Barrel Leading Question


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youngda9
April 3, 2010, 08:46 PM
I've read that by shooting lead bullets that you can get leading in your barrel, and that gas checks are recommended for higher velocities. I have a few questions about that. I will be shooting lead out of my 3" Ruger SP101 .357.

Can I obtain high enough velocity for this to be a problem with at 3" gun?

At what velocity does this become a problem typically?

How quickly does leading become an issue...5, 50, 500 rounds?

What is the symptom of leading(decreased velocity, increased pressure)?

If I clean my gun after every range trip is it even anything that I need to look out for or care about?

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Robert Palermo /Penn Bullets
April 3, 2010, 09:00 PM
You can find the answers you need on my website at www.pennbullets.com
Look under the reloading tips section and I detail out all the information you need to use quality cast bullets at high velocities without the need for gas checks.
I can also provide you with some specific data that will also assist you in your goal of shooting cast lead bullets well for your application.

Walkalong
April 3, 2010, 09:54 PM
Tons of info here at CastBoolits (http://castboolits.gunloads.com/) as well.

Wish it had been around when I was learning to load lead. ;)

MissouriBullet
April 3, 2010, 10:19 PM
A definitive source site is http://www.lasc.us. I used much of what I learned there to write the Technical piece at www.missouribullet.com.

Brad

youngda9
April 4, 2010, 07:02 AM
5 specific questions and 3 people responding pointing me to their bullet selling sites...anyone care to take a shot at answering the questions asked?

bds
April 4, 2010, 07:16 AM
5 specific questions and 3 people responding pointing me to their bullet selling sites...anyone care to take a shot at answering the questions asked?

youngda9, leading depends on many variables, especially at 357 magnum velocities and your questions require more complex answers - That's why you were referred to reference sites. But, here is my "short answer" attempt:

Can I obtain high enough velocity for this to be a problem with at 3" gun?
Yes

At what velocity does this become a problem typically?
Generally around 1000+ fps, but depends on the bullet type, bullet-to-barrel fit, alloy mix, BHN (Brinell Hardness Number), etc. - See reference sites for more detail

How quickly does leading become an issue...5, 50, 500 rounds?
Depends, it could happen with the first round, the last round, any round in between or even with every round.

What is the symptom of leading(decreased velocity, increased pressure)?
Erratic projectile performance (keyholing, inconsistent shot groups), coated rifling, really irritated reloader/shooter, etc.

If I clean my gun after every range trip is it even anything that I need to look out for or care about?
If you get leading in your barrel, you should investigate why the leading is occurring - cleaning the leading in the barrel after each range trip is simply treating the symptom, not the cause - not very High Road.

I hope this helped.

youngda9
April 4, 2010, 07:36 AM
BDS....Thank you.

Walkalong
April 4, 2010, 08:33 AM
Can I obtain high enough velocity for this to be a problem with at 3" gun?
It's not the velocity that can get you in trouble here nearly as much as fit and hardness level.

At what velocity does this become a problem typically?

Again, there is much more to it than velocity, and many variables that change the velocity where it can become a problem.

How quickly does leading become an issue...5, 50, 500 rounds?5 or less if everything is wrong. 500, and many more, if everything is right. Lots of variables.

What is the symptom of leading(decreased velocity, increased pressure)?
Generally terrible accuracy. Pressure will be affected if you continue to shoot a heavily leaded, and getting worse, bore.

If I clean my gun after every range trip is it even anything that I need to look out for or care about? Like what? Clean it. Lube it lightly. Put it away.

Yea, two of the folks who posted links sell bullets, but they also have some good info on their sites. Info you need. I don't sell bullets, but I did link to a great source of info. I had to order books and glean info from mags like G&A, Handloader etc. No internet for me back then.

