Don't be stupid & light off your primer tube. A public service announcement.


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GJgo
April 8, 2010, 12:20 AM
So I had my first "That was dumb. Yep, I still have 10 fingers." moment while reloading some 9mm last night. I was sitting at my Hornady LnL progressive press, which seems to have a problem with Federal small primers hanging up when the cam tries to slide them forward. On most days it's only been a minor annoyance, however last night for some reason every single one was sticking in there. I started down the wrong decision path by getting annoyed.

After 5 teardowns to clear the jam, on the 6th one I stupidly decided to just rack on the cam a few times to clear it out. The smart thing to do WOULD have been to stop, tear it all down, and leave it alone until I could chamfer the bottom of the hole where the edge of the primers were hanging up. I must have left my thinking cap at work.

So, what did the stuck primer say to his 94 friends sitting on top of him in the primer tube? BANG!!! The protective blast shield steel tube that surrounds the aluminum primer tube acted like a barrel and shot the ruptured aluminum tube an inch into my ceiling! (see photo) Primers are no joke, folks, the entire full tube lit off insantaneously just like a gun shot.

Be safe, guys, and don't let the combination of testosterone & malfunctioning machinery get the best of you. I take full responsibility for the ID10T error here, it could have easily caused an injury much greater than my pride & a ringing in my ear. I'm pretty embarrased about it but maybe my story will save someone else some pain.

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Beerme
April 8, 2010, 12:22 AM
at least your safe man
but damnit thats funny

pcwirepro
April 8, 2010, 12:25 AM
Wow. Glad to hear you still have all your digits. Did you change your shorts prior to taking that picture?

Alabama2010
April 8, 2010, 12:27 AM
bet that was no joke on your ears...glad no one got injured.

grubbylabs
April 8, 2010, 12:29 AM
See what most people don't understand is that testicles, impatience and dangerous work that requires patience does not mix.


I am glad you are OK, I don't mean to make lite of your experience but the way you wrote it had me laughing and my wife looking at me like I lost all my marbles.

GJgo
April 8, 2010, 12:35 AM
See what most people don't understand is that testicles, impatience and dangerous work that requires patience does not mix.
LOL so true. Actually, the first thing I did was let my wife know I was OK. Then, I grabbed a Q tip, wetted the end, and stuck it in the hole I pulled the tube out of in the ceiling to make sure nothing in there was smoldering. That was actually my second thought, with my first being "Holy S--T that was loud!"

FatGeek
April 8, 2010, 12:41 AM
See what most people don't understand is that testicles, impatience and dangerous work that requires patience does not mix.
I am glad you are OK, I don't mean to make lite of your experience but the way you wrote it had me laughing and my wife looking at me like I lost all my marbles.

I've got too many scars on my hands from allowing testosterone, impatience and sharp objects to mix.

Thanks for posting, wife was trying to figure out why I was laughing also :)

Sport45
April 8, 2010, 01:07 AM
Glad you were okay. Looks like a few blew out the top before it hit the ceiling. You may have a few live live primers lurking around now.

Maybe Lee (and Federal) were right when they said not to use Federal primers in progressives. ;)

W.E.G.
April 8, 2010, 01:09 AM
When the wife walked in, and asked just what the hell is going on, I would calmly inform her that I was running a cable feed, and could she please go upstairs and grab the other end of the wire.

GJgo
April 8, 2010, 01:16 AM
I had to dig 5 or 6 primers out of the ceiling with a knife. There were some still in the tube, and a whole mess on the floor. Every one I found was spent. I gave it all a good wipe down and then ran the vacuum to sweep them all up. When I took a shower I even found one in my hair!

russellcframe
April 8, 2010, 01:24 AM
Woops. Glad you are ok. I understand now why my Lee Reloading Manual says "never use a priming tool which stacks primers in a tube".

MetalHead
April 8, 2010, 01:27 AM
You haven't lived till you vacuumed up live primers, kinda hard on the vacuum bag though!

