Beretta Store


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Golden_006
March 17, 2010, 01:54 PM
Anyone ever been to one? I think there are only 2. nice guns. I took one look at the price tags 3000-4000 dollars for a shotgun :eek: and walked right out. Sure the thing looks like it has a gold plated trigger but give me abreak, Think I'll go to Sports Authority and pick up a Maverick 88 for $219.

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hnk45acp
March 17, 2010, 02:18 PM
Been to the one here in NYC. You'd have passed out, they had $150,000.00 pairs of custom shotguns.

Acera
March 17, 2010, 02:21 PM
hnk45acp I am with you on that.

Golden_006 did you only look at stuff in the clearance/bargain bin??

Please don't tell me the Dallas store has gone to almost Wal-Mart standards.


If you don't understand the store, you don't belong in there:neener:

Oregun89
March 17, 2010, 02:40 PM
Beretta :evil:

AcceptableUserName
March 17, 2010, 02:42 PM
Robert Blake RULES

Golden_006
March 17, 2010, 02:42 PM
ooops

wishin
March 17, 2010, 03:28 PM
Haven't been to their store, but they do make some beautiful guns.

19-3Ben
March 17, 2010, 03:52 PM
I took one look at the price tags 3000-4000 dollars for a shotgun and walked right out.

LOL. For a lot of people (myself not included) that's really not all that much for a good shotgun! Heck, for people who do a lot of skeet/trap shooting, the decent guns start in the $2k range.

OregonJohnny
March 17, 2010, 03:57 PM
I've been to 2 Beretta stores, actually. The one in New York City about 10 years ago, and the one in Milan, Italy about 2 years ago. Both were beautiful stores, with multiple rooms decorated in African safari themes. The NYC store was not a great experience, as I was an 18-year-old kid in street clothes wandering in wide-eyed. They were less than polite to me. But hey, it's New York, right?

The Milan staff was a little more cordial, and their gun gallery downstairs was amazing. They had a whole case of beautiful wood shotgun stocks, waiting to be carved and custom-fit to the buyer.

For a true old-world customer-service gun store experience, I recommend the Holland & Holland store in New York. I went there after Beretta and they took me up in the elevator to the gallery. They even pulled out a used shotgun for me to hold. When I saw the 5-digit price tag, I smiled and gently handed it back. The staff there were all British, and very polite.

oneounceload
March 17, 2010, 04:39 PM
Anyone ever been to one? I think there are only 2. nice guns. I took one look at the price tags 3000-4000 dollars for a shotgun and walked right out. Sure the thing looks like it has a gold plated trigger but give me abreak, Think I'll go to Sports Authority and pick up a Maverick 88 for $219.

That's the bottom starting point for a good target gun. Some folks CAN appreciate the differences, some prefer pumps - nice we have the choices we do

Zundfolge
March 18, 2010, 04:07 PM
So the other day I walked into a Porsche dealership ... $100,000 for a car? To hell with that I can get a used Chevette for $300!

Robert
March 18, 2010, 04:13 PM
To hell with that I can get a used Chevette for $300!
They are both have tires so the Chevette will be just as good as the Porsche...

earlthegoat2
March 18, 2010, 04:15 PM
I have gone to the Holland & Holland showroom in NYC. Greatest place on earth. The staff there do not care if you are going to buy a gun or not. If you look like a homeless man on the street they will treat you like you are their best customer.

Robert
March 18, 2010, 04:18 PM
We poke fun, but one really does get what they pay for. Will the Mav88 go bang every time? Sure. But you are buying a Beretta for their craftsmanship and quality that a Mav88 will never even come close to. I would never pay that much for a shotgun but I tend to not be a huge shotgun guy anyway.

ArmedBear
March 18, 2010, 05:23 PM
Think I'll go to Sports Authority and pick up a Maverick 88 for $219.


No doubt, a Maverick 88 is a much better shotgun than a $4000 Beretta.

