Dude secures guns in safe, and they steal his safe!


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harmonic
March 23, 2010, 04:35 PM
A Tulsa man returns home from a fishing trip to find numerous guns and large amount of cash missing.

The homeowner returned to his home on the 5100 block of East 27th Place to find his 500 pound safe missing.

Inside the safe were 22 pistols, rifles and shotguns along with $200,000 in cash.

The money, which belonged to a close friend, was partly inherited and was to provide for the families retirement years.

The burglary took place while the homeowner was away on an out-of-state fishing trip between March 3 and March 12th.

Detectives on the case are hoping that a citizen will call Crime Stoppers at 596-COPS with any information that they have in reference to this burglary.

http://www.ktul.com/news/stories/0310/718670.html

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harmonic
March 23, 2010, 04:36 PM
Guaranteed was someone homeowner knows. Plus, if one's safe isn't properly secured, it just becomes a big gun case.

rcmodel
March 23, 2010, 04:40 PM
Thats why you bolt safes down & weld the nuts on!

I have a dealer/collector friend who not only had a 1,500 pound safe full of single digit serial number Ruger #1 rifles stolen.
It also contained all the bolts out of about a dozen Kimber of Oregon rifles with single digit serial numbers & exhibition grade stocks.
Kimber is long out of business, and replacement bolts are not to be had.

That was 10 years ago, and still nothing has ever been recovered.

rc

19-3Ben
March 23, 2010, 04:42 PM
Guaranteed was someone homeowner knows.
Agreed.


That absolutely sucks though. $200k is a LOT to have sitting around in a safe at home. I'd have that in a safety deposit box in a bank if I had that much.

waldonbuddy
March 23, 2010, 04:49 PM
You do know that the gov. can, under certain circumstances, open and take whatever is in your safe deposit box.

http://amateurassetallocator.com/2008/07/29/is-your-safety-deposit-box-really-safe/

19-3Ben
March 23, 2010, 04:52 PM
Wasn't aware of that. The bank is private property, as is the box. Under what authority can the govt do that? What "certain circumstances" allow this?

EmGeeGeorge
March 23, 2010, 04:59 PM
Like a criminal indictment, a search warrant, a seizure warrant... Not very likely unless you or yours are doing something that is illegal.
Also in certain situations the government can kill you with a hellfire from a drone.... Like if you're an Al Qaida member in Pakistan... Probably just as likely as them opening a legally leased safe-deposit...

JohnBT
March 23, 2010, 04:59 PM
So they can't take stuff if it's in your home or buried in the yard? :confused:

TexasRifleman
March 23, 2010, 05:03 PM
The bank is private property, as is the box. Under what authority can the govt do that? What "certain circumstances" allow this?

With probable cause the IRS can sieze cash in a safe deposit box until you can prove any taxes owed have been paid. It happens quite often.

$200,000 cash would convince most judges to sign a warrant I suspect.

Which leads back to rule #1, don't tell people what you put in your safe :)

stonecutter2
March 23, 2010, 05:04 PM
You do know that the gov. can, under certain circumstances, open and take whatever is in your safe deposit box.

http://amateurassetallocator.com/2008/07/29/is-your-safety-deposit-box-really-safe/
The circumstances required seem to be really rare. Mistakes happen.

cassandrasdaddy
March 23, 2010, 05:07 PM
200 k in a cheap safe? why does my spidey sense tingle

a1abdj
March 23, 2010, 05:22 PM
I can assure you that a 500 pound safe is not the proper safe for $200K worth of anything, let alone cash. A 1 cubic foot safe with the proper rating for that type of cash would weigh around 700 pounds. A safe large enough for guns with the proper rating would weigh closer to 5,000 pounds.

Gun safes are called gun safes for a reason. Contrary to what BS the manufacturer spews, they should not be used for valuables or cash.

heeler
March 23, 2010, 05:37 PM
I agree with a1abdj 100 per cent on this one.
I would not be able to walk out the door of my home with 200 k in cash sitting in a 500 pound 12 gauge safe.
With that much money a small TL-30 safe could have been purchased and secured.
Those thieves hit the jack pot with that heist.
Dont you necessarily believe that thieves knew the home owner cause this BS happens each and every day in all 50 states in this country.
It's constant.
Good neighborhoods and bad.
It's constant.

