turned in 6 outdoor trashcans full of copper (2 clean copper 4 dirty) and walked away with almost a grand

you have to shop around a bit but the prices fluctuate so it might have just been a situation where the materials being sold were in abundance at the time

dureing this past snow storm my workshop roof collapsed and i cant repair the shop so im tearing it down and scrapping it aluminum and steel prices right now around here are good enough that im looking into buying an AR and a few other things with the money

rugerman
March 10, 2010, 04:04 PM
I've got a friend who is ablacksmith I give him mine to melt down & make stuff . I have sold some but the scrap dealer was afraid of it, said that once a live round got mixed in with some that was being melted down and made a real mess. Sort of like dropping a wet bullet back in the lead melt pot.

Larry Ashcraft
March 10, 2010, 04:36 PM
It's just a waste to throw it away. I own a trophy shop. On one side of my metal shear is a box for aluminum, on the other side is a box for brass. I only get about $20 worth of scrap every couple of years (sheet stock is expensive, so I'm careful with it) but saving it is just as easy as throwing it in the trash.

I cash it in when I take a load of aluminum cans, so I don't really count the transportation.

danprkr
March 10, 2010, 09:04 PM
saving it is just as easy as throwing it in the trash.

That's what I do also. My 22 goes into a scrap pile, and once a year when I take in our cans, I take them in to. Never that much money, and if I had to move it I'd probably move it to the trash, but as long as I'm stable there's no reason not to take it in once in a while.

leadcounsel
March 10, 2010, 09:44 PM
Takes little effort to save my brass. I figure it'll be only get more valuable. I've considered saving the steel, but also not so sure in the value. If I had some way to smelt it I would love to have the steel...

Avenger29
March 10, 2010, 09:53 PM
I used to have a building renovation buisness and over the course of about 15 years, I collected a small pickup truck-full of miscellaneouls copper, brass, bronze and a bit of steel/iron - but mostly non-ferrous metals.

I decided about eight years ago to take it all to the scrap yard and cash it in. They weighed my pickup truck, emptied some of the metals, weighed it again, emptied metal then weighed it a final time.

OK, all said and done, I got a check from them for $54. I asked them, "are you sure?" Yes, absolutely SURE, that was the amount!

That's it! Fifty-four dollars for the hassle of moving this stuff around my barn, garage and basement for 15 years, overloading my small pickup truck and having to drive about 30 miles (one way) to the scrap yard.

When I was done, I realized the $54. barely paid for wear-and-tear on my truck. My opinion then and from then on has been "throw it away and let others sort it out!"

I'm done collecting!

2 things- metal prices fluctuate (they were very high a couple of years ago, then came down) and scrap dealers can be crooked. That factor can be mitigated if you know the owner or manager of the scrapyard.

The varying prices of metals can make taking your scrap metal in kind of like trading in stocks. You don't know when the prices are going to peak, or if the price is going to go up more (or a lot more) or whatever.

Hiaboo
March 10, 2010, 10:02 PM
I got $150 for a couple of 5gal buckets full of brass a few months ago, no complaints here.

Officers'Wife
March 10, 2010, 10:46 PM
Hi Leadcounsel,

http://www.lindsaybks.com/dgjp/djgbk/char/index.html

Now you have no excuse. Substitute coal or coke for the charcoal and increase the air volume and it's possible to melt mild steel with the setup described.

Beelzy
March 11, 2010, 09:58 AM
What?!

Save it of course!! It should be part of a recycling process like aluminum cans.

Oh, and the guy who got $54 for his truckload of metal.....you should have separated it.
They gave you the cheapest metal rate (Tin scrap) and ripped you off.

If you enjoyed reading about "Stupid question of the week: is it worth saving non-reloadable brass?" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!