There is so much involved in shooting lead for various calibers that no one can give you an easy definitive answer to 5 simple questions that don't begin to cover it. You really do need to research and read about lead and then you can ask some very informed questions that will get better answers and also help you a great deal more because you will have a general understanding of what you are asking. :)

Robert Palermo /Penn Bullets
April 4, 2010, 08:55 AM
5 specific questions and 3 people responding pointing me to their bullet selling sites...anyone care to take a shot at answering the questions asked?
The information posted on the site is for everyones benefit. The information is long and detailed and somewhat technical and would take up far too much room and time to duplicate it all here. It would provide you with the information you desire. You don't have to buy anything to get the information.

MissouriBullet
April 4, 2010, 09:25 AM
5 specific questions and 3 people responding pointing me to their bullet selling sites...anyone care to take a shot at answering the questions asked?

Never mind, then. Was trying to be helpful without having to re-invent the wheel for you. And I referred you to lasc.us, which assuredly does not sell our bullets.

youngda9
April 4, 2010, 09:35 AM
So from reading all of the information it sounds like if I shoot 5 test shots with the lead I already have, measure the velocity, and then use the equation I saw on one of the sites should tell me what hardness that I need in order to stay out of trouble. Does that sound about right?

Optimum BHN = CUPS / (1422 x .90) This seems like something tangible that I can use...is this a "standard" equation that others use...I never saw this before.

Thanks for all the info.

bluetopper
April 4, 2010, 09:38 AM
I shoot full house 357 and 44 Magnum cast lead bullets with no gas checks and get no leading, as well as 45acp and 9mm among others.

Just a properly fitted bullet and the correct hardness is all you need.

The only gas checks I shoot is out of my 500 Handi-Rifle at over 2100fps and I don't get any leading there either.

Jesse Heywood
April 4, 2010, 12:19 PM
I have had zero problems with leading using MBC bullets and following the BHN formula. I have shot some loads that listed as 1,200 fps.

bds
April 4, 2010, 01:10 PM
So from reading all of the information it sounds like if I shoot 5 test shots with the lead I already have, measure the velocity, and then use the equation I saw on one of the sites should tell me what hardness that I need in order to stay out of trouble. Does that sound about right?

Thankfully, many manufacturers have already done the math/testing for us and published load data for lead bullets. Also, hard cast lead bullet manufacturers work to give us reloaders the right mix of lead alloy to minimize leading - they experienced/know what will minimize leading and that's why Brad and Robert referred you to their websites, not just simply to sell their products. If you start out with known Brinell Hardness Number and the weight of the bullet, you should come close just by varying the powder charge/OAL to get good results (that's what I do). But you can get as technical as you want.

I shoot with other reloaders who shoot their 357 magnums reloads to 1200 fps without leading, but when pushed for information, they will admit only a certain combination of variables will result in lead reloads that don't lead the barrel. I do not load lead bullets to 357 magnum pressure/velocities (only mild 38 special loads), but a recent practice session of shooting 500 rounds of lead 125gr 9mm with 4.3gr-4.6gr W231/HP38 at 1.125" OAL out of a single pistol did not result in any leading (Glock 27 with Lone Wolf conversion barrel). I can vouch for 18 BHN Missiouri bullets not leading in my pistols. YMMV

I have experimented with lead bullets in early days of reloading and got leading by pushing them to near max FMJ velocities. I also found certain powders lead more than others. When I backed off the powder charge, the leading decreased. Now, I can reload around 3%-5% less max load data and not get leading. With a little test load development, you should be able to find a combination that will minimize leading for you.

Texasgunlover
April 4, 2010, 02:19 PM
While it has taken me years to find what shoots aceptable and what leads has been a tedious task indeed.Trial and error seems to be my middle name,but I can without hesitation say that LEWIS LEAD REMOVAL KIT is the best money can buy.It works very quickly,and pays for itself after one use.
I've got a kit in my BOB just incase because all boolits are not made equal.
Hope this helps

Gadzooks Mike
April 4, 2010, 04:13 PM
Optimum BHN = CUPS / (1422 x .90) This seems like something tangible that I can use...is this a "standard" equation that others use...I never saw this before.