...for poaching, in case you get caught.:neener:

wishin
March 18, 2010, 06:20 PM
They are both have tires so the Chevette will be just as good as the Porsche...
Uh huh................:rolleyes:

oneounceload
March 18, 2010, 06:57 PM
Of course, some folks think that dogs playing poker on black velvet is classical art as well............

ArmedBear
March 18, 2010, 08:02 PM
What, you're not an admirer of Cassius Coolidge?:D

You know, a pair of his originals were sold to an anonymous buyer in 2005 for $590,400. And people think a few grand is a lot to pay for a nice shotgun...:p

SuperNaut
March 18, 2010, 09:00 PM
This is from my blog from early '07

I visited the Beretta Gallery in NYC today and apparently there are two stores in the same building. One that is welcoming and one that is not. The gallery itself is a gorgeous storefront in a great location just off Central Park East. I was impressed with the clothing section but went immediately upstairs because that is where they have the guns.

Upstairs is a fantastic selection of Beretta shotguns, unusual to find in anti-gun Manhattan. The salesman and the resident gunsmith were soon laughing at my jokes and making some back. I told them that some of my online friends would be surprised that such a store existed in the heart of Manhattan and I asked if I could take a picture or two. The gunsmith said “sure man” so I took a couple of shots. I made my way slowly back downstairs admiring the high-quality guns and accessories along the way.

Once I made it downstairs I moved to the front of the store to get a nice wide shot of the showroom but before I could get the shot a security guard stopped me and sternly said “no photos!” I politely asked him why not and he was clearly unprepared for that question because he stammered out some disjointed b.s. about company policy. So I changed the question to; “why is it company policy to not allow photos of the clothing section?” He had no answer to that so I continued; “I have some online friends who would be interested in the shop and it is a real shame that Beretta company policy prevents that. He replied “It is Beretta Corp. company policy.” “Okay” I said and turned my camera off and put it in my camera bag and snapped the clasp.

I then went back upstairs and looked around the hunting supplies and after a few minutes looking at the books I turned around and the security guard was at the bottom of the stairs watching me. I moved over to the jackets and he moved to the front of the store so he could watch me through the railing. Feeling distinctly uncomfortable I then moved to the knives and the security guard changed his vantage point to see me better. After a moment I moved back to where the boots are and the security guard moved away from the front of the store and I felt a little better. I picked out a book on Beretta history and a really cool Beretta multi-tool (you can’t have too many multi-tools) and went back downstairs to the register. To my surprise the guard and the saleswoman at the register were watching me on the security monitor.

Trying not to be angry I paid for my book and multi-tool and left. Now I understand that Manhattan has its problems and the people there aren’t always hospitable but, in a store that is supposed to be a “rendevous for people who enjoy hunting, life outdoors and good living, and a place where special events can be celebrated"—Ugo Gussalli Beretta, I felt particularly unwelcome. What happens when the people “celebrating a special event” want to take photos?

I was even wearing a pair of Beretta brush pants and a linen shirt at the time, it isn’t as if I looked like a hoodlum.

Dear Beretta: I wish I could have spent a lot more time and money at your gallery, but I didn’t feel welcome.

http://mojophilter.files.wordpress.com/2007/10/bgsitting.png

http://mojophilter.files.wordpress.com/2007/10/bgny.png

http://mojophilter.files.wordpress.com/2007/10/bgsmithy.png

Golden_006
March 19, 2010, 09:22 AM
I said they were nice guns. What are you giving me a hard time for? To be honest I don't know enough about guns to tell the difference except from the looks of it. And I don't care.. The thing goes bang; recoils like a b%t# whether 200 or 20,000 gold trigger or not, no?

A 300 chevelle means your getting it towed more than your driving it.

A new Ford truck can be had for about 50% of a Porshe give or take. My 12 year old one costs about the same as that gun; rides nice; looks nice; drives through snow and I'd take it cross country in 1 second. Not to mention unlike a porshe I can actually fit in it. You tell me what a 10000 dollar shotgun can do that a 400 dollar one can't?

