Do you weigh individual charges?


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R.W.Dale
March 22, 2010, 12:38 AM
Simple question (see poll) Do you feel compelled to weigh each and every charge for whatever reason or do you consider the practice to be a waste of time and energy. Or is your view of the matter neither.

Speaking for myself once I acquired a quality powder measure I phased out weighing individual charges rather quickly with any and all propellants. In the process of doing this if anything my groups have gotten better and better.

IME a good powder measure operated with a good well practiced technique can throw charges of even extruded powders darn near inside the margin of accuracy all but the most expensive reloading scales.

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Damon555
March 22, 2010, 12:46 AM
It depends.


If I'm loading varmint or target rifle loads I'll measure every one. If I'm loading bulk I just use the powder thrower and check every 10th round or so.

ScratchnDent
March 22, 2010, 12:51 AM
For rifles, I weigh each charge. I usually only load 20 rifle cartridges in a sitting, and it takes just as long to get my measure set up and throwing consistent charges a it does to just individually weigh them all.

For handguns I use the measure and do large batches.

bds
March 22, 2010, 01:28 AM
For pistol -

When starting a session on the progressive press, I measure first 1-3 charges to:
1. Make sure I got the right charge disk/hole on the Lee Auto Disk
2. Make sure the charges are consistent (hopper and disk are fully primed)

When loading my test rounds (10 of each powder charge) to make sure I got the exact 0.2-0.3 grain increments.

parker51
March 22, 2010, 01:59 AM
I weigh every charge for rifles and since I haven't loaded any pistol in several years I answered "yes" to the survey. I have a Dillon 550 and when I start reloading pistol again I will weigh every 10th round once I have it set.

bubbinator
March 22, 2010, 02:29 AM
I set my measure to drop the charge very close to spec, then trickle the last couple .10s of a grain in on rifle ammo. It is worth it, given all the other time spent on case prep. Loads prove the effort worth the time. Pistol loads, depends on the caliber. It seems to pay off too. I once won a bet with a neighbor about handloads V. factory ammo when I shot a better group @ 100 yds w/ my Ruger Super Blackhawk handload than he did with a Winchester .308 w/ a 4X scope and factory ammo!

wankerjake
March 22, 2010, 02:42 AM
Rifle yes, pistol no.

R.W.Dale
March 22, 2010, 03:07 AM
Rifle yes, pistol no.
This seems to be the trend

BUT IMO it's completely backwards if you're worried about variations in the amount of powder dispensed.

Lets assume a nice simple + or - .1grain variation or 0.2 total

of a 50grn rifle charge 0.2 grains represents little less than HALF of one percent of the total charge.

but for a 4.4grn 9mm charge that same 0.2 can make your charges vary by almost 4.5%

So logically if a person were to be worried about throwing charges they would be much more reluctant to do so on handgun rounds long before rifle cartridges

wolfeyes
March 22, 2010, 03:45 AM
For rifles always...............JH

Afy
March 22, 2010, 06:18 AM
For target rifles yes. And cross check every 5th wieght on a different scale.
For plinking ammo and pistol, I use the Lee Dippers. Just goes quicker. I will however wiegh every 10th or so round to make sure I am throwing a safe charge. If it isnt in a safe range, I will rethrow powder for all the cases between the current out of spec case, and the last in spec case.
Piror to seating (normally lots of 100) I will randomly slect 10 cases to wiegh to ensure I am safe.
Over cautious... maybe but its easer to re-throw powder than to try and re-grow a limb.

NotSoFast
March 22, 2010, 06:31 AM
on what I'm doing.

If I'm loading a proven handgun load, I'll check a few at the beginning to verify the powder is dropping correctly. THen I'll reweigh it every 50 rounds.

If it is a new handgun load, I'll measure each charge.

For a proven rifle load, I usually measure each load to start, then every tenth time, just to be sure. I also check each case before I seat the bullet to make sure the charge looks consistent.

And for a new load, as for the handgun, I will measure each charge.

Randy1911
March 22, 2010, 06:47 AM
I load on a progressive. I wiegh the first 5 to comfirm that they are consistant. Then I weigh about every 50 or so. I'm not interested in tack driving accuracy, just plinking.

mcdonl
March 22, 2010, 06:52 AM
I do. I am a newbie and do not want to find out the hard way what a grain or two off will cause.

