Loading for the Garand


PDA






Warpt762x39
March 16, 2010, 02:53 AM
I don't currently have a Garand, but I do tend to start researching related topics a long way out.

I plan on picking up a Garand from CMP in the nearest future my finances will allow. I've seen that they have gotten a good supply of surplus ammo again (which they said should last a couple years at least) but I know surplus won't last forever.

So does anyone here handload for the Garand? What brand of brass/bullet/powder do you use? Anything I should be aware of before I ever start reloading 30-'06? Any special crimp?

Thank you for any and all advice.

If you enjoyed reading about "Loading for the Garand" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!
rg1
March 16, 2010, 04:38 AM
The Service Grade CMP Garands are a good choice. The HXP Greek CMP ammo is a good buy. Shoots good in the Garands and the cases are ok to reload. They have a stabbed crimp primer pocket and the crimp can be removed with a couple turns of a case mouth deburr tool. Garands are hard on brass. Often the rims are nicked are dinged and I use a small smooth file to remove any nicks and dings to the rim or case head. The Greek en-bloc clips are not quite as good as US ones but are ok. As far as reloading, powders between the burn rates of IMR 4895 and IMR 4064. Bullets from 150 to 168 grains work best. I shoot mostly surplus M2 150 gr. FMJ-FB pulled bullets but also Hornady 150 fmj's. Hornady for one has a Garand 30-06 reloading section in their 7th Edition Manual. Pulled surplus M2 150 fmj-fb bullets are available now here:
http://polygunbag.com/bullets.html
http://wideners.com/itemview.cfm?startrow=13&dir=278|281|727
With 150 gr. weight bullets I use 46-47.5 of IMR 4895 powder with RP 9 1/2 LR primers. The 168 gr match bullets are supposed to shoot great with IMR 4064. Here's a good article:
http://www.alabamaservicerifleteam.com/id17.html
Read the article also on gas gun reloading. I wouldn't wait too long on stocking up on the surplus bullets or the CMP Garand ammo. Supplies can dry up pretty fast. Garand en-bloc GI clips available here as well as other sites:http://www.gibrass.com/misc.html
I recommend a headspace gauge such as Hornady's Headspace gauge set or the RCBS Precision Mic to help set your sizing die to push the case shoulders back a measured amount. Headspace on Garands and other semi-autos can be on the long side of spec. Can be .008" or so and if you push the shoulder back to "zero" every sizing it can result in stretched cases and possible case separations. Also make sure primers are seated flush or below as the Garand like some other rifles has a floating firing pin and high primers can cause slam fires. Garands require the proper grease, not oil, for proper function and lubrication. Hope you get your new toy soon as they are fun to shoot and a great piece of history to have in your collection.

USSR
March 16, 2010, 08:15 AM
So does anyone here handload for the Garand? What brand of brass/bullet/powder do you use? Anything I should be aware of before I ever start reloading 30-'06? Any special crimp?


I use various types of military brass, most Lake City, but also HXP (Greek) and PS (Korean). My powder is surplus IMR4895. With 144gr FMJBT's, I use 49.0gr. With 168gr BTHP's, I use 47.0gr. And with 174gr M72's, I use 46.5gr. With military brass you need to remove the primer crimp. There are cheaper ways to do this, but the very best way is to use the Dillon Super Swage 600 (about $100). Hope that helps.

Don

Noveldoc
March 16, 2010, 08:20 PM
I use mostly swaged GI brass. Also use pulled 158 gr GI bullets that have been re rounded. Varget works fine for me as do Wolf large rifle primers.

Be sure to check case length about every other turn through the die.

Takes a bit of practice and attention to detail but reloading for the Garand can be fun.

PS: got one of those clip on hand case catchers which really helps. M 1s are horrible brass flingers.
Tom

NuJudge
March 16, 2010, 09:19 PM
I shoot mostly in Garand matches, so I need far more accuracy than plinking loads. Full length size your brass and make sure your primers are slightly below flush. Use powders that are in the 3031-4895-4064 on the burning rate chart, or your gas system pressures will be too high, resulting in bad things happening to your Op rod.