No, it isn't a standard. It's actually BHN=PSI/(1422 x .90) And the reason for that is that BHN is measured in kilograms per square milimeter. To convert that to pounds per square inch, you multiply by 1422. 90% keeps you safely under the max pressure.

CUPS doesn't actually exist, except what one might be in on a Friday evening. CUP stands for Copper Units of Pressure and doesn't convert easily to PSI, but you can use this to get pretty close: PSI=(CUP x 1.516) - 17,902

Joe Brennan Jr's writings on www.lasc.us clearly uses PSI and not CUP (or even CUPS).

Robert Palermo /Penn Bullets
April 4, 2010, 04:32 PM
There are limitations to using pressure formulas and bhn numbers to determine an optimum alloy. BHN numbers simply by themselves are not truly indicative of a particular alloys strength which is actually the more important factor. Not that these formulas aren't useful to a point but one has to understand that there are more things going on than just BHN numbers and pressure.
As BDS has said the manufactures have done much of the work and calculations and have incorporated it into the finished products. There are differances among us that cannot be quantified by sheer bhn numbers alone.
Home casters have more limitations when dealing with materials of unknown origin and composition. Its possible to obtain a high bhn number but the mix is so far out of kilter that it performs poorly. Other alloys that measure lower BHN numbers but higher alloy strength can actually outperform higher BHN alloys of lower strength.
My most recent details of BHN numbers was recently added to the site under reloading tips.

bds
April 4, 2010, 05:25 PM
Its possible to obtain a high bhn number but the mix is so far out of kilter that it performs poorly. Other alloys that measure lower BHN numbers but higher alloy strength can actually outperform higher BHN alloys of lower strength.

BHN - alloy strength ... I do not cast lead bullets so my understanding of the lead alloying process is zip / nada ... I have tried to explained this to other new reloaders as concrete mix that may have a bit more sand is still better than a batch of proper ratio of cement/sand, but one that has not been mixed well enough with dry clumps ... the well mixed batch with more sand may stay solid but the less mixed batch with dry clumps will fall apart ... :uhoh:

I am glad I don't cast lead bullets. :D

shootinxd
April 4, 2010, 05:32 PM
Hi Youngda9,I have been reloading for a couple years now,just started casting and reloading those.If your into reloading then this is the next step.You will learn alot you never thought possable.Every gun,load,bullet,powder will change weather or not they lead.

youngda9
April 4, 2010, 05:58 PM
I have re-loaded for years, but always with copper jacketed rifle and pistol bullets. I just recently bought my first 1000 lead bullets, originally for a .38 that I sold recently and bought a .357 that I want to shoot some hot lead loads through. So I am trying to figure out how far I can push the lead I bought that wasn't to a particular hardness. The 125gr lead bullets I have are a BHN of 18 I just found out from the manufacturer.

shootinxd
April 4, 2010, 06:12 PM
If you bought commercial bullets,then the lubing,sizing is already done.You still need to slug the barrel and make sure bullet is somewhere around .001-.002" larger than your bore.Make sure and check the powder manufacture for charge amount.There is alot of infoe/knowledge on cast boolits.com.Well worth the time.

youngda9
April 4, 2010, 07:07 PM
Does anyone have any .357 magnum loading data for a lead 125gr bullet using Unique powder...I am having trouble finding this data.

jcwit
April 4, 2010, 08:28 PM
I suggest you purchase the Lyman Cast Bullet Handbook. It gives all kinds of info regarding lead bullets and load data for many bullets. It however does not give data for the specific 125 gr. bullet but then we do not know what 125 gr. bullet you are referring to. It does give data for 121 gr and 133 gr. bullets which should suffice.

bullseye308
April 4, 2010, 08:45 PM
Wow, it took till post 21 for someone to tell him to slug the barrel first. That is what needs to be done before anything else. Once that number is known then you can proceed. Your bullets need to be sized .001 or .002 over your bore diameter for best performance. If you match the correct diameter to the correct hardness at the right velocity, you will have negligable leading.