Walkalong
March 22, 2010, 07:27 AM
No.

The only time charges need to be weighed is when you are shooting 1000 yards and beyond where ES & SD numbers are so critical. (This is what I am told by folks who shoot 1000 yards) I have nowhere to shoot over 300 yards right now, and weighing charges will make zero difference there.

I just throw and go. None of the 300 yard and in Benchrest shooters weigh charges. (Well, there might be a couple out there)

AC

army_husbandky
March 22, 2010, 07:50 AM
I weigh all my charges, I like to try and shoot to improve my shooting ability, so why wouldn't I want to make sure that I got exactly what I want when I go and shoot. I also look at reloading as a hobby, I kinda like my hobbies to take some time, so I go ahead and slow it down and weigh all my charges.

qajaq59
March 22, 2010, 08:03 AM
For the rifles? Yup!

Hangingrock
March 22, 2010, 08:04 AM
Weighing every charge would negate the usage of a progressive loader. Reloading for the 45ACP, 44Spl, 38Spl, and 9mmX19 if it can’t be done with W231 and a progressive reloader I’m not doing it. I check the powder measure dispensing charge weight periodically during a reloading session. I’ve established a tolerance of plus or minus “X” for the charge weight.

As for loading the .223Rem for across the course shooting I utilize “Commercial Processed & Primed Cases”. The powder charge (Rx15) is dispensed with a Redding measure and the bullets seated with a Redding competition bullet seating die. I see no advantage of weighing individual charges for 200yd & 300yd lines. The same maybe said for the 500yd/600yd lines with in reason but most of my shooting is now done on short courses.

With IMR powders a Belding & Mull measure is employed with example cartridges such as the 308Win or 30-06.

nm3
March 22, 2010, 08:20 AM
I do for my .40 pistol, as all I have is a digital scale with a powder dispenser. Currently new to reloading.

Afy
March 22, 2010, 08:37 AM
I just throw and go. None of the 300 yard and in Benchrest shooters weigh charges. (Well, there might be a couple out there)


I believe almost everyone winning is weighing their charges...

halfded
March 22, 2010, 08:37 AM
Yup. It started as paranoia but is now just a habit. I've developed a little "system" that speeds the process a bit. When I hang the pan on the scale (Lee balance scale, forget the name) I line up the indicator with the level mark so it takes less time for the scale to stop moving. I have what I've come to know as "acceptable wobble" which is nothing more than knowing the indicators back and forth travel and recognizing when it stays within acceptable (.1 grain) parameters. Any small additions are made by tapping powder from a Lee scooper.

Using my method, I can load 50 cases in about 15 minutes, give or take due to my accuracy with the powder measure.

shenck
March 22, 2010, 09:20 AM
If a powder meters well (w748 blc2 ect.), I check every fith one. If it's a powder like Imr 4350 or Imr 3031 I throw a light charge and trickle in the rest on the scale.

Uncle Billy
March 22, 2010, 09:38 AM
I "tare" my digital scale with the primed case, throw the charge and weigh it again- the reading the second time is the weight of powder in the case. I'll do it this way for the entire batch if:

I'm loading Unique, which is a pain in the pratt to meter accurately because of its shape.

The load is small, like for .22 Hornet or anytime when the error in my measure's accuracy approaches 1% or 2% or more of the load.

tehweej
March 22, 2010, 09:48 AM
+1 what Damon555 said. That is exactly what I do. Plinking=every 10th, precision/hunting= every one.

The Bushmaster
March 22, 2010, 09:58 AM
Yes...I freaky that way. If it goes into a case, it has been weighed on a RCBS powder Pro or RCBS 5-0-5...

R.W.Dale
March 22, 2010, 11:23 AM
I believe almost everyone winning is weighing their charges...
You'd be wrong

many benchresters load by the number of clicks on a harrels powder measure with total disreguard to charge weight

howlnmad
March 22, 2010, 11:25 AM
All rifle rounds I load get weighed individually (thanks to my chargemaster). If I'm loading plinking rounds, then no. I have my Lil Dandy for those and check about every twenty. Home defense loads do get weighed each time tho.

jcwit
March 22, 2010, 11:26 AM
In the summer I do casual Benchrest Shooting, no comptition, just friendly shooting with a couple of friends. These I weigh with a scale, any thing other than that my Pro Auto Disk for handgun rounds and my powder measures for rifle rounds.