A Remington or Mossberg can be had for 5-600 dollars; looks nice, goes bang every time etc and is 90% less than said shotguns.

Looks like that store is just like every other one in that area. i.e. you're paying premium because of their location and because they have nice interior decorators. Same with neiman marcus or whatever. Just pissed me off that the only place near there with any guns on their wall is that one of all things and when I called were like it was a dumb question that I asked if they had any guns on display.



I don't have that kinda cash in my budget and even if I did I doubt I'd pay that kind of money for a shotgun. This reminds me of poeple who drink whiskey and insist on like Knobb creak. I drink Bushmills. It takes the edge off and tastes strong in any case. Sometimes I'll even have Jack Daniels. I do have some Black label at home however but whatever. They cost 50% more not 500% more.its just snobbery really and I got better things to do.

Justin
March 19, 2010, 11:15 AM
If you don't get it, and aren't willing to try to get it, I'm not sure that any text spent on attempting to convince you otherwise is going to be anything but a waste of electrons. Yet against my own instinct, here I go...

While a four- or five-figure Beretta shotgun is, to some extent a status symbol, it's very likely that such a firearm comes with a number of amenities not available on a Maverick 88, like having a gunsmith take your measurements to fit the stock to you.

If there really and truly were no difference between a custom shotgun and a run-of-the-mill pump gun, you'd likely see them being used by Olympic Trap and Skeet competitors. In reality, that is plainly not the case. If you can't tell the difference, that's ok. But just because you can't tell a difference doesn't mean that no difference exists, especially for someone who's invested significant time and resources into understanding how to use a shotgun for clays or hunting.

ArmedBear
March 19, 2010, 11:23 AM
Knobb creak

Is that a Chinese copy of Knob Creek or something?

Thank God for Bourbon. It provides some of the casks in which whisky is aged.

And please tell me you know the difference between a Chevette and a Chevelle. One need not be a snob to know that one. The last few Chevelles I saw were racing in Bomber Stock class at a local 3/8 mile track, and I was eating nachos and a corn dog, while drinking Coors.


A new Ford truck can be had for about 50% of a Porshe give or take. My 12 year old one costs about the same as that gun; rides nice; looks nice; drives through snow and I'd take it cross country in 1 second. Not to mention unlike a porshe I can actually fit in it. You tell me what a 10000 dollar shotgun can do that a 400 dollar one can't?

Having driven over 1000 miles straight, in several different vehicles at different places and times, I assure you that the trip in the Porsche was far and away the most pleasant one, as well as far and away the most fun. It was an old Porsche, but like a nice shotgun, the way it felt stood up well to the tests of time, even if some of its parts were worn. They actually have great leg room, without the problem of having to fit an engine in front. The low seating position with stretched-out legs made the trip really comfortable, whereas a truck seat makes my glutes fall asleep after a few hours.

And as for a shotgun, well, the guy who took gold in International Skeet in Beijing was shooting a DT-10, not an 870 or 500, so there's something. I own an 870, and I don't have a DT-10, BTW. Furthermore, I don't care what anyone ELSE has; I decide what I like, what's worth it to me, and what I can afford. It's good that you can say, "I can't afford X." Too many Americans can't say that, and it's gotten us all into some deep crap lately.

Just pissed me off that the only place near there with any guns on their wall is that one of all things and when I called were like it was a dumb question that I asked if they had any guns on display.

I admit, I do sound like that when I talk, sometimes. But I can turn it off when I write... And it wasn't the smartest question anyone ever asked, either... I might have asked the same thing, but if I did, I wouldn't be surprised that it made me sound like a rube, and I'd just suck it up, like a grownup with a sense of humor.:D This isn't about snobbery -- imagine someone with New York plates driving into the parking lot at Talladega Superspeedway and asking the first person he sees, "Hey, is this where the car races are?"