There are lots of links for Garand loads:

read all the way to the bottom here:
http://radomski.us/njhp/
http://www.frfrogspad.com/miscellq.htm#duplicate
http://www.handloads.org/loaddata/default.asp?Caliber=30-06+Springfield&Weight=All&type=rifle&Order=Powder&Source=

Powder burning rate chart (case shape, temperature, and other things can move powders considerably):
http://home.hiwaay.net/~stargate/powder/powder.htm

Warpt762x39
March 17, 2010, 12:30 AM
Thanks for the websites and tips. I've got just about everything marked down or bookmarked.

PS: got one of those clip on hand case catchers which really helps. M 1s are horrible brass flingers.

I'm planning on stealing a brass catching screen from the range I used to shoot at in Arizona. Some mesh fabric between two uprights just to the right of the shooting position.

Works fantastic. Plus it doesn't hang off the rifle and leaves the brass in a nice little pile. A little modifying and the brass should land in a bucket at the bottom of the screen.

dc.fireman
March 17, 2010, 12:51 AM
I second what rg1 said about lubrication - it uses grease. Specifically, a stuff no longer made, but still available, called "Lubriplate" , made by Fisher Coach and Body (Yes, the GM folks).

When my dad and I would go shooting, he always ask me if I'd greased or oiled my M1. I just blow him off and say "mumble mumble mumble...blahh blah blah".

And after I fired the first shot string, he come over and whack me on the top of the head, and say " It either needs cleaning, or you used some crappy kind of modern oil in it. It needs GREASE." I finally asked him how he knew when I was using oil or it was dirty, and he told me he learned in his days on Parris Island, that a properly cleaned and lubricated M1 will eject the brass at Two O' Clock. I later found an old paint can style can of genuine Lubri-plate in an old cabinet in the firehouse, and that what I've used ever since. Works pretty damn good too. Imagine that.

-tc

hub
March 17, 2010, 01:21 AM
I'm planning on stealing a brass catching screen from the range I used to shoot at in Arizona. Some mesh fabric between two uprights just to the right of the shooting position.

Why don't you just "steal the idea" and make your own. I doesn't sound expensive to make and I'm sure others would appreciate it. When you build it post up some pictures to show off your work and give us ideas as well.

Maj Dad
March 17, 2010, 01:24 AM
Lubriplate is a trademark owned by Fiske Brothers Refining, Newark, NJ. They make all manner of lubricants, among them greases similar to the old GI Lubriplate, but even better. Their FSL-1 is an aluminum complex based food-grade synthetic grease that is also ideal for semi-auto rifles such as the Garand & M14. I bought a 14 oz. can of it from them & it will last you a lifetime, believe me. The product data sheet is at http://www.lubriplate.com/pdf/pds/8_19_SFL-2_1_0_00.pdf and there are a number of treatises on this grease on the web if you do a little searching. Check out their online store ( http://www.lubriplate.com/webstore/SearchResult.aspx?CategoryID=4 ); all prices include shipping.

GarandNewby
March 17, 2010, 09:07 AM
DC Fireman,
...from which I conclude that they do, or once did, issue Garands to the firefighters in DC, and wanted to make sure that all the FF were properly caring for their equipment. See, the District isn't that bad! (and what kind of conclusions can we jump to from THERE!)

Oldloader
March 17, 2010, 05:54 PM
Hello Group, just joined and surfed for this forum. Appears to be a lot of knowledge here. I have loaded lots of '06 and tripple duece, buy bullets and primers, pick a load from a handload guide and go to it. Use IMR 4895 because I have a lot of it. I have acquired a couple of M1's and a gunsmith friend who collects M1's and the carbines. He has filled my head with more doe's and don'ts than I can remember. Started reviewing my knowledge and did some research on reloading for the M1. I am way behind the curve.
GI ammo, at least the original WW II I have is bad. Mercury primers need to scrub the rifle with hot soapy water. Loading for benchrest rifles and M1 differ. M1 sensitive to powder/bullet weight which I saw alluded to above. Sierra Loading data indicates benchrest primers not satisfactory. I didn't know that. As I follow some of the links post in this forum I may well learn a great deal more. A note regarding Lubriplate, I swear I have seen tubes of it in fishing stores. My M1 guru said the best thing on the market today is Tetra Gun Grease. Going back and review this forum now.

