Thoughts on Ruger LCR's reliabilty, durability?


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wacki
March 25, 2010, 02:06 AM
What's the consensus on the Ruger LCR? How well does it hold up over time? Just asking because a new gun that's got a lot of plastic seems like a high risk scenario. What is Ruger's Warranty and service like?

Also, I heard S&W is coming out with a comparable model. Anyone know what it is?

Thanks,

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mechawreck
March 25, 2010, 08:32 AM
Not plastic -polymer. It holds up fine on semis, so I don't see the fuss.

I've had it less than a year, but it's the most pleasant snub I've shot. Seems to hold up fine and being dao, there aren't many places to catch lent and dirt. Ruger's service is very reliable from what I've heard.

And smith & wesson's equivalent is on their website. Seems to be their answer to the LCR and LCP. http://www.smith-wesson.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/CustomContentDisplay?langId=-1&storeId=10001&catalogId=11101&content=754501

MCgunner
March 25, 2010, 09:52 AM
Taurus is coming out with one, too. They're the rage, now. Me, I have a good snubby, I'll pass, but I don't know if I've ever heard of anyone questioning the durability of a Ruger. I love the design. I don't see why the polymer would have anything to do with the durability, either, seeing as it has no polymer where there is stress on the gun. The polymer is in the grip frame.

Manco
March 25, 2010, 11:32 AM
Not plastic -polymer.

The words may be different but the meaning is the same. Some plastics are stronger than others, but they're all plastic just like how both zinc and hardened tool steel are metals. I'm sure that the type of plastic used in the grip frame of the LCR is quite a strong and resilient one, and I haven't heard about any issues with it thus far.

MCgunner
March 25, 2010, 12:20 PM
Well, not that it applies to handguns, but perhaps rifle stocks, just that there IS a difference between injection molded polymers and laminates like fiberglass or carbon fiber. Too, there are many different polymers just as there are many different metals. More variety in polymers, actually. Being compounds of organics, they are not limited by the periodic table. Of course, there are alloys, but now I'm way off topic.

The polymer used in the P series autos like the P95 and P94 is TOUGH. It's so good, the frame rails that ride on the slide are polymer, no metal insert subframe like in most polymer guns. It works great and these guns last.

flipajig
March 25, 2010, 12:47 PM
Ive got a P95 and have shot it for over a year (3500 to 4000) rds and no problems
so i went with the LCR (picked it up on tue). I read alot of revues on it and saw only one bad one.
in the gap between the barrel and cylinder the aluminum frame was pitting from the blast now how many rds were shot for this to happen i dont know i saw this on utube.

Manco
March 25, 2010, 04:10 PM
Well, not that it applies to handguns, but perhaps rifle stocks, just that there IS a difference between injection molded polymers and laminates like fiberglass or carbon fiber.

Actually, the "polymers" used in most handguns are also composites even though they're molded rather than laid down in sheets; specifically, they're some form of nylon reinforced by glass fibers (depending on the manufacturer). I'm not sure what processes are used to get the right properties, and it's probably a compromise, but technically they are composites with an organic polymer matrix and glass fiber reinforcement.

Interestingly, in the field of aerospace similar materials are commonly called "glass-reinforced plastic" (often used in aircraft radomes, including those of supersonic fighters), but such a sissy term would be taboo in the ultra-macho world of guns, so they're called "polymer"...OOH! :rolleyes: You can't call it "composite" even though that would be more accurate because people will automatically think that you specifically mean carbon fiber reinforcement in an epoxy matrix. My point was that whatever you call it, it is what it is, and "plastic" is just as suitable as any other colloquial term.

Too, there are many different polymers just as there are many different metals. More variety in polymers, actually. Being compounds of organics, they are not limited by the periodic table. Of course, there are alloys, but now I'm way off topic.

Well, alloys can still commonly be called metals, as I did earlier with steel (an alloy of iron and carbon at minimum).

Fat Boy
March 25, 2010, 10:49 PM
I have shot one of the Ruger LCR's; 3/4 cylinders- had one light strike/misfire. As far as durability, Ruger has historically "overbuilt" their guns, so I would anticipate the same from the LCR.

As far as comfortable shooting, I can't see much difference between the Ruger LCR and any of the alloy lightweight snubbies I have shot, such as the S&W 442 and so forth; they all jump and bark.

Trigger pull was pretty nice, in my novice opinion

DPris
March 26, 2010, 12:23 AM
As an endurance test, I put 5000 rounds of +P JHPs and a few extra odds & ends through an LCR over the past couple months.

The polymer subframe shows no signs of wear or deformation, but the aluminum frame that contains the cylinder & barrel tube stretched measurably, and the barrel/cylinder gap grew. The gun still functions perfectly, but you will see some frame stretching eventually if you shoot a lot of +P stuff. I'd say you can count on the gun being good at least to 5000, and farther depending on what you shoot in it.
Ruger tells me they tested to 10,000 & wore out the barrel's rifling, dunno what ammunition they were shooting.
Flamecutting was not an issue on the gun here.

No malfunctions attributable to the gun, several when the glove I was wearing shortstroked the trigger.


Fat,
People need to understand that Ruger is no longer "overbuilding" all of their models.
The Gold Label wasn't, the SR9 isn't, the LCP isn't, and the LCR isn't. It's a different management & one that doesn't view the world the same way Bill Ruger did.
That's not saying they're junk, just that with some designs expectations need to be reconciled with reality.

Denis

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