I do use the scale for start-up and every so often during charging. Have never found where the checking as I go did anything as nothing ever changes.

JimKirk
March 22, 2010, 11:56 AM
I'll weigh enough charges to be sure that my Uniflow in throwing what I want, pistol or rifle. With rifle, I'll weigh every 5th or 10th round, depending on what I'm loading. With pistol, I'll weigh every 15th to 20th round, depending on the powder I using. With fine powders, I could check the first 2 and the last 2 and be ok, because my Uniflow will be dead on with it. With a long stick powder like IMR 7828, if I cut a grain, I just dump it back and throw another one. I try not to let anything distract me while charging my cases. All charges are checked on a "check weight" tested RCBS scale.

Jimmy K

Tom S.
March 22, 2010, 11:58 AM
As you can see by the answers you are getting, the poll is pretty useless.

Weighing every charge on a progressive press that is loading cases below maximum charges is a waste of time (unless you're using a Lee Pro 1000 :neener: ). I only weigh every charge if I'm loading at or near maximum, which is not very often.

Scrapperz
March 22, 2010, 12:41 PM
If I'm loading 460 S&W Mag & 454 Casull I weigh each one and it really doesn't take long with a good system. When I load 9mm Luger, 40 S&W, and 45 Colt Cowboy loads I use the Lyman 55 Powder Measure unless I'm doing something specific like working up a new load.

rklessdriver
March 22, 2010, 12:52 PM
I check pistol rounds every 10 rnds.

I weigh every rifle charge.
Will

HOWARD J
March 22, 2010, 01:03 PM
If I make a test load I weigh each one.
If I load a standard load I weigh every tenth one.
B/fore I retired I weighed every 50th round+/-
Shot shells--I weigh every 30th round +/-.....................:)

I use an RCBS powder measure--very accurate.

Iloadntie
March 22, 2010, 02:19 PM
I weigh to set up my Uniflow and always at the start of a session and to check in-between, but rarely is there a variation...Check with a 505

Scott

Walkalong
March 22, 2010, 05:50 PM
I believe almost everyone winning is weighing their charges..
You'd be wrong

many benchresters load by the number of clicks on a harrels powder measure with total disreguard to charge weight
Right.

It started with the Culver conversions on the Lyman 55 measures. We never talked about what weight we were shooting, just how many clicks. No one I saw weighed any charges at a match. Adjust a click up or down etc, but no weighing, just check it on target. AC

Rollis R. Karvellis
March 22, 2010, 06:21 PM
My match loads yes becuse I, use a Lyman DPS scale. the reguler plinking load's get check at the start, and finish. These are done on a 650. I have loaded on the 650 using the same scale, it went preaty quick.

Ridgerunner665
March 22, 2010, 06:28 PM
As an accuracy buff who is in no hurry and likes knowing the exact charge (safety)....I weigh each and every one

Lee Roder
March 22, 2010, 06:39 PM
Yes, to reduce flinch :D

bobelk99
March 22, 2010, 07:53 PM
Weight each for load development or testing.
Weight every 20th for rifle.
Weight every 50th for pistol.

If you need to routinely weigh each charge, you need a better powder measure.

Visionz45
March 22, 2010, 10:18 PM
I weigh every rifle charge and use a spoon/digital scale. I enjoy reading really consistent chrono results. It's really slow though.

Seedtick
March 22, 2010, 11:02 PM
I'm a sometimer. I weigh every charge in load development and I weigh every hunting round.

If I find an accurate load that is just under a charge that has shown signs of high pressure I weigh each load. But mostly in a situation such as that I'll just find a different load that's not so close to the edge.

ST

:)

StretchNM
March 22, 2010, 11:08 PM
I weigh each charge. The only pistol ammo I reload is .44mag, and that's for a Marlin lever. They get weighed too.

wrench
March 22, 2010, 11:29 PM
If I'm working up a load for rifle, I weigh every one, and trickle the last little bit in. Seems faster to me when only loading 5-10r of each weight.
Once I have a load, I weigh maybe the first 5-10 to make sure my powder measure is set right, then throw and go.
Pistol? Weigh the first 5-10 to check the powder measure, then away we go.

1SOW
March 22, 2010, 11:51 PM
I answered 'NO'.

Building the HANDGUN load, I weigh the first few drops and watch/verify "EVERY" powder drop from the Lee Pro-Disc system.

