can I Substitute A Sizing die for a Crimp Die


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tackstrp
April 3, 2010, 10:19 AM
My loaded .380 bullets often don't look very smooth and some times will not chamber due to bulges midway on the case. After I put on the "so called taper crimp" i remove the dicapping pin from my Dillon sizer and run the loaded rounds through again.

My Question is can I just buy another sizing die and replace the Dillon Crimp die?

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FROGO207
April 3, 2010, 11:07 AM
Lee makes a factory crimp type sizing die for the 380 for that purpose. Some say that it shrinks the bullet and if done correctly you don't need it...ETC. I use mine when loading 380, 9mm, 45 ACP, 30 carbine, and 40 S&W. I use them to confirm the round is sized correctly and most times it does nothing. Other times it will size the round. As I have observed the die does NOT make those rounds less accurate.........no difference as they all shoot better than I can hold the pistol. BTW they make them for most all common cartridge types in rifle and pistol.
The reason that they don't look smooth is the sizing die will size the brass slightly smaller than needed then when inserting the bullet it actually expands a small amount and helps lock the bullet in place to keep it from sliding in further. Some brass has a thinner wall and it does not bulge out enough to be seen but the grip on the bullet still needs neck tension to hold it in place.

RustyFN
April 3, 2010, 11:27 AM
I would say no it's not a good idea to run a loaded round through a sizing die. It is going to size the bullet and the brass, the brass will spring back more than the bullet and you have a very good chance of having loose bullets. Take one of them and put the bullet against the bench and push on the back of the case. You should be able to push very hard and nothing will change. The Lee FCD works a little different because the sizing ring is not as small as a sizing die and will normally get past the bullet and size the bulge below the bullet.

Beelzy
April 3, 2010, 11:33 AM
Make sure to use a small base die for those little cases. Or a quality set of dies.

My Hornady set leaves a little bulge but they function perfectly in my autos.

rcmodel
April 3, 2010, 11:36 AM
don't look very smooth and some times will not chamber due to bulges midway on the case.What kind of brass?
I think Federal is using an internal step or shoulder in their .380 cases to prevent any chance of bullet set-back.

If you seat deeper then they did, the base of the bullet will wedge past the step and bulge out the cases.

As already mentioned, you cannot use a sizing die on a loaded round because it will squeeze the bullet undersized when it squeezes the case under size.

rc

918v
April 3, 2010, 11:37 AM
They don't make small base dies for the 380.

fguffey
April 3, 2010, 11:37 AM
You need a reason, I have two 45s that like new factory ammo, neither like reloads that look like they swallowed a bullet, when I want them to run smooth I use a RCBS carbide sizer die to crimp with after crimping, I use the sizer die to remove the bulge in the case and I will not change this technique, I appreciate the accuracy and bullet hold, I have attempted pulling the bullets, not easy and the measurements after the same as factory ammo.

F. Guffey

fguffey
April 3, 2010, 11:41 AM
Dillon has a great system, seat on one die, crimp on another, more times than not the crimp when applied requires a hint of effort, excessive crimping can bulge the case.

F. Guffey

James2
April 3, 2010, 11:46 AM
1. Just put enough taper crimp on them to get rid of the bell. Excessive crimp can bulge the brass. If they won't chamber, I suspect you are trying to put too much crimp on them.

2. There should be a slight bulge where the end of the bullet is in the brass. This is to be expected and is not a problem as long as the round chambers OK.

3. Read this: http://donce.lofthouse.com/jamaica/crimping.html

918v
April 3, 2010, 11:50 AM
You need a reason, I have two 45s that like new factory ammo, neither like reloads that look like they swallowed a bullet, when I want them to run smooth I use a RCBS carbide sizer die to crimp with after crimping, I use the sizer die to remove the bulge in the case and I will not change this technique, I appreciate the accuracy and bullet hold, I have attempted pulling the bullets, not easy and the measurements after the same as factory ammo.

F. Guffey
Holy Poop!

howlnmad
April 3, 2010, 12:28 PM
I read somewhere that the Lee FCD uses a carbide ring at the base of the die. It would seem to me that it is doing the same thing a sizing die does so I don't see where there would be a problem.

918v
April 3, 2010, 01:04 PM
Because the FCD is about the same size as a loaded round, whereas the sizing die is about .005" smaller. Run a loaded round through a sizer die and you will reduce the diameter of the bullet by .005" or so. You'll completely ruin the round.

RustyFN
April 3, 2010, 01:27 PM
Because the FCD is about the same size as a loaded round, whereas the sizing die is about .005" smaller. Run a loaded round through a sizer die and you will reduce the diameter of the bullet by .005" or so. You'll completely ruin the round.

Exactly.

918 good to see you. Missed you at a couple of the old hang out's.

918v
April 3, 2010, 03:00 PM
Good to see you too.

I like some bulges in my round. Peace of mind.

tackstrp
April 3, 2010, 08:44 PM
thanks all. ordered the LEE taper crimp die

moxie
April 4, 2010, 10:53 AM
Basic reloading is a very simple and fun task when done correctly. It ceases to be fun and doesn't work well when we overcomplicate things. Get a good three die set with a carbide ring sizer and a taper crimper/seater. Follow the directions that come with the set. RCBS, Hornady, Dillon and others work just fine. "Factory crimping" and other complexities can be problematic. Do not size loaded rounds as you risk deforming the bullet. A light taper crimp is all you need on these cases for semi-auto pistols. Later on, when you get more proficient, you might want to experiment with a fourth die so that seating and crimping are done as separate steps. But many very experienced reloaders will tell you that this too is an unneccessary complication. One thing that will actually help is a max cartridge gauge, available from Midway. Pop rounds in it and if they go in and out smoothly they should be fine in your gun. See: http://www.midwayusa.com/viewproduct/?productnumber=811584

mrwilson
April 12, 2010, 07:31 PM
tackstrp, I think the previous poster was referring to the Lee Factory Crimp Die and not the taper crimp die. I use the FCD for 380 with excellent results.

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