federal xm193 5.56 ammo?


PDA






rifleman14
March 23, 2010, 07:57 PM
hello everyone
i recently got a doublestar M4 style AR15 and am wondering how the federal xm193 ammo performs? im trying to decide between buying all the reloading equipment for 5.56 or just buying factory ammo. and at $90 for 200 rounds, the federal xm193 stuff is pretty cheap. so will i get what i pay for as far as accuracy and performance if i go with the federal ammo?
thanks
Dylan

If you enjoyed reading about "federal xm193 5.56 ammo?" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!
Hatterasguy
March 23, 2010, 08:09 PM
I have found anything Federal to be fantastic.

Lately I have been buying the American Eagle Xm193 for about $75 for 200.

Uncle Mike
March 23, 2010, 08:10 PM
It's good ammo for the most part...some guns like it....some guns don't!

wcwhitey
March 23, 2010, 09:29 PM
It's M193 Milspec, 55 grain FMJ. Does what it is supposed to and as accurate as most ball ammo. That price is not really bad if that is with shipping. If you are going to add shipping shop around the prices have dropped to the $7 a box range and you could save a few bucks.

I have been shooting PRVI M193 at $73/200 from Wideners. Can't tell the difference between it an the Federal and the price never rose like the Federal did. Bill

DIM
March 23, 2010, 09:43 PM
XM193 by American Eagle I tried 40 rounds, the result is inconclusive, one round failed to fire due to the primer, then about 3 of them had cracks in their necks nothing major but caused fliers, other then that 3/4" groups with fliers from time to time

rifleman14
March 23, 2010, 11:35 PM
so wcwhitey what youre saying is that 193 is a standard load that many different brands offer? so is this ammunition close to the same as what our troops are using?

mptrimshop
March 23, 2010, 11:39 PM
i know the first time i took my ARE out i burnt threw 1000 rounds......thats 450 bux......i wouldn't call it cheap.... i never get my gun out without shooting about 200 rounds

DIM
March 23, 2010, 11:49 PM
historically AR's used 1:12 twist, so 55 grain ammo was widely used, but 55 grain bullets do have their limitations specially down range, so new AR builds had adopted 1:7 twist capable shooting farther with heavier (80-90 grain) bullets which have greater impact force, can 1:7 twist barrel stabilize 55 grain bullet, i think not, they require at least 62 grains, which 1:12 can't handle, but many agencies still use an old twist in their barrels so 55 grain are still available.

medalguy
March 23, 2010, 11:53 PM
In my experience the brass is not the best for reloading. Primer pockets tend to be oversize and repriming yields somewhat loose primers. I prefer LC greatly. And yes the XM193 load is SUPPOSED to be the mil standard the troops are getting. I hope their quality is a lot better.

DIM
March 23, 2010, 11:57 PM
The American Eagle XM193 is using LC brass, its where I found cracks in the necks, I only bought them to see if I can use them for reloads, their primer pockets are not align with the center so flash hole can be someplace on the side of the primer pocket.

Hatterasguy
March 24, 2010, 12:07 AM
so wcwhitey what youre saying is that 193 is a standard load that many different brands offer? so is this ammunition close to the same as what our troops are using?

Used to, although I'm sure the government still has a ton sitting around. Now its M855, and the new cool rounds like the MK262, and MK318 if I remember correctly.

Most newer military rifles have a 1/7 twist for the heavy rounds.

I never had a problem putting 55 grain rounds through a 1/7 barrel, but I'm not going to nail driving accuracy either. If I was I'd use rounds closer to the MK262.

rifleman14
March 24, 2010, 07:30 AM
thats interesting
could someone possibly provide me with a list and load information for these different military loads?
thank you
dylan

Al Thompson
March 24, 2010, 10:08 AM
Dylan, this link will give lots of stuff to look at. ;)

http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=208641

Arkady
March 24, 2010, 01:10 PM
Try here: http://ammo.ar15.com/ammo/

It's probably way more information than you're looking for, but I'd rather deal with too much than too little.

sixgunner455
March 24, 2010, 03:58 PM
55 grain m193 ball was the standard military load for many years, with the original M16 twist rate of 1:14 not surviving long due to lack of long range accuracy, and the M16a1 twist rate of 1:12 being the standard until the introduction of the M16a2 at 1:7. Along with the tighter 1:7 rate came the 63 grain M885 steel penetrator ball, along with new tracer ball compatible with the impact point of the M855.

