Hornady bulks .223


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kestak
April 2, 2010, 11:14 AM
Greetings,

Anyone did some testing about the Hornady bulk bullets 223 FMJ and SP about which one gives the best accuracy?

I went through 2 boxes of SP and I am considering maybe buying the FMJ because they are a little bit cheaper.

Thank you

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rcmodel
April 2, 2010, 01:37 PM
Any bullet with the jacket hole in the nose will shoot better then FMJ with the open jacket base.

If cheap is most important, get the FMJ.

If accuracy is most important, get anything else.

rc

kestak
April 2, 2010, 01:40 PM
Greetings,

Those FMJ don't have an open base. What do you mean RCmodel?

I am curious, I noticed those bullets nose are not "perfect" like the FMJ ones. The point can be non concentrical (or whatever how this term is written) or it can be shorter or longer. Wouldn't it have more impact on the precision than a perfect nose bullet?

Thank you

Gik-tal
April 2, 2010, 08:59 PM
I have been using the Hornady 55 grain fmj for years now, most consistant FMJ 55 grain I've found.

HOWARD J
April 2, 2010, 09:15 PM
[IMG]http://img260.imageshack.us/img260/3950/hornady.th.jpg (http://img260.imageshack.us/i/hornady.jpg/)[/IM

I use this bullet all the time.
Note exposed lead bottom.................

ole farmerbuck
April 2, 2010, 09:19 PM
I'm a BTHP man but i have to say, Hornady 55gr SP bullets group better than i thought they would. Now i'm glad i stocked up on them.

LeonCarr
April 2, 2010, 09:35 PM
IME the 55 grain Hornady SPs shoot groups roughly half the size of 55 grain Hornady FMJs. For best accuracy, the BTHPs, especially the Sierra Matchkings, are tackdrivers.

Just my .02,
LeonCarr

NCsmitty
April 2, 2010, 10:11 PM
I guess there's one way to find out which type of bullet shoots best for you. Load them up equal and go for it.
Personally, I've never seen bulk FMJ's that would consistently group better than SP or HP in .224 caliber.



NCsmitty

stingrr
April 2, 2010, 11:50 PM
Maybe I didnt play enough with my load for the bulk Hornady 55 gr. SP's, but I was able to get better groupings out of the bulk Hornady 55gr. FMJ's in my rifle.

Not by much mind you though.

BsChoy
April 3, 2010, 01:03 AM
55 sp's shoot really nice for me

ants
April 3, 2010, 01:18 AM
Kestak, when rc model says "open" he means the configuration of the copper jacket. A typical fmj has exposed lead at the base, because the copper jacket is 'open' at the bottom. Soft point has an opening at the nose, which is why you see the lead at the tip. Hollow point is obviously open at the nose.

All rifle bullets with their opening at the nose have the potential for being more accurate because the base is very smooth and uniform. Upon exiting the muzzle, the hot muzzle blast blows smoothly past the bullet without upsetting it. The fmj bullet (with it's open base and exposed lead core) does not have a smooth base, so the high velocity (supersonic!) muzzle blast shoves it around and destabilizes the bullet. In nearly every case, fmj isn't as stable and accurate as a good soft point or hollow point bullet. (Of course, any bullet can be made poorly. We're talking about good bullets.)

The lead tip of a .224" soft point bullet: It can be deformed, or even mangled. But it usually doesn't seem to be a source of inaccuracy. This one is hard to explain theoretically, but millions of shooters confirm the observation. The deformed lead point is close to the bullet centerline, as the bullet spins the deformed nose doesn't represent a sizeable angular imbalance, so it doesn't yaw or pitch. A deformity out on the large radius of the bullet would be bad, but close to centerline isn't so bad. None of us like the looks of a deformed soft point, but it usually shoots pretty well anyway.

The most accurate bullets are the ones made most perfectly. Regardless of bullet design, a precisely constructed bullet gives you the greatest potential for accuracy. That's why Sierra MatchKing, Hornady A-Max, Nosler Ballistic Tip, and other premium bullets are more expensive than ordinary fmj or soft point bullets. It takes more time and skill to make a bullet as nearly perfect as can be achieved in a mass manufacturing environment.

The most perfect bullets: Look at the ones that are machined individually out of a solid bar of brass. You buy those directly from the machine companies who make them for long range match shooters. They aren't found on clearance sales at cheaper-than-dirt and MidwayUSA.

ole farmerbuck
April 3, 2010, 07:11 AM
Kestak, when rc model says "open" he means the configuration of the copper jacket. A typical fmj has exposed lead at the base, because the copper jacket is 'open' at the bottom. Soft point has an opening at the nose, which is why you see the lead at the tip. Hollow point is obviously open at the nose.

All rifle bullets with their opening at the nose have the potential for being more accurate because the base is very smooth and uniform. Upon exiting the muzzle, the hot muzzle blast blows smoothly past the bullet without upsetting it. The fmj bullet (with it's open base and exposed lead core) does not have a smooth base, so the high velocity (supersonic!) muzzle blast shoves it around and destabilizes the bullet. In nearly every case, fmj isn't as stable and accurate as a good soft point or hollow point bullet. (Of course, any bullet can be made poorly. We're talking about good bullets.)

The lead tip of a .224" soft point bullet: It can be deformed, or even mangled. But it usually doesn't seem to be a source of inaccuracy. This one is hard to explain theoretically, but millions of shooters confirm the observation. The deformed lead point is close to the bullet centerline, as the bullet spins the deformed nose doesn't represent a sizeable angular imbalance, so it doesn't yaw or pitch. A deformity out on the large radius of the bullet would be bad, but close to centerline isn't so bad. None of us like the looks of a deformed soft point, but it usually shoots pretty well anyway.

The most accurate bullets are the ones made most perfectly. Regardless of bullet design, a precisely constructed bullet gives you the greatest potential for accuracy. That's why Sierra MatchKing, Hornady A-Max, Nosler Ballistic Tip, and other premium bullets are more expensive than ordinary fmj or soft point bullets. It takes more time and skill to make a bullet as nearly perfect as can be achieved in a mass manufacturing environment.

The most perfect bullets: Look at the ones that are machined individually out of a solid bar of brass. You buy those directly from the machine companies who make them for long range match shooters. They aren't found on clearance sales at cheaper-than-dirt and MidwayUSA.
Yea, just what ants said! Thanks Nick,i needed that too and probably a lot of others.

kestak
April 3, 2010, 07:41 AM
Greetings,

Thank you all! I understand now.

Walkalong
April 3, 2010, 10:59 AM
As far as accuracy is concerned, the tip matters very little, but the base is everything.

As posted above. :)

Then we can talk about uniform jackets etc. ;)


If cheap is most important, get the FMJ.

If accuracy is most important, get anything else.

rc
Exactly

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