Seriously, if you don't want to invite gentle mockery, then perhaps you should consider not starting a thread the way you did, or digging yourself deeper and deeper. And watch how dogs or wolves behave in a pack. There's a lot to learn from that.

Have a nice day. (And don't expect anyone in New York City to say, "Have a nice day", unless you relish disappointment.):)

Golden_006
March 19, 2010, 12:38 PM
Chevette/ Chevelle, Knob Creak/Knobb Creek . . . you're missing the point.

A 300 dollar clunker is a 300 dollar clunker no matter if it's a chevelle or a k car or a chevette. It does not function for its purpose. A 350 dollar Mossberg does. Which in my case -- and many others for the most part -- helps me sleep at night and I have something more than just my ---- in my hand when I hear a strange noise in the middle of the night.

I used to have to drive to Canada in the moutains in the snow, late to meetings and all. I've taken that truck camping. i've taken that truck to a beach and parked in marshland because no other spots were available. I drive that thing in a blizzard without shoveling anything. i drove in rain storms . . . I could do none of those things in a Porshe. But that's not the point. The point is is my truck costs 1/8 of a new porshe and in some cases only 1/2 if new. I guess you could argue that since my truck provides the utility that a Porshe can not -- it could be 1/8 the price. Those guns cost 500-1000% more . . . I guess if you're an olympic athlete a gun that costs more than my truck makes sense . . . otherwise I don't see the utility that it provides for 500+ %. Although I doubt you're arguing that -- to you the prices are what they are and worth it if you have the money.


I said it before you're shopping for guns at Nieman Marcus when you go there. I just can't believe it's the only place that has guns on the wall around there. Further my question to that guy wasn't dumb. i've been to 2 "gun stores" by where I work in the city and none of them have any guns on the wall if at all.

You say the trouble with America is many can't say they can't afford this or that I say it's that too many care about their toys without much regard to anything else.

waterhouse
March 19, 2010, 01:40 PM
I said they were nice guns. What are you giving me a hard time for? To be honest I don't know enough about guns to tell the difference except from the looks of it. And I don't care.. The thing goes bang; recoils like a b%t# whether 200 or 20,000 gold trigger or not, no?

People are giving you a hard time because you did the equivalent of walking into a BMW dealership, looking at the sticker price, and then writing on the internet that you went to look at a BMW, were shocked at the price, and now you were planning on buying a Hyundai for cheaper.

There is nothing wrong with driving a Hyundai. It can be argued till the cows come home about whether a BMW is worth the additional cost over a Hyundai. But most people understand that there are cars priced at different levels, and most people know approximately where BMW is on that scale, so they would find it a little silly if someone said "Holy cow, have you seen what the BMW dealership is selling their cars for? Cheaper cars also get you from point A to point B. I simply couldn't believe it. I stormed right out of that dealership!"

There are cheaper shotguns than that Beretta you saw. And there are far, far more expensive ones.

ArmedBear
March 19, 2010, 01:45 PM
I drive that thing in a blizzard without shoveling anything. i drove in rain storms . . . I could do none of those things in a Porshe.

Really?

We ran into some pretty nasty snowstorms on that drive, so I guess some people can. And you really can't drive a car in the rain? I've spun vehicles out in the rain, but they've invariably been pickups.

I say it's that too many care about their toys without much regard to anything else.


And you don't? Do you think anyone here gives a crap what kind of vehicle you drive or what alcohol you drink?

Which in my case -- and many others for the most part -- helps me sleep at night and I have something more than just my ---- in my hand when I hear a strange noise in the middle of the night.

Wait... You think a competition O/U is intended for home defense? That's like comparing a Swiss Army Knife to a surgeon's scalpel. Both useful, both knives, but not comparable in either direction.


And yeah, I DO get the point. You want to believe that you're better than other people, based on your choices in shotguns, cars and hard alcohol. You want affirmations of this from us, and you're frustrated that you aren't getting any. That makes you different from the most annoying sort of regular Nieman Marcus shopper in what way, exactly?