I finally got it nailed down in my 357 Ruger Gp-100 and from mild to wild I get no leading, just a light grey wash. I clean the barrel about every 1000 rounds if it needs it or not. Mostly it doesn't, but the pistol is real grubby after 1k.

prickett
April 4, 2010, 09:39 PM
As a newbie bullet caster myself, I am FIRMLY in the slug the bore first camp. I've been fighting leading for several months. Finally, I slugged the barrel and found each of my 9mm's have different diameter barrels. So, bullets that don't lead in one gun will lead in the others.

Find a bullet that is .001 to .002 larger than your bore. Hardness is WAY overrated. Quite a few folks cast air cooled wheel weights (which are 5 to 7 BHN less than the formula says is required) without getting leading. I can't remember what the formula's BHN was for 9mm but it was probably double what I'm shooting.

Finally, lube seems somewhat important too. I've not yet had luck with liquid alox lube, while the same rounds work fine (i.e. no leading) when using NRA 50/50.

Buy an Outers Foul Out unit to delead your barrels while you sort everything out.

In answer to your specific questions:

>> Can I obtain high enough velocity for this to be a problem with at 3" gun?

Yes. If your bullet is undersized, you can get leading in a .45 ACP (much lower velocity than a .357). BTW, its not really the velocity so much as the pressure. A 9mm has higher pressure (i.e. harder to get no leading) than a .357.

>> At what velocity does this become a problem typically?

At almost any reasonable velocity if the bullet is undersized.

>> How quickly does leading become an issue...5, 50, 500 rounds?

Depends on how out of whack your bullets are. I've had leading in as few as 20 rounds and it was SIGNIFICANT leading

>> What is the symptom of leading(decreased velocity, increased pressure)?

Never checked on these type symptoms - only saw a thick coating of lead in the barrel when getting home. But, you most likely will see a lack of accuracy as the lands lessen due to lead build up. Also, since the bullet is undersized to begin with, you will see poor accuracy and possibly keyholing.

>> If I clean my gun after every range trip is it even anything that I need to look out for or care about?

Depends on the amount of leading. After some of my outings, I sure wouldn't want to put additional rounds down the barrel.

bluetopper
April 4, 2010, 09:49 PM
youngda9, if your bullets are 18bhn you should be able to push them up to max spec pressure without leading. If they fit your bore good a 357 as well as a 44 Mag should not need jacketed bullets. I shoot my cast bullets at the max and have a nice shiney bore. I just don't have a problem with leading in anything I shoot, semi auto or revolver.

evan price
April 4, 2010, 10:04 PM
Basically, leading is caused by a mix of factors.

The lube- it needs to be right for the velocity and temperature of powder you choose. Too much lube- messy and smoky, too little lube- leading towards the muzzle.
The hard crayon-type lubes most commercial casters use is designed to stay on the bullet in shipping and handling and loading, and not get sticky. They are often too hard and melt at too high temperature to do the best job. The converse is the sticky, soft lubes often burn off into smoke especially with more and more shots and you run out of lube.

The bullet- Too small or too hard- leading near the chamber, or too soft- leading all through the barrel as it strips the rifling.

Hardness VS diameter VS velocity is a tricky one.

A softer bullet that is larger diameter will lead less than a harder bullet that is too small diameter UNLESS you push the bullet too fast and then softer bullets lead more.


I've seen most leading caused, in order of importance, by:
Too small diameter bullets
Too hard bullets
Poor lube quality
Too soft bullets.

To diagnose a leading problem- look down the barrel.