Balrog
April 8, 2010, 01:39 AM
This problem could have been avoided with a visit to www.dillonprecision.com

ReloaderFred
April 8, 2010, 01:59 AM
Actually, Dillons have been known to blow a tube of primers, too. So have other brands that use stacked primer tubes.

When I was loading on an Ammo Load automatic loading machine for our department, I had the primer tube blow on two occasions. That primer tube held 200 primers, by the way. Since it was a motor driven press, there wasn't a whole lot I could do to prevent it from happening. I've also seen a C-H blow a tube, but not while I was operating it.

Hope this helps.

Fred

Sommerled
April 8, 2010, 02:23 AM
My 18 y.o. son was reloading 223 for an upcoming prairie dog hunt and was, as he admits, breaking my rules meant to keep him safe. Rules such as concentrate, no distractions, don't rush anything, and always wear eye protection. Well, he had his IPod in his ears, no eye protection, and was hurrying to get done so he could go somewhere. He forced a primer that was probably askew or something. I heard the bang from upstairs. Only the one primer went off, thankfully, and shrapnel hit him in the face without damage. He sure had a look of wonderment on his face.

He now follows the rules. Some have to learn the hard way.

So glad no one was hurt.

Sommerled

UpTheIrons
April 8, 2010, 02:33 AM
I've read that Federal primers are the last ones you'd want to put in an automatic feeder, because they are so soft. Is that y'alls experience, too?

Aside from this...uh...rather vigorous example, that is.

bds
April 8, 2010, 03:16 AM
Wow, more reason why I am happy to hand prime my cases! :eek:

Zak Smith
April 8, 2010, 03:58 AM
I blew a tube of primers on my 650. Its safeties worked quite well, and they sent me replacement parts very quickly.

Oyeboten
April 8, 2010, 04:06 AM
Yipes!

Kinda like PopCorn, only ( a lot ) faster?


Glad you are Okay..!

Gryffydd
April 8, 2010, 04:39 AM
This problem could have been avoided with a visit to www.dillonprecision.com
What exactly is in that Blue Koolaid? Must be some strong stuff!

To the OP, thanks for reminding people that this CAN and does happen.

I do wonder though, anybody had this happen with a Loadmaster? Though it doesn't have a tube it also doesn't have (by default) a shield of any kind. I'd be interested to see someone use a tray type system, but out of good materials instead of crappy plastic with mould flashing all over.

EddieNFL
April 8, 2010, 08:59 AM
This must be an internet myth as I was recently assured it was impossible for primers to mass detonate. <end sarcasm>

What exactly is in that Blue Koolaid? Must be some strong stuff!

It is. I've sipped other colors since my first taste, but there is always something missing.

kestak
April 8, 2010, 09:27 AM
Greetings,

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EPcBpF6DTWk

Thank you
P.S.: I felt the same way with my lubing blunder....

spiritz
April 8, 2010, 09:52 AM
Wow - Glad you are okay.
I am relatively new to reloading.
I have been using a single stage for about a year now, but upgraded to a LNL like yours.
Your incident (especially with picture) really makes a point...

thanks...

ric426
April 8, 2010, 10:04 AM
Wow. Glad things weren't any worse and you weren't injured. Looks like there could have been some serious shrapnel!
I just set up my new LnL AP a week ago, but I've got a few hundred cases that I'd already hand primed so I haven't used the decapping or priming system yet. I've also got 3 thousand Federal small pistol primers waiting to be used. I think my hand primer will be getting used at least until all the Federal primers are used up (even though Lee says not to use Federal primers in that either). If I were to set off a tube of primers at my press in the basement and they went through the ceiling, they'd be sticking through the kitchen floor and I'd find my reloading gear (and probably everything else I own) relocated to the pole barn before the smoke even cleared and we peeled our neurotic dog off the ceiling
So if you're not supposed to use Federal primers in stacking tubes or primers trays, what are you supposed to do? I can picture the corporate lawyers recommending a bomb squad suit and a pair of long tongs to pick the primers out of the tray one at a time... :scrutiny:

This kind of puts a damper on my plans for a steam powered reloading system.

nofishbob
April 8, 2010, 10:30 AM
Just for another data point, I have used thousands of Federal primers in my LNL progressive pres without an incident.