Robert
March 19, 2010, 02:11 PM
http://www.thehighroad.org/showpost.php?p=6167430&postcount=1
Or if you like we can compare buying a high end Beretta to a Harley Davidson.

Golden_006
March 19, 2010, 02:20 PM
And yeah, I DO get the point.

Ah no you don't. I keep going over the numbers again and again. I don't know if you know the difference between of 500% vs. 50% or what. If you're saying its a different class of gun and priced well all the other examples you gave didn't illustrate much.

Justin
March 19, 2010, 02:34 PM
The bottom line is this:

If a Maverick 88 does everything you want it to do, that's perfectly fine. Buy a Maverick 88 and have fun.

But there are people in this world who need something a bit more than a Maverick 88 because such a shotgun would be a poor choice for their intended use. Those people will buy shotguns that are not Maverick 88's, and such shotguns may cost a lot more than a Maverick 88. To those people who are spending that level of money, clearly the cost is worth it to them.

As a perfect example, I've got a Benelli M2 (http://www.thehighroad.org/showpost.php?p=6167198&postcount=71) that I've modified rather extensively for 3Gun. Am I being ridiculous because it cost 10x as much as a Maverick 88?

Golden_006
March 19, 2010, 02:43 PM
I have no idea. I did ask awhile back what a 10,000 dollar shotgun could do that a Remington can't and next thing we're talking about Ford v. Porshe. For all we know said gun could be more or less a substitute for going duck hunting with a 400 dollar Mossberg Country Squire with a better gold plated triger and dressed up wood. It sure looks it. and not really a competitive anything. From what I know about the area I wouldn't be surprised if I'm right.

Justin
March 19, 2010, 02:54 PM
I have no idea.

Really?

I did ask awhile back what a 10,000 dollar shotgun could do that a Remington can't and next thing we're talking about Ford v. Porshe.

Well, see, here's the problem. The number of people on THR who've got serious trigger time with, let alone own a shotgun that costs $10,000 is likely to be pretty small. I'd be surprised if we had more than four or five active members who own such guns. So for the rest of us, it's a matter of speculation when it comes to talking about such firearms.

I've had the pleasure of speaking with a couple of Olympic trap and skeet competitors. Guess what? All of their shotguns were easily some of the most expensive guns I've laid eyes on. Why are they expensive? Well, from what they told me, it has to do with the gun being customized to specifically fit their body, along with other things like how the barrels are regulated, and any number of other technical issues that would not even be a minor consideration to a shooter like you or I.

For all we know said gun could be more or less a substitute for going duck hunting with a 400 dollar Mossberg Country Squire and not really a competitive anything. From what I know about the area I wouldn't be surprised if I'm right.

Of course some people do buy such guns in order to have a status symbol. Perhaps it's a practice that's self-indulgent, but I hear that's one of the perks of being wealthy. It still doesn't change the fact that such a firearm is still going to be a fine example of craftsmanship.

Robert
March 19, 2010, 03:00 PM
I have shot a shotgun that was nearly $10,000. It was a beautiful 1937 Parker- Hale 12ga. It was truly a thing of beauty and well worth every penny. That being said I liked the heft and sturdiness of the Stevens I was using better. I found the Parker- Hale to be a little light for my taste.

ArmedBear
March 19, 2010, 03:04 PM
AFAIK the DT-10 that took that gold in Beijing has had well over 1,000,000 rounds through it. That makes it relatively cheap, for someone who will use it that much, since it didn't need to be replaced several times already. It's not fancy-looking, either. That's one thing a higher-end Beretta will do -- and it handles well enough to make shooting International Skeet just a hair easier. That edge is part what a competitor needs to win, because everyone else has a good gun, shoots about as well, and is trying just as hard.

The number of people on THR who've got serious trigger time with, let alone own a shotgun that costs $10,000 is likely to be pretty small.

