How important is it to clean a new gun before firing?


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Shpadoinkel
March 19, 2010, 08:19 AM
Reason I ask is that I just picked up my first hand/carry gun last night, a M&P9c.
I'm supposed to go to the range tonight right after work with the guys but I haven't had a chance to clean it from the factory yet. Actually, I don't even have a cleaning kit yet.

I've heard of people going right to the range from picking up a gun and having no problems, I just don't want to chance doing any permanent damage.

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usp9
March 19, 2010, 08:27 AM
Your pistol was fired at the manufacturer, so it is ready. Will you harm your new gun.... no, not really. However, is it a good idea to clean and lube a new pistol.... yes, it will give you a chance to become more familiar with it and make sure it is properly oiled. Depending on how long the gun sat on a shelf, the original lube may have dried or migrated.

Buy your cleaning kit first, then use it, then go shoot.

gwnorth
March 19, 2010, 08:36 AM
Some pistols come pretty slathered in oil/grease (eg. my CZ P-01 was covered in stuff), which is usually not an ideal lubricant but is usually something chosen primarily for it's corrosion resistance. It's nice to get rid of that at the least.

I also like to field strip, clean, inspect and then lube to my satisfaction. Plus, by inspecting everything carefully, I can have a heads up on any issues that I may want to take up under warranty (I've never actually had to do that, but I just think you'll do better with such issues if you notice and report on them promptly, not calling up customer care 6 months and 500 rounds later because of a burr on a slide rail or something).

AirForceShooter
March 19, 2010, 08:52 AM
Clean it!!!!!

AFS

heeler
March 19, 2010, 08:58 AM
My Diamondback was very dry from the factory.
Clean it and lube it.

Oscar 14
March 19, 2010, 09:15 AM
Can't speak about other mfgs. guns but when I got my M&P9c I took it out of the box inspected it with a bore light, racked the slide a dozen times, inserted both mags several times to make sure they were good. I found a light coating of lube on all the internals I coud see. I loaded the mags went out to my range and emptied them. Flawless. If looks or feels dry, lube it. Otherwise go shoot it and enjoy it. Best pistol I've ever owned. Gonna get an M&P 45 cause I think just having one M&P isn't enough.

parputt
March 19, 2010, 09:19 AM
Some 1911 manufactures instruct you to NOT disassemble and clean prior to shooting for the first time. I go with the manufactures recommendation in these situations. I know I probably never would have been able to put my Les Baer back together had I not shot it a few hundred rounds to loosen it up.

Rinspeed
March 19, 2010, 10:50 AM
I never worried about cleaning them but I always think it's a good idea to run a patch down the bore a couple times.

CajunBass
March 19, 2010, 11:07 AM
I've done both and it didn't seem to make much difference either way. It's probably a good idea to though.

Now military surplus, especially Soviet bloc stuff is different. You do want to clean them to get the cosmoline off/out.

Strahley
March 19, 2010, 11:09 AM
Always. Anyone should be able to find 10 minutes to do a quick field strip cleaning

Mike J
March 19, 2010, 11:14 AM
I have done it both ways also & never had a problem. I have seen someone post about finding metal shavings in a rifle on their first cleaning & many people post about their semi-autos not functioning properly until they cleaned the heavy goo some manufacturers pack new guns with. I think it is a good idea to clean first. It might avoid some frustation.

Lv4snobrdg
March 19, 2010, 11:38 AM
Follow the instructions in your manual. Research your particular weapon if the manual doesn't make it clear what to do for a break in. Break in is about "seating" the moving parts. Tearing it down can change the wear pattern and create stress points that can cause eventual failure.

My new Kimber came in a ziplock that was very oily. Per the suggestions I received on this board, I wiped it off, locked and loaded. Not supposed to disassemble for cleaning for 500, but I still lube it in the areas I can without tear down & I clean it as best I can without tearing it down til I hit that mark. Patch down the tube but nothing else I can't do with just a towel. Lube it up for next time.

Prolly get to tear her down next weekend. 500rds is like 4 hours at the range for me, I am lucky to get an hour a week.

sho'nuff
March 19, 2010, 11:38 AM
Just do it at the range. Bring a couple patches and a bit of oil should be good

moxie
March 19, 2010, 11:53 AM
Clean and lube it. I bought a brand new Ruger LCR yesterday. It had been fired at the factory of course, and if they cleaned it, it wasn't a thorough job. Barrel and chambers were dirty. Ejector rod was dirty and needed lube. Don't take a chance.