My press feeds the primers reliably and smoothly...why would there be a problem?

If your press is roughing up the primers, I would humbly suggest to adjust your press reather than seek more robust primers.

Good luck!

Bob

Hondo 60
April 8, 2010, 10:36 AM
GJgo,
Thank you for posting this. I'm very glad you're safe & proud of you for posting a "not so bright" moment in hopes it keeps someone else safe.

Here is a shining example of why I come to THR on a daily basis. The willingness to share ideas & tips of the great & not so great variety is second to none!

Blind Bat
April 8, 2010, 10:59 AM
I think the primer feed system on the current generation (EZ-ject) LNL's is the only low point. I'd bet the next generation will have an updated primer system.

My main problem is that even the smallest ammount of powder under the slider arm will jam the slider. I usually remove the shell plate and slider every two loading sessions to blow out any stray flakes. I'm also going to polish the plunger and slider hole (giggle) when I have some free time.

(Serious, not sarcastic) I would be interested to know how the Dillon system is better.

jeepmor
April 8, 2010, 11:07 AM
Thanks for putting you humility aside and sharing your safety incident. Good learning here.

I never popped a primer in my LNL, but I did tear it down and chamfer the parts as you said you should have done.

floydster
April 8, 2010, 11:10 AM
After four months of trying to get the primer system working on my new LNL I finally gave up, in my opinion, it is a bad design all the way around and my direct line to Hornady was to no avail.

I prime on my Lee cast turret, it's great!!!

If I had to do it again, I would buy a Dillon.

GW Staar
April 8, 2010, 12:41 PM
Balrog said,as usual,This problem could have been avoided with a visit to www.dillonprecision.com


Actually their primer system isn't any safer than Hornady's.
Do check Dillon.com, but go here: http://www.dillonprecision.com/PrimerExplosion-98-11-632.htm

RCBS also shared the danger...which is why they invented the APS system.
They recognized that nobody can be a perfect reloader, all of the time. We are all just waiting for the next...or in some cases...the first slip.;)

I wonder if Dillon replaced his ear drums and repaired the ceiling.

Jason
April 8, 2010, 01:33 PM
I've found the primer seater punch has a tendency to collect metal shavings underneath its head on a LNL press. This causes the punch head to stick up just enough to jam the primer slide. Try unscrewing the seater punch from the underside of press, remove the little e-clip that holds it together and give it a good cleaning. Glad your OK.

Otto
April 8, 2010, 01:58 PM
What exactly is sticking in the ceiling, the primer feed tube or the primer tube housing? Is it both pieces?
One other question, were you wearing eye protection?

Cosmoline
April 8, 2010, 03:24 PM
Wow, more reason why I am happy to hand prime my cases!

Ditto that. Never trusted that many in a tube

351 WINCHESTER
April 8, 2010, 03:53 PM
I've had a healthy respect for primers from an incident when I was about 15. I had just bought my first deer rifle, a Remington 700adl in .243. Then I bought this mini tourch and was wondering if it would get hot enough to melt the brass case from which I had pulled the bullet and dumped the powder. I placed the "empty" case on my desk and fired up the tourch. I don't recall how hot the case got, but I didn't even think about the primer. It blew and sent the case up into the ceiling and the primer went thru the top of my desk and landed in the drawer underneath. My ears were ringing and my eyes were real fuzzy. Mom was home and she came running to my bedroom fussing with me, what the heck happened?

Now that's a lesson I will never forget.

earplug
April 8, 2010, 04:20 PM
I was in a building when a tube of primers blew.
This is one of the reasons why I like the RCBS primer strip system.

David Wile
April 8, 2010, 04:51 PM
Hey folks,

My LNL AP has the same parts that came with it in 1997. There has been no primer upgrade or EZ-Ject added to it. Like Nofishbob, I have also used thousands of Federal primers without any incident like described in this thread. My press, like Nofishbob's, feeds all primers smoothly as long as it is maintained properly and kept clean. Let a piece of powder drop in the slide, and it will hang up. This happens rarely, but when it does, I do not just keep pushing the handle. I can recognize by feel when there is something interfering with the shuttle, and I stop to fix it. Sounds like Bob does the same thing.