CoRoMo
March 23, 2010, 05:44 PM
Yep, 1% of that cash could have bought all the security he would have needed.

Hope they find the scum that did this... of course... he could be involved with the "theft" himself.:scrutiny:

Dravur
March 23, 2010, 06:09 PM
With that kind of cash in my safe, I would never leave the house.... I would be sitting in front of my safe...AR in hand... stroking the safe and saying "myyy presciousssss"

huntsman
March 23, 2010, 06:54 PM
Which leads back to rule #1, don't tell people what you put in your safe

And don’t put all your eggs in one basket.


Unless it was HIS intent to have it all come up missing. Hmmmmmmmm.

danprkr
March 23, 2010, 06:58 PM
Not very likely unless you or yours are doing something that is illegal.

You need to google RICO abuses. Trust me, they steal from us all the time.

The Lone Haranguer
March 23, 2010, 07:07 PM
Anyone can steal anything if they have enough time and determination. Bolting the safe to the floor beams and/or wall studs might have prevented this ... or might not. A 500-lb. safe can be moved easily with two strong men and an appliance dolly. Even if someone saw them, they might just assume they were legitimate movers. (In some neighborhoods I've lived in, the neighbors might even help. :mad:)

DoubleTapDrew
March 23, 2010, 07:31 PM
I wonder if he (or his "close friend") had $200k he didn't want anyone to know about, like IRS, DEA, or another alphabet soup agency.
I wouldn't trust any RSC with that kind of cash.

padd54
March 23, 2010, 08:01 PM
This is almost like the day I lost all my guns in a boating accident.

FIVETWOSEVEN
March 23, 2010, 08:08 PM
Shouldn't put a gun safe full of guns on a rowboat eh?

Blackbeard
March 23, 2010, 08:22 PM
along with $200,000 in cash.

Well there's yer problem. Odds are he told too many people about it, too.

LRS_Ranger
March 23, 2010, 08:37 PM
Hmm.. I too smell a rat. They had to know what they were going for, because they waited till he was gone for an extended period and then took the required equipment to take the safe, and were gone with it. Your average burgler looking for silver and your wife's pearls isn't going to be prepared for that level of heist. I have a feeling that if he wasn't in on it, he said too much too loud in IHOP one morning, and that was that. Also, the prospect of 200K could turn a "friend" real fast. Seems real fishy at best.

supernac
March 23, 2010, 08:39 PM
Good luck getting the $200,000 back.

Zack
March 23, 2010, 08:50 PM
Who would keep 200k in their home? and go on a trip! I would have had it in a vault.

Cosmoline
March 23, 2010, 08:54 PM
With a good collection it's worth while to hire builders to make the safe part of the house itself.

19-3Ben
March 23, 2010, 09:12 PM
This is almost like the day I lost all my guns in a boating accident.

Yeah but thanks to you, those are some bada$$ trout in that river now!!!

Vonderek
March 23, 2010, 09:50 PM
Seems way to coincidental to be a random burglary.

1) One or both guys blabbed about what was in the safe

or

2) Guy who inherited money needs to find a new friend he can trust and/or buy his own safe next time. I think the "friend" may be the rat.

al123
March 23, 2010, 11:55 PM
When you inherit that amount of money, it's just plain stupid to have it in cash in what essentially is a glorified steel cabinet. Even if one had a top rated safe, home invasion would become a real threat. People have been murdered over much less.

Regardless, something just doesn't sound right. Maybe more will come out later.

Zoidberg523
March 24, 2010, 12:33 AM
Like a criminal indictment, a search warrant, a seizure warrant... Not very likely unless you or yours are doing something that is illegal.

Now, now, you should always click on the link and read what is being discussed before commenting (lol). :neener:

Texas Gun Person
March 24, 2010, 02:10 AM
Homeowner wanted the money. So, someone "stole" his safe.