Leading at the chamber and not through the barrel is usually a problem with too hard an alloy or too small diameter, or too hard/high temp melting of lube. Gas checks can help here, because what happens is the burning powder scorches the base of the bullet and causes lead to burn off or push around the bullet and the barrel at the gap at the chamber. A better strategy is to find out what size your throat is and size .001" or .002" larger so you get a tight seal.

Leading at the muzzle is usually caused by the lube running out of lubricity as the bullet goes through the barrel. Too soft or too low a melting point lubes cause this especially with the "hot" fast powders like Red Dot, Clays, Titegroup, etc.

Leading that goes all the way through the barrel from front to back usually means too soft a bullet for velocity- the bullet is stripping the rifling. Gas checks won't help this. The bullet is not hard enough to withstand the trip through the barrel.

bluetopper
April 4, 2010, 11:09 PM
Just recently I was reading an article and I had never thought about this, is the aspect of the rifleing plays on the centrifical force of the lube being thrown out of the groove of the bullet on to the barrel as it passes down the bore forming a seal for the burning gases not to go around the bullet.
I thought it was interesting.

kestak
April 5, 2010, 08:04 AM
Greetings,

As said, leading is MOSTLY (if not all) caused by gas cutting the bullet.

Trial and errors is the key to find out the best powder/bullet/gun ratio to prevent leading. For example, I use 5.1 grains of Unique behind my 9mm hard cast bullets. I use 5.1 grains of #2 behind my 45ACP bullets. All my magnums loads are near full load H110 and none lead. Only the 500 S&W bullets uses gas checks. :D

I get some VERY bad leading in my M9A1 Steyr. All I tried did not work. That means I use only FMJ in this one... :banghead:

Thank you

youngda9
April 5, 2010, 08:30 AM
Thank you for all of the information, I really appreciate it. And a special thanks to jcwit for providing load data to give me a reasonable starting point to work from.

Sidemeat
April 6, 2010, 09:38 AM
Leading in my Springfield Mil-Spec 1911 used to be a BIG problem for me. Heavy leading after just 100 rounds. It sucked. :cuss:

I tried vigorous scrubbing with copper bore brushes and various solvents and oils. I still had stubborn patches that wouldn't come off. I was about to give up and drop $40 on the Lewis Lead Remover. :banghead:

Then I took the advice on the forums here and started using a few strands of a "Chore Boy" copper kitchen scrubbing pad wrapped around a worn-out bore brush to clean my barrel. Use it dry, no solvent. A few passes and it's gone. No problemo. Looks like glitter is falling out of the barrel while you're using it. Clean as a whistle. :D

Sport45
April 6, 2010, 09:51 AM
Fitting the cast bullet to the cylinder throats is more important than fitting to the bore (groove diameter). If the throats are smaller than the groove diameter, which is not unheard-of with Ruger you will get leading no matter what bullet you use. You want a bullet that you can push through the cylinder throats without a lot of effort. Maybe .0005" interference. The throats can be reamed to .0005" larger than groove diameter to optimize the gun for cast shooting if needed. Then a bullet .001" larger than groove is a perfect match.

Then I took the advice on the forums here and started using a few strands of a "Chore Boy" copper kitchen scrubbing pad wrapped around a worn-out bore brush to clean my barrel. Use it dry, no solvent. A few passes and it's gone. No problemo. Looks like glitter is falling out of the barrel while you're using it. Clean as a whistle.

^^ Listen to this. Great advice and much less expensive than the Lewis (now Hoppes) Lead Remover.

5 specific questions and 3 people responding pointing me to their bullet selling sites...

They were trying to teach you to fish. You know, give a man a fish and he has a meal. Teach him to fish and he never goes hungry. Or something like that. ;)

bds
April 6, 2010, 10:00 AM
Heavy leading after just 100 rounds.

Sidemeat, were you able to identify what was causing the leading?

Sidemeat
April 8, 2010, 07:58 AM
Never did identify the cause.

Different loads, different bullet manufacturers, same result: leaded-up like the very devil.