Best wishes,
Dave Wile

W.E.G.
April 8, 2010, 06:14 PM
Should have scrubbed the launch with the ceiling that low.

SlamFire1
April 8, 2010, 09:57 PM
Thanks for posting. There are so many people who have claimed in so many threads that primers will not explode in a priming tube.

You know the types: "prove its unsafe!"

Maybe the picture will provide a rebuttal. :D

EddieNFL
April 8, 2010, 10:28 PM
Thanks for posting. There are so many people who have claimed in so many threads that primers will not explode in a priming tube.

You know the types: "prove its unsafe!"

Maybe the picture will provide a rebuttal. :D
Yeah, but they don't detonate on their own. Kind of like a negligent discharge.

fields
April 8, 2010, 10:53 PM
Stick it back up there! You will have a great reminder what not to do, and also a conversation piece.

richard

creepiE
April 8, 2010, 11:00 PM
Glad you are safe. Thanks for the heads up!

GJgo
April 8, 2010, 11:24 PM
HAHA maybe I'll stick it in the ceiling for posterity!

Since I have owned this press (about 3 years) I have only ever used Federal primers in it. Reason being most of my reloading on it is for S&W revolvers, and I don't trust them (personal experience) to ALWAYS light harder primers. I've loaded thousands of rounds on it with the Federal primers and this was my first "incident". As I said sometimes small primers were a little "sticky" but it never really hung up. my suspicion in hindsight was that there was probably some FOD in there that was exacerbating the problem- I'll be doing a thourough cleaning (to clean the burn marks!) in addition to chamfering that hole. I bet that'll smooth it up and I'll continue on my way, right after I buy a new primer feed tube of course...

BigJakeJ1s
April 9, 2010, 12:26 AM
Someone's been into the blue koolaid again...

If anything the Dillon 650 priming system is more prone than any other to set off the tube, as reported with alarming regularity. The 550 and LNL AP priming system at least have a large separation between the primer being seated (where most detonations occur) and the rest of the primers in the tube. Only if one goes off at the bottom of the tube (much more rare) does it set the tube off. The 650, on the other hand, has a disk with several primers leading a chain-reaction path from the priming station back to the tube. One problem at either end on a 650, and ka-boom!

Both Dillon and Hornady have tubular blast shields that safely direct the blast up and away from you. The lee plastic tray does not, so it will send primer pieces and shards of plastic everywhere when it goes off (and they do go off occasionally, otherwise, I'm sure Mr Lee would have no need to sell an optional blast shield for it.)

Andy

thorn-
April 9, 2010, 12:57 AM
Couple things...

This is the first time i've ever seen a chain fire on a LNL-AP. Until now, I'd only seen it happen with Dillons and maybe(?) Lee. Good to know it's possible, as I'll continue to use extra care. So I do appreciate your post, and glad there was no injury.

Secondly - "get a dillon" is just a strange comment. As noted above, the first time i heard about primer tube explosions it WAS with dillons.

Finally - I've reloading thousands of rounds on a LNL. Never had a single mishap, although I've only used CCI and Win. I'm a bit mystified by comments that believe the LNL priming system needs an overhaul. Yes, powder flakes can be a problem... but I don't really see that as a significant flaw. If you spill powder on the shell plate, you should be stopping down and cleaning it anyway. Canned air works great for this.

thorn

Publius1688
April 9, 2010, 02:40 AM
Wow. Glad you are safe. My wife would've killed me if the primers didn't!
This just reinforces my decision to hand prime only. I ain't in that big of a hurry.

sonick808
April 9, 2010, 04:25 AM
wow, that is fricking scary :\ i hate dealing with primers. the cumulative nature is impressive. It does look funny sticking in your ceilign though... laughing now only because you're OK.... thank god for that blast shield.