True. There are plenty with $3-4000 guns, though. One round shooting any clay targets with one will clarify the difference between that and a Maverick 88. Not everyone has to care about that, or enjoy driving enough to want a sports car, or enjoy eating enough to go to a restaurant with a famous chef, or enjoy playing the piano enough to want a Boesendorfer, or like whisky enough to pay $100 for a good bottle -- or ANY of those things. It's just one's right to choose one's pleasures, and comparing anything higher-end with something cheap, based only on the price, is silly -- unless what you enjoy is proving to yourself that life can be as cheap as possible. People have done that, enjoyed it, and even written books about it. If that's your particular pleasure, have at it. But that doesn't make anyone better or worse for what they enjoy.

Justin
March 19, 2010, 03:07 PM
That's another good point. The people who are really wringing these things out have spent far more on ammunition than the cost of the gun.

AB, you're a lot more familiar with clay games than I am, what is it about these guns that confers an advantage that you wouldn't get with a more traditional gun?

ArmedBear
March 19, 2010, 03:15 PM
Balance, handling and precise feel, combined with ludicrous longevity.:)

The top American Skeet shooter rarely ever misses a target -- hundreds in a row. That's what it takes to win. The guys he beats ALSO rarely miss targets. Every little bit of physical or mental fatigue that can be removed from the equation by technique, training and equipment need to be removed, because if you don't do it, the next guy will, and will win.

He's been practicing, shooting and winning, and coaching others, with the same expensive Krieghoff for 20 years. Not the same model. The same gun. He did swap out the barrels a while back, because he wanted to go from 30" to 32" -- another subtle difference that matters only at his level. The previous 30" set did serve him for 15 years, though. All told, that gun was cheap. I have no idea exactly how many rounds we're talking about, but it has to be well into 7 figures.

When someone with cash to burn buys the same gun for the hell of it and shoots 100 rounds every couple of months, is it necessarily cost-effective in the same way? No way. But that's the buyer's choice, and not the gunmaker's fault.:)

ForumSurfer
March 19, 2010, 03:51 PM
Why does a shotgun cost $2k plus?

Simple, it's worth it. I have a few Remington 1100's. Definitely not cheapo guns. One belonged to my father since the early 70's. I've shot it to death, as has my father many family members. It could use some new seals and a new barrel. Great gun that has held up well.

I have a friend who shoots trap competitively. This guy goes through hundreds of rounds a month just to stay sharp. He spends thousands of dollars a year on just shotgun ammo. It takes a very high quality firearm to stand up to that kind of usage while remaining accurate and the action crisp. Even if you don't see any difference, once you actually pick one of these fine guns up and use it, the difference is there. Thousand's of rounds a year easily, yet the action remains crisp and the patterns are still tight. I've seen lesser guns degrade with much less usage even when meticulously cared for.

Aside from that, who are we to chastise their choice by saying an off the shelf brand X product is equal? The craftsmanship that goes into these weapons is remarkably astounding and you simply won't find it anywhere else. You don't see errant tool marks or blemishes. They aren't there. It is a beautiful piece of handmade art that is functional.

ForumSurfer
March 19, 2010, 04:04 PM
I have no idea exactly how many rounds we're talking about, but it has to be well into 7 figures.


Let's say that this gun has been fired 200,000 times in it's lifetime. That means it has been open and closed more than 150,000 times. Do that with a cheap over and under. The wood will crack, the action will stick or get sloppy or you'll feel some metal on metal grinding. The fact that these guns work for years and years with ridiculously heavy shooting is truly a testament to the gunsmiths that make these.

For those that don't believe, go to your local brand x store like gander mountain. Pick up an over/under that costs under $600, break it open and look at the action up close. Then grab that $2500 Beretta and do the same. Beretta is considered "low end" by many of these guys.

That being said...my 870 has been a faithful 17 year friend that suits my needs.

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