The leading was along the full length, heavier near the chamber, leaving larger patches there. The barrel is smooth and shines like a mirror, probably the finest finish of any of the firearms that I own. When shooting clad bullets, there's no build-up of any kind on it, even after several hundred rounds.

The "Chore Boy" trick saved me. I just don't care if it leads-up now. That nasty, gray scum can slime my barrel 'til the cows come home. I just give it a few, quick passes with my worn-out brush and it's gone. :neener:

azar
April 8, 2010, 10:39 AM
Sidemeat,

I'm having the same problem with my Springfield XD9. I'm having issues of leading down the length of the barrel as well. I believe this is due to gas cutting when gases are escaping around the base of the bullet. I slugged my bore recently and it measured 0.3555" at it's widest. This is a bit larger than the nominal 9mm grove diameter, so for the next batch of bullets I plan to try a bullet sized to 0.357" instead of 0.356" to see if that solves it.

Have you slugged your bore to see if you are oversized and shooting a too small lead bullet? In the meantime, I need to find a local supermarket that carries Chore Boy or some other all copper scouring pad...

243winxb
April 8, 2010, 11:55 AM
Simple answer. :rolleyes: Load 13.0gr Alliant 2400 with 158gr plain base lswc cast bullet (no gas check) .358" diameter. Your choice of primer. (i like mag.):p Do not use a Lee FCD.:uhoh: lol :evil:

earplug
April 8, 2010, 12:07 PM
Think about the millions of 22LR. shot with little or no leading.
22LR. Bullets are fairly soft. There outside lubed heeled bullets and most shot at over 1200 FPS.
I have had very good results with fairly soft cast bullets, Undersize bullets cause more problems leading then slightly oversize.

jcwit
April 8, 2010, 12:48 PM
I cast with 2 Lyman ingots of range lead and 1 ingot of wheel weights. Gives a fairly soft alloy. I use my own mix of parafine, bees wax, auto wax, and alox for a lube. I get bright & shinney bores with no leading.

Personally I think the hard lead deal is way overrated.

barhob
April 8, 2010, 01:32 PM
around 1980 i started shooting lead.
i was told to purchase the ''Lewis Lead Remover''.
I did. Still have it and still use it.
the only place i know to find it is at ''Brownells''. $40 bucks for the kit.
Well worth the money. i encourgage all handgun lead shooters to own one.
buy extra brass patches for the caliber you shoot for the future use to clean your handgun barrels.
You can swab with all the liquid chemicals out there and it will not get the lead out like a brass patch.
(ok mr. brownell---send my $$ for the promo)

BEWARE THE FURY OF A PATIENT MAN. ---John Dryden

Walkalong
April 8, 2010, 05:19 PM
Personally I think the hard lead deal is way overrated.Yep.

ScratchnDent
April 8, 2010, 07:46 PM
The worst leading I've ever experienced was with very hard commercial cast bullets. They were fine when pushed by full power 357 magnum loads, but leaded up the same barrel terribly when pushed by mild 38 special loads.

earplug
April 8, 2010, 08:11 PM
I have read that pressure causes the base of a lead bullet to expand and seal the bore. Term starts with a O but I can't spell it.
Much the same way as a bicycle air pump seal works under pressure.
So to hard a alloy won't seal under light pressure, and a undersize bullet won't have a chance.

bds
April 8, 2010, 08:23 PM
Earplug, the term is obturation.

bds
April 9, 2010, 11:58 PM
The leading was along the full length, heavier near the chamber, leaving larger patches there.

I'm having the same problem with my Springfield XD9. I'm having issues of leading down the length of the barrel as well.

Sidemeat and azar, I am curious about your leading problem. I get very minimal to no leading shooting the harder (24 BHN) lead bullets. However, I get no leading shooting Missouri Bullets in 18 BHN.