Mr. Bojangles
March 24, 2010, 08:10 AM
Something does indeed smell fishy.......

bababooey32
March 24, 2010, 09:19 AM
Kimber is long out of business, and replacement bolts are not to be had.


:confused: Huh?

Kimber's current website (http://www.kimberamerica.com) complete with "New for 2010" section.

19-3Ben
March 24, 2010, 09:31 AM
I think he means the original Kimber from Oregon that was founded in the late 1970s.

Kimber as we know it is a product of the 1990s. Not that it's a bad thing. I don't mean this to bash the company.

wishin
March 24, 2010, 10:00 AM
I wonder if he (or his "close friend") had $200k he didn't want anyone to know about, like IRS, DEA, or another alphabet soup agency.
I wouldn't trust any RSC with that kind of cash.
My thoughts exactly..............

PT1911
March 24, 2010, 10:06 AM
I just cannot imagine keeping that sort of money around.... maybe a grand at most for JUST IN CASE CASH, but even that would be a stretch...who in their right mind keeps 200 grand in the house... More to the point.. WHO THE HELL lets a friend keep their 200 grand at their house while they go on a little trip?

Finprof
March 24, 2010, 11:18 AM
About six months ago, one of my neighbors had his safe stolen with his coin collection inside. The coin collection was worth about $500,000. It was in a really heavy-duty safe with inch-thick steel sides bolted into a concrete pad built for the safe in a room adjacent to the garage on ground level. The room was built on the garage floor and the bolts extended through 8 inches of concrete. The safe was put in while the concrete was still wet. He also had a fancy electronic alarm for the house. The thieves used a jackhammer to get the safe out of the concrete floor while my neighbor was on vacation. Obviously they new what they were looking for.

I have another neighbor with a 1934 Bugatti in his garage. His is worried about it being stolen as well along with his 4 other collector cars.

PT1911
March 24, 2010, 11:26 AM
heavy-duty safe with inch-thick steel sides bolted into a concrete pad built for the safe in a room adjacent to the garage on ground level.

The only thing he could have effectively done differently is change the bold portion!... If at all possible a heavy ass safe should be put below ground level... they may break up the concrete or any number of other things, but unless the come in with a cutting torch or the like, they are going to have a hell of a time hauling that safe up the stairs...

When all is said and done, however, if a thief is good at what they do, they will get what they want if they get in.. your best bet is a mix of alarms, locks, animals, and friends.... on top of making it awfully difficult for them to get what they want if they do get in.

Kingcreek
March 24, 2010, 11:46 AM
A few years ago a well known gun collector/enthusiest in Iowa came home to find a large gaping hole in the back of his house where someone had kicked his back door open, strung chain or cable through his house and pulled a good-sized safe out and long gone away. There remained a significant amount of his walls and door framing strewn about his yard and driveway.

ForumSurfer
March 24, 2010, 12:29 PM
...one of my neighbors...coin collection was worth about $500,000...another neighbor with a 1934 Bugatti in his garage...

:what:
Sounds like a nice neighborhood!

gym
March 24, 2010, 12:34 PM
This guy wasn't too bright. Very few people keep that kind of cash in the house. If he told just one person, then that was the beginning of the end. Unless he had an armed gaurd and a safe poured into cement with a bank vault door and a security system from a James Bond movie, it was bound to happen. Cameras would have helped, video streamed to an off premisses facility, but he may not have wanted the exposure if he was up to something. He could have split it up into several safe deposit boxes with him as a secondary user, "just for access". Like family members of very close friends. This is done all the time by people with lots of cash. "legally you aren't supposed to use a box for cash", but most old timers do. I remember when a large bank was hit over a holiday weekend about 25 years ago, and my friends, "Detectives", on the scene, told me that people had heart attacks, right there in the bank, when they were finally allowed in to see if their box was hit.

TheFringe
March 24, 2010, 08:13 PM
Quote:
heavy-duty safe with inch-thick steel sides bolted into a concrete pad built for the safe in a room adjacent to the garage on ground level.