A gentleman mentioned vacuuming a live primer..... i did that a couple nights ago for the first and last time. LOL. Blew the fan of my 12 amp eureka Bravo II clean in half, and i SAW the flash through the bag somehow. That was wild.

qajaq59
April 9, 2010, 06:18 AM
That's like one of the Red Neck jokes. "Hey, watch this........."

You may have saved someone an eye or a finger in the future by fessing up to it though, so I'm glad you did.

EddieNFL
April 9, 2010, 08:59 AM
If anything the Dillon 650 priming system is more prone than any other to set off the tube, as reported with alarming regularity.

The primer to be seated is more than an inch away from the tube. Also, the cup is surrounded by steel and the anvil is covered by the primer pocket. The adjacent primers are completely surrounded.

Is it possible for one to propagate to the next? Anything is possible.

The 550 and LNL AP priming system at least have a large separation between the primer being seated (where most detonations occur) and the rest of the primers in the tube.

Apparently not enough.

FirearmsEnthusiast
April 9, 2010, 09:10 AM
Well, lucky you didn't cause yourself a serious injury.

nofishbob
April 9, 2010, 09:20 AM
EddieNFL wrote:
Quote:
The 550 and LNL AP priming system at least have a large separation between the primer being seated (where most detonations occur) and the rest of the primers in the tube.
Apparently not enough.

I can't see how the OP's mishap occurred during the primer seating operation. Too much steel and brass and distance between the primer being seated and the primer tube.

I bet there was some sort of crunching going on as the primer shuttle attempted to slide the primer out of the bottom of the primer tube, placing the detonation right at the bottom of the primer tube.

Bob

EddieNFL
April 9, 2010, 09:40 AM
I can't see how the OP's mishap occurred during the primer seating operation. Too much steel and brass and distance between the primer being seated and the primer tube.

Neither can I. I was quoting someone else. I have a Hornady Projector, a 550 and a 650. While anything is possible, I doubt crunching a primer while seating would mass detonate the stack in the tube. As I mentioned above, they don't just self ignite; something had to initiate the first one (hint: loader made a mistake).

David Wile
April 9, 2010, 10:35 AM
Hey Nofishbob,

I think your point is well taken. What has been described just doesn't make sense. I am not suggesting the OP was not telling the truth, just that his observation of what happened may be incorrect. I would like to know what Hornady would have to say about the incident, and I am wondering why the OP did not go to Hornady first rather than the internet?

Best wishes,
Dave Wile

Sport45
April 9, 2010, 10:53 AM
I am wondering why the OP did not go to Hornady first rather than the internet?

Probably because he knew the manual that came with his press said:

If at any time during operation you feel like you are forcing the press, stop and identify the problem. Do not force anything, because damage will occur. Powders and Primers are explosive if handled carelessly! Always work slowly and carefully without distractions and wear eye protection.

LnL AP Manual (http://www.hornady.com/assets/files/manuals-current/metalic-reloading/LNL_AP.pdf)

GJgo
April 9, 2010, 11:01 AM
Bob is correct. The detonation happened because I stupidly tried racking the shuttle as a means to un-stick it from hanging up on the bottom of the primer tube. The 12" fireball came right out the top of the blast tube when all 95 primers lit of instantaneously.

I didn't go to Hornady because it's not their problem- it's mine and I fessed up to it. Besides, when I have gone to them before about the primer seating punch not being long enough after eating through the powdercoat and into the aluminum they pretty much blew me off.

snuffy
April 9, 2010, 04:05 PM
If anything the Dillon 650 priming system is more prone than any other to set off the tube, as reported with alarming regularity. The 550 and LNL AP priming system at least have a large separation between the primer being seated (where most detonations occur) and the rest of the primers in the tube. Only if one goes off at the bottom of the tube (much more rare) does it set the tube off. The 650, on the other hand, has a disk with several primers leading a chain-reaction path from the priming station back to the tube. One problem at either end on a 650, and ka-boom!