1:7 probably overstabilizes 55 grain bullets. :shrug: 1:12 won't properly stabilize anything heavier than about 55 grain bullets, and you will get keyholing by 100 meters if you use heavier bullets. 1:7 stabilizes sufficiently for 75-80 grain SMK rounds, which are what is generally used in heavy sniper rounds, and long range target rounds. There may be even heavier bullets used for special purposes.

Most commercial AR barrels I've seen are 1:9 or 1:7. If you're not shooting any of the heavy target/sniper stuff, the 1:9 will work fine.

For a dedicated varmint rifle that only sees 45-55 grain bullets, the 1:12 is still fine.

wcwhitey
March 24, 2010, 07:49 PM
"55 grain m193 ball was the standard military load for many years, with the original M16 twist rate of 1:14 not surviving long due to lack of long range accuracy, and the M16a1 twist rate of 1:12 being the standard until the introduction of the M16a2 at 1:7. Along with the tighter 1:7 rate came the 63 grain M885 steel penetrator ball, along with new tracer ball compatible with the impact point of the M855.

1:7 probably overstabilizes 55 grain bullets. :shrug: 1:12 won't properly stabilize anything heavier than about 55 grain bullets, and you will get keyholing by 100 meters if you use heavier bullets. 1:7 stabilizes sufficiently for 75-80 grain SMK rounds, which are what is generally used in heavy sniper rounds, and long range target rounds. There may be even heavier bullets used for special purposes.

Most commercial AR barrels I've seen are 1:9 or 1:7. If you're not shooting any of the heavy target/sniper stuff, the 1:9 will work fine.

For a dedicated varmint rifle that only sees 45-55 grain bullets, the 1:12 is still fine."

Well said Sixgunner! My 1:9's shoot very well with anything from 50 gains to 69 grains.

Rifleman, yes the M193 is the military designation for the 55 FMJ used prior to the adaption of the M855/SS109 62 grain loadings. When you see companies advertise as M193 it means that they are attempting to duplicate the military specification for that round. It does not mean that this always happens however or they are a military contractor.

There are a bunch of good deals for .223/5.56 out right now but I have already expressed my preference for the PRIV Partisan M193 from Wideners at $73/200. Shipping will usually be around $10 generally so that puts you at over $80 unless you buy in more bulk. Price breaks are usually at the 500 and 1000 round quantities.

That said, I would not hesitate to pick up some Federal XM193 (good brass for the reloader) for the same price. I may be tempted at the $90 you mentioned. I just won't pay elevated prices for it.

Hope this helps, Bill.

mptrimshop
March 24, 2010, 11:48 PM
walmart has 100round packs for 39.99...no shipping

shibby
March 24, 2010, 11:54 PM
Ive heard bad things about the federal bulk .223, but Ill be burning through a box in a week and find out myself

Mr.Davis
March 25, 2010, 11:00 PM
walmart has 100round packs for 39.99...no shipping
Maybe YOUR Walmart does...my Walmart just has an empty shelf labeled "Ammo" :D

Tirod
March 26, 2010, 10:28 AM
The "X" in XM 193 specifically means not milspec. It may have been produced for that purpose, but it didn't make the grade even if that maker had a contract.

If it doesn't meet the spec, it's not milspec. It's considered out of standard and not fit for military use. Most of it will be just fine, some of it will be questionable, one or two will be a problem - popped primers, cracks, misseated bullets, loose crimps, double charges, and fatal kabooms, which are rare.

Lots of people accept the risk. The government refused. I always find it interesting that milspec standards are such a strongly encouraged issue on forums, but shooting military reject and surplus ammo is ok.

I don't see consistency in either.

If you enjoyed reading about "federal xm193 5.56 ammo?" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!