Gun average?......


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Rembrandt
March 16, 2010, 12:46 PM
Some years ago I purchased a firearm software package to keep track of the collection. It has some interesting features, like a running total number of guns, what was paid and current appraised values. Just for fun I decided to divide the number of guns into what they were purchased for + accessories......then divided the same number of guns into the current total value.

Findings: average cost per gun $750.00......average value today per gun $1750.00

Return on investment is difficult to calculate because of how long ago some of these were acquired. On a few pieces could have done better with other investments, but it wouldn't have been as much fun. I'm happy.

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budiceman
March 16, 2010, 01:29 PM
Wow maybe I should of had that before I was in the boating accident and lost ALL my guns!

Claude Clay
March 16, 2010, 01:36 PM
appraised and actually sell for can be 2 different amounts. but ya still did very well
i kinda cring when someone asks if buying guns are a good investment. this cause
the more commen guns are a not really but--if you buy carefully and spend perhaps
a bit more on say a S&W snubbie vs a charter arms or taurus, in 5 to 8 years you will
likely get all your $ back and perhaps a bit more. and have had the fun of having and shooting it.

buying rear or engraved is a whole other approach--talk to a real expert than.

Rembrant, though i dont have a program i do check up on items when i change the clocks. my 351pd really stood out this time:D

ConstitutionCowboy
March 16, 2010, 01:40 PM
Wow maybe I should of had that before I was in the boating accident and lost ALL my guns!

You can still fantasize!

Woody

ny32182
March 16, 2010, 01:44 PM
You'd just need to inflation-correct the purchase prices, and then calculate an ROI from there...

Guns hold their value a lot better than most other fun stuff we might buy, but I believe it is a mistake to consider them "investments"... they are not investments; and if you need to sell them quickly you will not get the best price for them unless you are very lucky running immediately into the right buyer. Plus you are taking a 100% loss on ammo, so if you actually want to shoot them, owning them is definitely costing you money, not making you money.

Holding residual value is a nice perk compared to golf clubs and sports cars, however.

JohnBT
March 16, 2010, 03:18 PM
I would need the inflation adjustment feature...

My Single Six was just $50 or so 40 years ago.

My Marlin Mountie was a gift nearly 50 years ago. What was it back then, about $85?

My dad's 1990 Python, for one example, was just $599.95.


Can it tell me how much I paid for all of those useless holsters rotting in the box in the back of the closet?



"owning them is definitely costing you money"

Sounds like a mail order bride. :)

Pat-inCO
March 16, 2010, 03:57 PM
Return on investment is difficult to calculate because of how long ago some of these were acquired.

Geez, I buy guns because I like to shoot. :scrutiny:

22-rimfire
March 16, 2010, 04:57 PM
Some guns do okay from an appreciation perspective. I suspect that the majority pretty much follow inflation. But that is not so bad since if you put money in CD's, you're loosing money because of inflation overall. Buy them because you like them or want to use them, and if they grow in value above inflation; great. Inflation has a compounding effect just like a CD.

I don't think I'd post an average gain in value because the value is a paper value. You have to sell them to see the gain.

RyanM
March 16, 2010, 05:05 PM
Plus you are taking a 100% loss on ammo, so if you actually want to shoot them, owning them is definitely costing you money, not making you money.

Not quite 100%. Brass is worth a good amount of money, usually a $1 to $5 return per box of 50. More, for the really desirable calibers.

ny32182
March 16, 2010, 05:18 PM
Not quite 100%. Brass is worth a good amount of money, usually a $1 to $5 return per box of 50. More, for the really desirable calibers.

I knew as I typed that someone would mention they sell the brass. :D I think that is the exception though. I either reload it or leave it for someone who does, depending on caliber and time constraints; I think most people do... I get some cost savings on future ammo, but no cash back as far as that goes... I do see the occassional guy just literally picking up anything he can get at the range though.

DammitBoy
March 16, 2010, 05:27 PM
My guns get all the appreciation they're ever going to get when I shoot them.

Since I'm never selling any of them, their resale value is irrelevant to me.

wishin
March 16, 2010, 05:46 PM
Holding residual value is a nice perk compared to golf clubs and sports cars, however.
So right when it comes to cars. I never heard of a gun owner being "upside down" on a firearm. Wish I still had some of the desirable guns I've parted with over the years for want of cash.

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