marlin 1894 css crossbolt safety question


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cire
March 18, 2010, 03:13 AM
I would like to get a 1894 css. I have read others buying older marlins to avoid the crossbolt safety. What is the disadvantage in having the crossbolt safety?

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R.W.Dale
March 18, 2010, 03:27 AM
I would like to get a 1894 css. I have read others buying older marlins to avoid the crossbolt safety. What is the disadvantage in having the crossbolt safety?

There isn't one.

It's just that old folks like to complain about new stuff. Any potential downside to the crossbolt safety can be negated with the application of a rubber O ring

mdThanatos
March 18, 2010, 03:42 AM
If its like mine, you can take it apart and tighten a screw to keep it locked in the "unsafe" position.

achildofthesky
March 18, 2010, 04:11 AM
As the others have stated, the CBS isn't bad. Sometimes operator error can happen but if you REALLY don't like it you and soft or hard disable it or replace it with a dummy screw like piece and there are saddle ring attachments for that thing if that grabs you.

Be safe
and BUY that rifle you will love it.
Patty

KodeFore
March 18, 2010, 04:59 AM
There is no disadvantage to it but since the gun already has has the 1/2 cock safety from the original design the cross bolt safety is redundant. The easiest solution is to leave it in the off position & ignore it. I do not see how it could cause any problems. If you're using the gun for competition & think it might get in your way, then you will probably want a smith to slick up the gun anyway & they could probably take care of that as well. Thats the way i see it at least.... have fun!

CajunBass
March 18, 2010, 05:01 AM
None I can think of, unless you just happen to enjoy having something to complain about or want an excuse to prowl gun shops and shows looking for a "good one". If you just want a rifle to shoot or go hunting with, one with a CBS is just as good.

billfrombyron
March 18, 2010, 05:01 AM
I like to use a number 0 packing over the crossbolt saftey.

Simple mod, and it hides the ugly saftey perfectly.

You can get them from any hardware store for about 5 cents a piece.

Most people just hate the way it looks from what I've seen. There maybe other reasons, but that's the number 1 reason for me.

-Bill

vaupet
March 18, 2010, 07:31 AM
I own a 336 and a 39a and i find no disadvantage.
It comes in handy when working on the rifle or when you want to dry fire for practice (espacially the 39 has a vulnerable firing pin)

Otherwise I leave it in the "unsafe" position

but I guess people like to complain because they don't like change

greetings

peter

SlamFire1
March 18, 2010, 11:05 AM
I have an older non cross bolt M1894 and a newer cross bolted M336

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v479/SlamFire/Rifles%20various/M1894FullLength.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v479/SlamFire/Rifles%20various/ReducedMarlin336fulllength.jpg

People just complain when things change. So do I, but sometimes change is for the better.

The crossbolt is a safety improvement. With the crossbolt safety applied you absolutely cannot discharge the rifle when lowering the hammer. Yes, it is possible to drop the hammer on the way to half cock.

I can dry fire the M336 without worrying about busting the firing pin because the cross bolt holds the hammer back. I think dry firing in essential to markmanship and I don't dry fire my M1894. Because my M1894 firing pin broke in pieces after dry firing.

Won't be long till Gunwriters will be pumping up the value of their pre cross Bolt Safety Marlins. Expect to read of their "legendary" status, the wonderful quality, and I expect they will coin a new classification of "Pre BS".

bhk
March 18, 2010, 11:36 AM
I leave my safely unlocked except when jacking cartridges through the action to unload the magazine. I think the safety greatly increases the safety of this operation.

Oic0
March 18, 2010, 01:25 PM
I like mine a lot. Half-cock is nice and all but safety is full proof. It doesn't change the look of the gun. It will occasionally make you look dumb though when you line up a shot, pull the trigger, and just get a CLICK!. 5 seconds later you go DOH safety! On other guns with safetys that stop the trigger you can save face ;)

DPris
March 18, 2010, 02:19 PM
The disadvantage skirted around but not outright mentioned above is that it tends to activate inadvertently.
It's more common among the cowboy action shooters who handle them a lot, but it's also happened to more than one hunter.
During the course of a match or bouncing around on a hunt, something comes in contact with the button & pushes it far enough in to activate it.
The shooter/hunter typically doesn't notice till it's time for a quick first shot, when the discovery causes either loss of time on the match stage or loss of a deer on the mountain.