If a case doesn't look filled to the level I expect, I check it--rare.

It's boringly reliable and accurate with the powder I use.

Arkansas Paul
March 23, 2010, 12:25 AM
Rifle - Every single one.
.45 Colt - Didn't at first, but had accuracy trouble. Now measure every one.
Other pistol - One about every 10-15

Whalen7840
March 23, 2010, 01:59 AM
How much of a pain is it to use the RCBS digital dispenser/ scale combo? I'm considering picking up the Cabela's kit with that included for the single stage.. is it a waste of time?

wankerjake
March 23, 2010, 02:16 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by wankerjake
Rifle yes, pistol no.

This seems to be the trend

BUT IMO it's completely backwards if you're worried about variations in the amount of powder dispensed.

Lets assume a nice simple + or - .1grain variation or 0.2 total

of a 50grn rifle charge 0.2 grains represents little less than HALF of one percent of the total charge.

but for a 4.4grn 9mm charge that same 0.2 can make your charges vary by almost 4.5%

So logically if a person were to be worried about throwing charges they would be much more reluctant to do so on handgun rounds long before rifle cartridges
Measuring accuracy is totally different between rifles and pistols (at least for what I do) so a .2gr difference in the 9mm cartridge is negligent when you're shooting off hand at ten yards fairly quickly at a ten inch circle, compared to shooting a rifle from a bench rest at a 1" circle at 200 yards...percentage-wise it is a bigger difference but there are a bunch of other factors that make it matter less. However, as it has been pointed out, I guess it doesn't really matter out of a rifle either. It's just that I didn't find this out until recently and I don't have a powder measure that will throw large enough charges for my rifles, so I weight each one in a scale.

GMFWoodchuck
March 23, 2010, 08:50 AM
I just bought my Uniflow. So for a few shooting sessions, I'll only be doing every 10th or so. Till I get my fix anyways...

henry-ctc
March 23, 2010, 09:06 AM
Yes. Itīs a nice step of reloading. In adition I use a powder in flakes wich doesnīt measure very well. It takes time, but I like to spend it that way.

chriske
March 23, 2010, 09:25 AM
No, but once my powder measure is set, I check charge weight every 15 or so reloaded rounds;

MCgunner
March 23, 2010, 09:29 AM
Not with handguns. With rifles, i'll check about every 5th round. I've never seen that powder measure go off, though. I'm not sure it's really necessary, but I ain't THAT lazy and a digital balance makes it easy.

Handguns, I use a Lee auto disc. You can't change the disc volume by any small increment. I never had a problem and I've been using it for 25 years.

WNTFW
March 23, 2010, 12:10 PM
On rifle I weigh every charge only during load development because it is easier to throw a slighty low charge & trickle up to the weight.

Once I settle on a load I throw the charge, verify and spot check. I don't weigh every load if it is a large amount of rounds. If it is only 10 or 20 I might weigh every charge. I weigh less often the more I have used the load.

When I first start on any new equipment or powder I tend to weight more loads. As I begin to trust myself and my equipment I weigh less frequently. I do visually check powder levels in the case. As an example I used to worry about powder level in the powder measure more than I do now. I know it will be accurate even with low levels of the powders I use.

The frequency I weigh depends on several factors.

farscott
March 23, 2010, 12:46 PM
For me, it depends on the round and its intended usage. For pistol ammo for carry gun proficiency, I do not weigh every round. For bullseye ammo, I weigh every round. For small rifle rounds like the .22 K-Hornet and .17 Fireball, I weigh every charge because load variation with these small cases can be a very bad thing. For my .243 Winchester deer rifle, I weigh every round because I only load ten rounds per year.

243winxb
March 23, 2010, 01:11 PM
No Till you know your equipment well, check each and every powder drop and how each powder type behaves. Then spot check after that. With Alliant Bullseye, put 10 drops in the pan to get an average. If your loading 3.8 grs, you want 10 to weight no more than a total of 38grs. Unique needs a double tap at the filling stage. IMR 4350, if you feel the measure cut , that one goes back into the hopper. Use a funnel as a baffle in top of the powder measure if needed. :scrutiny: Look into each case to see if the powder level looks the same in all when in a loading block. With a Dillon, i sit so i can see the powder level in each case before seating a bullet. (RL-450)

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