Tommygunn
March 19, 2010, 12:05 PM
Make sure you get any lube/preservative out of the barrel. I would clean it well and make sure it was lubricated as per instructions.

david_the_greek
March 19, 2010, 12:06 PM
Manufacturers instructions are trump, short of that I wouldn't worry too much. Clean it if you can, otherwise just make sure the barrel is clean and free of obstructions. Shoot away and have fun!

The Lone Haranguer
March 19, 2010, 03:07 PM
How important? Very. I've received new guns ranging from inside a plastic bag swimming in oil to bone dry. Others report thick white grease in every cavity and orifice. Packing oil or grease is only for rustproofing during shipping and sitting on a shelf and not intended to be proper lubrication for shooting. One exception to this is Glock's copper anti-sieze compound in the barrel and slide. If you try and shoot a gun in such conditions, you will probably encounter malfunctions that diminish your confidence in it.

dfjaws
March 19, 2010, 04:05 PM
Good or bad, I literally shot my gun RIGHT out of the box. First slide rack chambered a round, first magazine inserted was my first mag at the range. Worked flawlessly.

RVenick
March 19, 2010, 04:18 PM
The M&P's are very easy to field strip. If nothing else pickup a boresnake and a bottle of Hoppe #9 or some Remoil and run the boresnake thru the barrel and use a paper towel to clean the slide rails and get some oil back on them. This is a brand new gun and you want everything to break in properly.

Nick5182
March 19, 2010, 04:25 PM
I'd clean it. I've picked up guns before that are just absolutely slathered with packing grease. It's just a generally good idea to clean it and give it a once over when you get a new firearm.

NJGunOwner81
March 19, 2010, 07:51 PM
I wouldn't be worried so much about it being dirty ... I'd be more worried about lubrication like Heeler said. Make sure all the goodies inside are all lubed up ... no sense having metal rubbing on the first shot! Is it going to ruin your gun ... more than likely ... no but I just like having some piece of mind!

BTW, let us know how it shoots once you blow off a few!

Take Care & Be Safe!

Frank
NJGunOwner81

MICHAEL T
March 19, 2010, 08:52 PM
Can't speak about other mfgs. guns but when I got my M&P9c I took it out of the box inspected it with a bore light, racked the slide a dozen times, inserted both mags several times to make sure they were good. I found a light coating of lube on all the internals I coud see. I loaded the mags went out to my range and emptied them. Flawless. If looks or feels dry, lube it. Otherwise go shoot it and enjoy it. Best pistol I've ever owned. Gonna get an M&P 45 cause I think just having one M&P isn't enough.

+1 lube it make sure barrel clear and shoot

Average Joe
March 19, 2010, 10:08 PM
It was test fired at the factory, so its already dirty. If you have time, run a patch through it, if not shoot it, and clean when you get home....

Shpadoinkel
March 19, 2010, 10:31 PM
Well, I of course did what most people told me not to... I fired it without cleaning.
In looking it over as best I could it looked to actually be in ready to fire shape. No thick grease, good light coating of oil in all the right places.

Fired 100 flawless rounds of target Winchester (that's all I had).
In a perfect world I absolutely would have cleaned it first, but circumstances didn't allow it. Barely made it to the range in time as is.
I'll spend a good amount of time cleaning it inside and out tomorrow.

REAPER4206969
March 20, 2010, 12:37 AM
It was test fired at the factory, so its already dirty.
That was before it was dunked in preservative oil/grease and stored for however long in a distributor/dealer warehouse. Also, not all firearms are test fired. Anyone who has bought a new Marlin can attest to all the metal shavings and preservative grease in the action.

The Bushmaster
March 20, 2010, 11:42 AM
Clean it!!!

sideways
March 20, 2010, 02:38 PM
came in a ziplock that was very oily. Per the suggestions I received on this board, I wiped it off, locked and loaded. Not supposed to disassemble for cleaning for 500, but I still lube it in the areas I can without tear down & I clean it as best I can without tearing it down til I hit that mark. Patch down the tube but nothing else I can't do with just a towel. Lube it up for next time.