Maj Dad
March 17, 2010, 07:29 PM
I bought a case of Lubriplate butt trap containers and a case of WW2 corrosive bore cleaner from an Army Navy store in Lagrange, GA for a few dollars each. It's still out there, along with Plastilube (dark amber brown), the other grease pots also issued.

WW2 GI ammo did not use mercuric primers - that went away in the 30's. It is corrosive, i.e., forms a chemical salt that is hygroscopic and will rust your bore. It is also very stable and an excellent priming compound, hence its use long after the big war. We used to clean our rifles three days in a row after firing so as to get it all. out, but the mercuric compounds that degraded the brass (and weakened it to the point it could be dangerous to reload & fire) were removed. I still use the old GI bore cleaner, but there are other bore cleaners now that will remove corrosive salts - I won't mention any because I have not used them. I have been known to run wet, soapy patches through the bore then oil it up well - works just as well.

GRIZ22
March 17, 2010, 07:50 PM
if you look on the CMP website everyone uses all kinds of grease on a Garand. They all work. Some greases don't rinse off if the gun gets wet and that would be important in combat. I use Mobil 1 grease but any grease will do.

Your CMP Garand will come with a booklet that shows you where to grease.

Oldloader
March 17, 2010, 08:16 PM
Thank you Maj Dad for the info. Here's another question up for grabs. Years ago before my M1 I load several hundred '06. One batch is labeled 46 gr Imr 4895, Nosler 180 gr ballistic tip BT. Another batch, (I had to download one and weigh) about 47 gr, 180 gr Silvertip. I had planned to use these in the M1 and have fired a few. From what I am reading it appears I do not have a good powder/bullet combination.
I downloaded an old GI cartridge, bullet FMJ, 151 gr, powder 48 gr. GUESSING a 4895. C.O.A.L. 3.31, book says 3.34. I don't suppose that should be an issue.
Comments anyone?

Maj Dad
March 17, 2010, 11:25 PM
Cartridge OAL difference of .03 is not really significant, especially in a Garand. The 4895 loads, if they are safe in a 30-06 (i.e., within the range of acceptable loads and not max barn burners) should do fine in a Garand, as 4895 is the original military powder (we now have IMR & Hornady clones). I have not looked at a manual so the actual loads I cannot comment on, just the powder. And if it is accurate and works well in your rifle, it is a good combination. You have to read your manuals and understand what powder is good for what bullet weight ranges, and how to tailor them to your needs. Some powders are best for lighter bullets, some are ideal for heavier, and all of them have to have the proper gas port pressure curves for the Garand & M1A/M14s. Bolt guns can shoot anything that is safe, pressure wise, irrespective of any other consideration except maximum. I use 4350 in 06 bolt guns for anything over 155 gr and it is the cat's meow, but is unacceptable in my M1s. Tailor your loads to your gun... :scrutiny:

Warpt762x39
March 17, 2010, 11:43 PM
Why don't you just "steal the idea" and make your own. I doesn't sound expensive to make and I'm sure others would appreciate it. When you build it post up some pictures to show off your work and give us ideas as well.

That's what happens when I try to post way past my bedtime. Lol.

I got the idea from the screens they have for use at that range. I was actually asking a neighbor today if she knew the cheapest place to get something like mosquito netting. All I'd need is two uprights and a good size piece of mosquito netting and I'll be set.

I want to try a few "modifications" to the design and hopefull have the screen catch the brass at the bottom and empty itself into a bucket or box.