I am thinking the harder commercial lead bullets mentioned in previous posts maybe causing "gas cutting" since the harder lead alloy base is less able to "flatten" to seal against the inside of the barrel (obturation). My guess is that this may be the cause for the leading problem you have experienced.

azar, if this is the case, then a softer .356 bullet should work fine in your barrel as long as it obturates to your barrel. Before you try the .357 bullet, you can try the softer 18 BHN from MBC and see if it solves your leading problem. If you want, you can PM me and I can send you a sample of 125gr 18 BHN 9mm to test this out.

Sidemeat
April 10, 2010, 07:11 AM
I shot my 1911 Thursday. 100 rnd of FMJ and Clad Hollowpoint. Nothing in barrel (I looked). Then a single mag of LRN and voila!. . . a scum of lead and a couple of small patches starting. Beats anything I've ever seen. I've shot thousands or LRN out of my S&W J-frames with no problems, but my 1911 leads-up with any LRN I shoot. Fast, slow, any load, any bullet. I'm sure glad I found an easy way to get it out.

azar
April 10, 2010, 06:50 PM
bds,

I'm using the Missouri Bullet "SmallBall" (18 BHN) already. It's with that bullet that I get leading. I'm a bit below the max lead load, so I've made two batches of the next 0.1g increments to see if that helps the bullet properly obturate. Also, I've been using the Lee FCD to do a light crimp (mainly to remove the case flair) and I'm thinking maybe the FCD could be changing the size/shape of the lead projectile.

If neither of those two things work, I'm going to try a .357" sized bullet and perhaps see if Brad will do a 16 BHN batch (maybe even a combination of both). If that doesn't fix it, I'll just switch to Berry's, Rainer, or Montana Gold.

bds
April 10, 2010, 10:50 PM
azar, just to satisfy my curiosity, I loaded some test rounds and went to the range this afternoon. I used Glock 27 with Lone Wolf 9mm conversion barrel and S&W M&P 40 fullsize pistols. BTW, I did not use the FCD for these loads (I usually don't use the FCD for my range/match loads as they test/chamber fine in my tightest barrels).

Just a side note, I have noticed Lone Wolf barrel lands/grooves are highly polished and shiny (right from the manufacturer), so I decided to test a less polished barrel - S&W M&P 40 fullsize (FYI, the barrel has five wider lands than the typical six lands for a semi-auto barrel).

For 40S&W, I intentionally used the harder 24 BHN 180gr lead bullets and loaded some light charge loads with longer OAL to minimize good ignition to aggrevate the "gas cutting" in addition to my normal practice range loads. On about 10 rounds, I even intentionally "tilted" the bullet during seating to force lead shaving around the case neck.

For 9mm, I used 18 BHN 125gr lead bullets and loaded some hotter charges with shorter OAL to push the bullet faster.

I loaded 100 rounds each caliber (yes, one benefit of Pro 1000 - I had all the rounds loaded within 30 minutes even with the caliber change) and checked the barrel after about 20 rounds of shooting.

Results:

9mm - No leading after my range/practice loads. No leading after "hotter" loads with even shorter OAL. I have noticed the usual black fouling along the grooves during cleaning the barrel after the shooting session. I let the Hoppes #9 solvent soak in the barrel (about 5-15 minutes) after I run my copper bore brush through the barrel several times and the fouling comes clean. I inspected the patch cloth (I use a piece of paper towel) and saw the usual very fine speckles of lead (fine like flour particles) among the black fouling residue.

40S&W - No leading after my range/practice loads. No leading after the "lighter" loads with even longer OAL. I have noticed the usual black fouling along the grooves and more fouling buildup near the chamber end of the barrel where rifling starts. Even after shooting the "tilted" bullet rounds with lead slivers around the case neck, no leading down the barrel. During cleaning, I only saw the usual fine speckles of lead as 9mm barrel cleaning.

azar, I hope this shed more light on your XD leading situation. BTW, how rough is the XD barrel?

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