You need to look at Kimber manual again I own serveral Kimbers and every manual says in RED BOLD LETTERS clean and lube before firing.

grimjaw
March 20, 2010, 03:37 PM
Even though it may not be strictly necessary it's not a bad idea to clean it anyway.

Ask me and my former Remington 870 how I know.

jm

Owen
March 20, 2010, 03:53 PM
I'd punch the bore out, just to make sure there aren't any metal chips, dust, spiders, etc. in there.

Hatterasguy
March 20, 2010, 03:58 PM
A lot of guns are covered in grease before they ship them, so you would want to clean that off.

I pull apart and go through every new gun I get, I want to remove the shipping grease and make sure nothing is wrong. Manufactures make mistakes, I don't want it coming apart in my hands.

jeepguy
March 20, 2010, 11:03 PM
i have done both but i prefer to clean first now. if i was in your situation i would just inspect relly well & work the slide, if everything looked good i would feel confident at least with a new gun.

makarovnik
March 21, 2010, 03:46 AM
Important. Helps you familiarize yourself with its manufacture and operation. Also you can see the inside before you start sending rounds downrange and you will be lubing it which is all good.

JDGray
March 21, 2010, 09:10 AM
I always inspect mine before shooting. A new pistol should function out of the box, unless it was oiled or greased to last a 100yrs on a shelf. But you wont know that unless you look inside. You also won't know unless you look at it before shooting, if something happened to it while you were shooting it, or if it came that way. Like someone mentioned, a burr forming on the slide, as one did on my Keltec P11. I knew it wasn't there before, so it happened while I was shooting. That KT is long gone, not keeping a gun arround that wears that easily:scrutiny:

JamesKelly
March 21, 2010, 06:01 PM
Clean any oil or whatever lube out of the chamber.
Lubrication in chambers means higher pressures. Not good.

as already been said, make sure the barrel has no gobs of grease in the bore.

Leafy Cronmer
March 22, 2010, 04:24 AM
I agree with most of the others, I would prefer to clean and lube a new gun before going to the range.

If I was in your situation personally I would at least give it some Break Free before going to the range if you have no time for a complete cleaning.

harmon rabb
March 22, 2010, 07:57 AM
took my g27 out of the box, loaded the mags, and began blasting away. no issues. :D

natman
March 22, 2010, 08:12 AM
At the very least, clean the bore. I detail strip and lube all my new guns. Even the high end brands are sometimes full of metal chips, machining dust and dirt. Almost all are sparsely lubed.

I once pushed a 20" long cylinder of red grease out of the bore of a new Zastava Mini-Mauser 223. I was REALLY glad I cleaned that one first.

Arthur2001
March 22, 2010, 10:26 AM
When I bought my Glock 19, I fired more then 100 rounds without cleaning the grease. No problem at all. But the copper dust was so sticky when I cleaned. Thus in order to keep clean, de- greasing is important.
Please note that G 19 has only 34 components, which might reduce the chance of any failure due to the dirtynes.

wally
March 22, 2010, 12:04 PM
Unless its oozing oil or cosmoline, I just run a patch through the bore to be sure its not obstructed or fouled and start shooting. I'm not big on cleaning guns that don't need it just to "feel good".

Even the high end brands are sometimes full of metal chips, machining dust and dirt. Name names! If I ever got one it'd go straight back! Implies a total lack of QA/QC.

--wally.

Lv4snobrdg
March 22, 2010, 12:18 PM
At the very least, clean the bore. I detail strip and lube all my new guns. Even the high end brands are sometimes full of metal chips, machining dust and dirt. Almost all are sparsely lubed.By detail strip do you mean pins and springs out?
I have bought a couple new guns, one "high end", haven't seen any filings. I would disagree since the vast majority of guns are built then the finish applied as a final, pre-assembly, step. No one is painting/parkering/bluing a piece full of shavings. Sorry partner.

Mad Magyar
March 22, 2010, 05:33 PM
By detail strip do you mean pins and springs out?

I wouldn't go that far....I strip every new pistol for familiarity and generously lube the moving parts. This way, if it FTF, I really go berserk with the mfrg..:)
I recall Jerry Ahern, then CEO of Detonics, claim the reason his pistols failed out of the box was all operator: Bad ammo, Bad Maintenance, and Limp Wristing..
What a guy....:rolleyes:

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