I have a while to go before I'll need it though.

USSR
March 18, 2010, 08:53 AM
...any grease will do.

+1.

Don

Oldloader
March 18, 2010, 11:54 AM
I am contemplating the catch idea screen too, thinking of using plain nylon window screen, cheap, easy to come by and one can sew it.

gesshots
March 18, 2010, 04:12 PM
Found this data at http://loaddata.com/loads/30-06caliberloads.html
Load Data Members
Selected Metallic Loads
.30-06 M1 Garand (Hornady Handbook of Cartridge Reloading 7th Edition) Reloading Data
Warning! Notes: rifle: M1 Garand; barrel: 24", 1 in 10" Twist; case: Hornady/Frontier; primer: Winchester WLR; bullet diameter: 0.308"; maximum C.O.L.: 3.340"; max. case length: 2.494"; case trim length: 2.484"
Be Alert: Publisher cannot be responsible for errors in published load data.

Wt. Bullet Powder Manufacturer Powder Charge Velocity (FPS)
150 Hornady A-Max or BT-FMJ Hodgdon H-335 Click Here 2,400
150 Hornady A-Max or BT-FMJ Hodgdon H-335 Click Here 2,500
150 Hornady A-Max or BT-FMJ Hodgdon H-335 Click Here 2,600
150 Hornady A-Max or BT-FMJ Hodgdon H-335 Click Here 2,700
150 Hornady A-Max or BT-FMJ Hodgdon H-335 Click Here 2,750
150 Hornady A-Max or BT-FMJ Accurate AAC-2495 Click Here 2,400
150 Hornady A-Max or BT-FMJ Accurate AAC-2495 Click Here 2,500
150 Hornady A-Max or BT-FMJ Accurate AAC-2495 Click Here 2,600
150 Hornady A-Max or BT-FMJ Accurate AAC-2520 Click Here 2,400
150 Hornady A-Max or BT-FMJ Accurate AAC-2520 Click Here 2,500
150 Hornady A-Max or BT-FMJ Accurate AAC-2520 Click Here 2,600
150 Hornady A-Max or BT-FMJ Accurate AAC-2520 Click Here 2,700
150 Hornady A-Max or BT-FMJ Vihtavuori VV-N135 Click Here 2,400
150 Hornady A-Max or BT-FMJ Vihtavuori VV-N135 Click Here 2,500
150 Hornady A-Max or BT-FMJ Vihtavuori VV-N135 Click Here 2,600
150 Hornady A-Max or BT-FMJ Vihtavuori VV-N135 Click Here 2,700
150 Hornady A-Max or BT-FMJ Vihtavuori VV-N135 Click Here 2,750
150 Hornady A-Max or BT-FMJ Alliant RL-12 Click Here 2,400
150 Hornady A-Max or BT-FMJ Alliant RL-12 Click Here 2,500
150 Hornady A-Max or BT-FMJ Alliant RL-12 Click Here 2,600
150 Hornady A-Max or BT-FMJ Hodgdon Varget Click Here 2,400
150 Hornady A-Max or BT-FMJ Hodgdon Varget Click Here 2,500
150 Hornady A-Max or BT-FMJ Hodgdon Varget Click Here 2,600
150 Hornady A-Max or BT-FMJ Hodgdon H-4895 Click Here 2,400
150 Hornady A-Max or BT-FMJ Hodgdon H-4895 Click Here 2,500
150 Hornady A-Max or BT-FMJ Hodgdon H-4895 Click Here 2,600
168 Hornady A-Max or BTHP Accurate AAC-2495 Click Here 2,300
168 Hornady A-Max or BTHP Accurate AAC-2495 Click Here 2,400
168 Hornady A-Max or BTHP Accurate AAC-2495 Click Here 2,500
168 Hornady A-Max or BTHP Accurate AAC-2495 Click Here 2,600
168 Hornady A-Max or BTHP Vihtavuori VV-N135 Click Here 2,300