It's the possibility of accidental activation that generates most of the negativity, and most of the O-ring & other approaches to de-activating or removing it.

Denis

cire
March 18, 2010, 02:48 PM
Thank you for the info. You have answered my question. I will be keeping me eyes open for one. One more thing any advise on what ammo to use. I will be shooting rabbits, cans, just plinking and having fun. Thanks again for the help

Maverick223
March 18, 2010, 03:36 PM
Any potential downside to the crossbolt safety can be negated with the application of a rubber O ring.Yep, then the only downside is the exorbitant weight and costliness of that rubber O-ring. :rolleyes: There are safety delete kits available, but I personally wouldn't spend the money on one when you can be done with it for $0.10 and 2sec.

:)

1858
March 18, 2010, 03:40 PM
I installed a safety replacement screw from Long Hunter (http://www.longhunt.com/gunparts/marlin.htm) in my '94 and will keep it that way. I also installed safety replacement screws in my two '95s but recently decided to put the factory safeties back. My reason for this was simple .... RECOIL!! I practice safe firearm handling so the muzzle is always pointing downrange or at least in the direction of the intended recepient of my lead. However, an AD with a hot-loaded .45-70 could do a significant amount of damage to me if the rifle wasn't shouldered properly. In fact, I'm fairly sure it could break fingers, wrists and possibly other bones.

My "technique" now when working up loads for the .45-70s is to open the action, apply the safety, insert a round, close the action, get in position, take off the safety and then fire when ready. Basically I'm a chicken and don't want to be "surprised" by an AD with these viscious beasts!! Obviously I keep my finger off the trigger until I'm ready to fire but I feel safer doing it this way. If I ever take the '95's hunting I will try to remember to take off the safety before squeezing the trigger, but if I don't, then maybe the elk will feel lucky that day.

:)

Dr T
March 18, 2010, 04:38 PM
I have a Marlin 1894 .44 mag and a Winchester Trapper Model 94 30-30 both with CBS. I would not have it otherwise.

About 45 years ago, a friend of mine was sitting in the front seat of a ranch pickup with a loaded 30-30 lever action with a shell in the chamber and the rifle on half cock safety. He was sitting there idling away the time, absentmindedly pulling on the trigger. After doing this for about 15 minutes, the safety slipped, the gun went off, a hole appeared in the roof of the pickup, and he got a case of powder burns and ringing ears.

It was an old gun, but the object lesson that the half cock safety might possibly slip has not been lost on me.

1858
March 18, 2010, 05:10 PM
About 45 years ago, a friend of mine was sitting in the front seat of a ranch pickup with a loaded 30-30 lever action with a shell in the chamber and the rifle on half cock safety. He was sitting there idling away the time, absentmindedly pulling on the trigger. After doing this for about 15 minutes, the safety slipped, the gun went off, a hole appeared in the roof of the pickup, and he got a case of powder burns and ringing ears.

It was an old gun, but the object lesson that the half cock safety might possibly slip has not been lost on me.

First off, your friend is/was a @#$%ing idiot and sounds like a prime candidate for the Darwin Award!! Second, if all you're doing is pulling the trigger (and nothing else), there's NO friggin' way with any properly designed rifle that the hammer will fall forward if set on half-cock. Look at the photos below showing half-cock vs. full-cock (Marlin '94 not a '95 as labelled). Sorry, but it ain't gonna happen!!

http://128.171.62.162/hawthorn-engineering/thr/marlin/marlin_safety_hammer.jpg

http://128.171.62.162/hawthorn-engineering/thr/marlin/marlin_safety_hammer(2).jpg

:)

Dr T
March 18, 2010, 05:38 PM
I always considered it a wonder that the guy survived to adulthood. And, the hammer/sear assembly was VERY, VERY worn. There is an old Remington Rolling Block 22 in the family that will do the same thing.

Given the age of the rifle (late 1800's - early 1900's), environment (lots of blowing dust and sand), use (heavy rough daily use on a ranch, carried on saddle and in pickup by a cowboy, not a hunter or marksman), maintenance (likely none), I suspect that the sear and safety notch were simply worn out through daily use. Metals and lubricants are a lot better now.

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