The only thing he could have effectively done differently is change the bold portion!... If at all possible a heavy ass safe should be put below ground level... they may break up the concrete or any number of other things, but unless the come in with a cutting torch or the like, they are going to have a hell of a time hauling that safe up the stairs...

Very true.
No matter how heavy a safe is, there are a couple very small and inexpensive tools available that would enable a man move it along one floor all by himself:

ServiceSoon
March 24, 2010, 08:39 PM
Even a $10,000 safe wouldn't have prevented a thief with 9 days from pay day.

EHL
March 24, 2010, 08:54 PM
The money, which belonged to a close friend, was partly inherited and was to provide for the families retirement years.


This sounds like a motive for making up a "burglary" story.

HOWARD J
March 24, 2010, 09:07 PM
19-3 ben
IRS is in charge of the money collection on the so called Obamacare-guess what ?

Speaking of stealing: down the street from my oldest-nice neighborhood--a HOME IMPROVMENT truck pulled up to the house--they took 2 days ( homeowner on vacation ) stole everything in the house including wiring & copper tubing---not nice............

a1abdj
March 24, 2010, 09:21 PM
Even a $10,000 safe wouldn't have prevented a thief with 9 days from pay day.

Depends on what tools he has. I've had a few safes keep me out for several days, and I'm properly equipped and educated.

BeerSleeper
March 24, 2010, 09:46 PM
Speaking of stealing: down the street from my oldest-nice neighborhood--a HOME IMPROVMENT truck pulled up to the house--they took 2 days ( homeowner on vacation ) stole everything in the house including wiring & copper tubing---not nice............

Sound like really smart crooks, until the part where they couldn't spell improvEment

Mandolin
March 24, 2010, 10:53 PM
Sound like really smart crooks, until the part where they couldn't spell improvEment

Didn't the two dognappers in 101 Dalmations mis-spell words on their truck/ bags as well?

Seriously, though, so guys did just that at the VA hospital my father works at. They dressed up like movign men and stole a huge flat-screen TV.

Zoidberg523
March 25, 2010, 12:56 AM
your best bet is a mix of alarms, locks, animals, and friends...

Not to mention the most important - INSURANCE.

rm23
March 25, 2010, 01:52 AM
This story will be picked apart by the police and we'll find out that this guy is somehow related to Mr. Runawayprius.

ForumSurfer
March 25, 2010, 08:41 AM
This guy wasn't too bright. Very few people keep that kind of cash in the house.

You wouldn't do it and neither would I.

However, in trying economic times there are many people who resort to this. Well educated, financially secure people. People that keep 5 figures or more stuffed in the back of a safe. Divorced guys hiding their new start-up business cash profits from ex-wives, tin-foil hat guys convinced the government will eminently collapse...you'd be surprised.

I once had a neighbor (surgeon) who was a great guy, very intelligent. When he died, his son was over at his house a few weeks later going under his house with an entrenching tool. Puzzled, I went to ask him if he, er uh need any help?:scrutiny: Turns out the old guy would put $1000 or more in a sealed container and bury it under his house from time to time "just in case." In each container he would leave something iron or steel so he could find it later with a metal detector. After a depressing Saturday full of digging, he had over $20k in cash and a nice collection of Tupperware.

Back to the topic...no safe is "safe" if anyone other than you knows what is in it.

huntsman
March 25, 2010, 09:04 AM
However, in trying economic times there are many people who resort to this. Well educated, financially secure people. People that keep 5 figures or more stuffed in the back of a safe. Divorced guys hiding their new start-up business cash profits from ex-wives, tin-foil hat guys convinced the government will eminently collapse...you'd be surprised.

Its one thing to keep cash at home it’s another thing to be stupid about it.

HOWARD J
March 25, 2010, 10:08 AM
BeerSleeper

Where they come from--the dropout rate is 70%
no further comment.............................................:)

FIVETWOSEVEN
March 25, 2010, 08:43 PM
sounds like this guy lost his safe in a "boating accident"

navyretired 1
March 26, 2010, 12:25 AM
My safe came with instructions for bolting to the floor and wall and I would bet most of them do and I don't have 200K.
Somebody knew where, when, and how unless it was in the newspaper it was a friend.

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