168 Hornady A-Max or BTHP Vihtavuori VV-N135 Click Here 2,400
168 Hornady A-Max or BTHP Vihtavuori VV-N135 Click Here 2,500
168 Hornady A-Max or BTHP Vihtavuori VV-N135 Click Here 2,600
168 Hornady A-Max or BTHP Hodgdon H-4895 Click Here 2,300
168 Hornady A-Max or BTHP Hodgdon H-4895 Click Here 2,400
168 Hornady A-Max or BTHP Hodgdon H-4895 Click Here 2,500
168 Hornady A-Max or BTHP Hodgdon H-4895 Click Here 2,600
168 Hornady A-Max or BTHP Winchester W-748 Click Here 2,300
168 Hornady A-Max or BTHP Winchester W-748 Click Here 2,400
168 Hornady A-Max or BTHP Winchester W-748 Click Here 2,500
168 Hornady A-Max or BTHP Winchester W-748 Click Here 2,600
168 Hornady A-Max or BTHP Winchester W-748 Click Here 2,700
168 Hornady A-Max or BTHP Hodgdon Varget Click Here 2,300
168 Hornady A-Max or BTHP Hodgdon Varget Click Here 2,400
168 Hornady A-Max or BTHP Hodgdon Varget Click Here 2,500
168 Hornady A-Max or BTHP Hodgdon Varget Click Here 2,600
168 Hornady A-Max or BTHP IMR IMR-4895 Click Here 2,300
168 Hornady A-Max or BTHP IMR IMR-4895 Click Here 2,400
168 Hornady A-Max or BTHP IMR IMR-4895 Click Here 2,500
168 Hornady A-Max or BTHP IMR IMR-4895 Click Here 2,600
168 Hornady A-Max or BTHP IMR IMR-4064 Click Here 2,300
168 Hornady A-Max or BTHP IMR IMR-4064 Click Here 2,400
168 Hornady A-Max or BTHP IMR IMR-4064 Click Here 2,500
168 Hornady A-Max or BTHP IMR IMR-4064 Click Here 2,600
168 Hornady A-Max or BTHP Vihtavuori VV-N140 Click Here 2,300
168 Hornady A-Max or BTHP Vihtavuori VV-N140 Click Here 2,400
168 Hornady A-Max or BTHP Vihtavuori VV-N140 Click Here 2,500
168 Hornady A-Max or BTHP Vihtavuori VV-N140 Click Here 2,600
168 Hornady A-Max or BTHP Alliant RL-15 Click Here 2,300
168 Hornady A-Max or BTHP Alliant RL-15 Click Here 2,400
168 Hornady A-Max or BTHP Alliant RL-15 Click Here 2,500
168 Hornady A-Max or BTHP Alliant RL-15 Click Here 2,600
168 Hornady A-Max or BTHP Vihtavuori VV-N150 Click Here 2,300
168 Hornady A-Max or BTHP Vihtavuori VV-N150 Click Here 2,400
168 Hornady A-Max or BTHP Vihtavuori VV-N150 Click Here 2,500
168 Hornady A-Max or BTHP Vihtavuori VV-N150 Click Here 2,600
168 Hornady A-Max or BTHP Hodgdon BL-C(2) Click Here 2,300
168 Hornady A-Max or BTHP Hodgdon BL-C(2) Click Here 2,400
168 Hornady A-Max or BTHP Hodgdon BL-C(2) Click Here 2,500
168 Hornady A-Max or BTHP Hodgdon BL-C(2) Click Here 2,600
178 Hornady A-Max or (discontinued) Vihtavuori VV-N135 Click Here 2,200
178 Hornady A-Max or (discontinued) Vihtavuori VV-N135 Click Here 2,300
178 Hornady A-Max or (discontinued) Vihtavuori VV-N135 Click Here 2,400
178 Hornady A-Max or (discontinued) Vihtavuori VV-N135 Click Here 2,500
178 Hornady A-Max or (discontinued) Hodgdon Varget Click Here 2,200
178 Hornady A-Max or (discontinued) Hodgdon Varget Click Here 2,300
178 Hornady A-Max or (discontinued) Hodgdon Varget Click Here 2,400
178 Hornady A-Max or (discontinued) Hodgdon Varget Click Here 2,500
178 Hornady A-Max or (discontinued) Hodgdon Varget Click Here 2,550
178 Hornady A-Max or (discontinued) Hodgdon H-4895 Click Here 2,200
178 Hornady A-Max or (discontinued) Hodgdon H-4895 Click Here 2,300
178 Hornady A-Max or (discontinued) Hodgdon H-4895 Click Here 2,400
178 Hornady A-Max or (discontinued) Hodgdon H-4895 Click Here 2,500
178 Hornady A-Max or (discontinued) Hodgdon H-4895 Click Here 2,550
178 Hornady A-Max or (discontinued) IMR IMR-4895 Click Here 2,200
178 Hornady A-Max or (discontinued) IMR IMR-4895 Click Here 2,300
178 Hornady A-Max or (discontinued) IMR IMR-4895 Click Here 2,400
178 Hornady A-Max or (discontinued) IMR IMR-4895 Click Here 2,500
178 Hornady A-Max or (discontinued) IMR IMR-4895 Click Here 2,550
178 Hornady A-Max or (discontinued) Winchester W-748 Click Here 2,200
178 Hornady A-Max or (discontinued) Winchester W-748 Click Here 2,300
178 Hornady A-Max or (discontinued) Winchester W-748 Click Here 2,400
178 Hornady A-Max or (discontinued) Winchester W-748 Click Here 2,500
178 Hornady A-Max or (discontinued) Vihtavuori VV-N140 Click Here 2,200
178 Hornady A-Max or (discontinued) Vihtavuori VV-N140 Click Here 2,300
178 Hornady A-Max or (discontinued) Vihtavuori VV-N140 Click Here 2,400
178 Hornady A-Max or (discontinued) Vihtavuori VV-N140 Click Here 2,500
178 Hornady A-Max or (discontinued) Vihtavuori VV-N140 Click Here 2,550
178 Hornady A-Max or (discontinued) IMR IMR-4064 Click Here 2,200
178 Hornady A-Max or (discontinued) IMR IMR-4064 Click Here 2,300
178 Hornady A-Max or (discontinued) IMR IMR-4064 Click Here 2,400
178 Hornady A-Max or (discontinued) IMR IMR-4064 Click Here 2,500
178 Hornady A-Max or (discontinued) IMR IMR-4064 Click Here 2,550
178 Hornady A-Max or (discontinued) Vihtavuori VV-N150 Click Here 2,200
178 Hornady A-Max or (discontinued) Vihtavuori VV-N150 Click Here 2,300
178 Hornady A-Max or (discontinued) Vihtavuori VV-N150 Click Here 2,400
178 Hornady A-Max or (discontinued) Vihtavuori VV-N150 Click Here 2,500
178 Hornady A-Max or (discontinued) Vihtavuori VV-N150 Click Here 2,550
178 Hornady A-Max or (discontinued) Hodgdon BL-C(2) Click Here 2,200
178 Hornady A-Max or (discontinued) Hodgdon BL-C(2) Click Here 2,300
178 Hornady A-Max or (discontinued) Hodgdon BL-C(2) Click Here 2,400
178 Hornady A-Max or (discontinued) Hodgdon BL-C(2) Click Here 2,500
178 Hornady A-Max or (discontinued) Hodgdon BL-C(2) Click Here 2,550
178 Hornady A-Max or (discontinued) Alliant RL-15 Click Here 2,200
178 Hornady A-Max or (discontinued) Alliant RL-15 Click Here 2,300
178 Hornady A-Max or (discontinued) Alliant RL-15 Click Here 2,400
178 Hornady A-Max or (discontinued) Alliant RL-15 Click Here 2,500











Home | About Us | Cartridge of the Month | Articles | Signup | Disclaimer | FAQs | Gun Links
Discount Sporting Goods | Newsletter | Riflemagazine.com | Handloadermagazine.com | Successfulhunter.com


2010 PPC, INC. All Rights Reserved. LoadData is registered in the U.S. Patent & Trademark Office

Warpt762x39
March 18, 2010, 11:39 PM
I am contemplating the catch idea screen too, thinking of using plain nylon window screen, cheap, easy to come by and one can sew it.

I was looking at mosquito netting. Not as stiff as window screen. Plus if you fold it up towards you so there is a trough at the bottom, you should be able to catch the brass in it.

Oldloader
March 19, 2010, 10:02 PM
I would like to see if I can get dialed in to shoot competition someday, I am kind of locked in to IMR 4895 because I have so much of it. You know, champaign appetite, beer budget. I have ordered Nosler 168 gr HPBT to reload and figure 46 gr 4895 to start. Some references go as high as 47.5 gr and some references say that is too much. Needless to say I am confused. Enlighten me please.

Oldloader
March 30, 2010, 01:56 PM
I tried the upright screen thing, didn't do well at all. Brass still went all over the map. Considering an arch or tunnel affair.

Warpt762x39
March 30, 2010, 10:45 PM
Well it looks like I'll be ordering a Garand in the near future. Good thing I've been researching reloading component prices. :)

hub
March 31, 2010, 04:37 AM
Awesome, good luck hope you get a good shooter. Did you ever build a screen?

Warpt762x39
March 31, 2010, 11:28 PM
Not yet. It's looking like the next time I'll be going to the range won't be for at least 3 weeks though. If I can get something put together I'll bring it and I'll post up a report with pics.

cheygriz
April 1, 2010, 01:42 PM
Remington or winchester 147-150 GR FMJ bullets

Remington 9 1/2 large rifle standard primers. (The Remington 9 1/2 primers are MilSpec, the others aren't, except for some special order CCIs.)

IMR 4895

G-I brass

And you'll have the rifle and ammo we carried onto the beaches in WW-2! :evil:

Sport45
April 2, 2010, 04:53 AM
I was looking at mosquito netting. Not as stiff as window screen. Plus if you fold it up towards you so there is a trough at the bottom, you should be able to catch the brass in it.

I don't know if mosquito netting will hold up very well if you're trying to catch the brass. That stuff is pretty hot for a while. Might be better to deflect it into a confined area.

Warpt762x39
April 2, 2010, 10:29 PM
I don't know if mosquito netting will hold up very well if you're trying to catch the brass. That stuff is pretty hot for a while. Might be better to deflect it into a confined area.

Well not so much catch it as in stop it and hold it but stop its forward momentum so it drops down to some sort of bucket. Like the batting cage nets. Same basic principle, different projectile to stop.

Warpt762x39
April 5, 2010, 01:38 AM
On a similar note, I know reloading surplus brass is tougher than commercial brass and that it doesn't usually last as long.

Seeing as a 1903 is towards the top of my to buy list, would the surplus brass originally fired from a Garand and full length resized before being reloaded, last longer in a bolt action when it's only neck sized?

I know the brass from surplus is generally thicker, but would trimming the brass for case neck thickness, i.e. slightly thinner but more uniform all around, keep the brass usable longer?

Also, what might annealing the case do for brass life in either the Garand or the 1903? I've heard that annealing the case neck after a few firings and resizings can help extend the life of the brass in regards to cases splitting at the neck.

If I can reuse the surplus brass later, it would keep my component brass costs down a bit and make it easier to distinguish between the loads for the Garand and the ones for the 1903.

rscalzo
April 5, 2010, 02:50 PM
M-1 lubrication..
http://www.brownells.com/.aspx/pid=6525/Product/LUBRIPLATE_130_A_MIL__SPEC__GREASE

Found this data at http://loaddata.com/loads/30-06caliberloads.html
No use without the powder weighs.

If you enjoyed reading about "Loading for the Garand" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!