I trust my dillon 650 priming system to NOT fire the entire tube full of primers. Although I have to accept it has happened, I'm pretty sure I know why. The primer being seated is NOT the one that initiates the tube to blow. What happens is a missing shell in the prime station causes a primer to hang up in the disk at an angle to be crushed when the disk rotates back under the supply tube. The primer is SUPPOSED to fall out of the disk to be collected in a little chute. On my machine, the primer disk had a few tiny burrs in the holes that the primers travel in from the tube to the priming station. Some careful polishing corrected the problem. I still watch to see for sure if the primer drops clear when the case feeder fails to drop a case, resulting in no shell in position to be primed.

Gjgo, glad you're okay. And thanks for telling about it, it's hard to stand back and be berated for being stubborn or the testosterone "effect". Sort of like the English with their " damn the torpedoes, full speed ahead"!

BigJakeJ1s
April 9, 2010, 11:58 PM
The pictures I saw of a blown up 650 priming system clearly showed the primers in the disk, including at the priming station, went off. The cover piece over the transfer disk was deformed and blackened, and it looked like it bent back towards the priming tube, perhaps indicating the priming station went off first, and chain reacted across the disk, over to the tube. Whichever one goes first, the whole disk will go, and it is not as safely shielded or vented as the tube is, so it is more likely to hit you with shrapnel than the 550 and LNL AP priming systems are.

Andy

mdemetz
April 10, 2010, 07:54 AM
Here is a recent thread on doing it wih a Dillon;
INGO (http://ingunowners.com/forums/ammunition_and_reloading/84669-anyone_blow_up_their_dillon_reloader.html)

G36Rick
April 10, 2010, 12:38 PM
I stay away from any primer tubes,way too dangerous !!! use a hand primer or the Lee Safety prime.Stacking primers in a tube is like having your mother in law staying for a month.Sooner or later things will ignite!!!!! LOL!

snuffy
April 10, 2010, 01:28 PM
I stay away from any primer tubes,way too dangerous !!! use a hand primer or the Lee Safety prime.Stacking primers in a tube is like having your mother in law staying for a month.Sooner or later things will ignite!!!!! LOL!

Then G36Rick, you obviously don't load on a progressive! It's a necessary evil with most of them. If you hand prime while using a progressive, you have defeated the speed you can achieve using one. Like loading wearing handcuffs!:what:

Like I said, any gorilla can destroy anything by forcing the press handle when they feel resistance causing the primer to detonate. I've crushed primers quite a few times when a malfunctioning primer feeder puts one in sideways, never had one pop.

Oh and I use federal LP primers in my lee auto hand primer and my dillon 650. I do think I'll move the florescent light from directly above the primer tube though!:rolleyes::uhoh:

David Wile
April 10, 2010, 01:32 PM
Hey G36Rick,

After reading your, "I stay away from any primer tubes,way too dangerous !!!", I am certainly tempted to comment on same. However, those old words keep coming to my head about the idea that if you have nothing nice to say about someone or something, you really should say nothing at all.

There were a pretty fair number of folks killed riding in cars and on motorcycles last week, but we still go out this week and use our cars and motorcycles without even thinking about all the folk who were killed in them the week before.

Best wishes,
Dave Wile

EddieNFL
April 10, 2010, 01:50 PM
I just removed the primer mechanism from my 650 to take a closer look. Anything is possible, but for the primers in the disk to sympathetically detonate, the moon stars and planets would have to be aligned. If it happened I don't see an anvil penetrating the platform, shellholder, primer feedbody housing or indexing arm. The only primer not completely enclosed is the one under the feedar. It is about 30 or so percent exposed. It's possible the anvil could escape through the gap between the arm and the shellplate. It would have to cut through the arm. The primer tube is encased by less metal than the those in the disk.

There are odds for anything.

45ACPUSER
April 10, 2010, 07:54 PM
After four months of trying to get the primer system working on my new LNL I finally gave up, in my opinion, it is a bad design all the way around and my direct line to Hornady was to no avail.

I prime on my Lee cast turret, it's great!!!

If I had to do it again, I would buy a Dillon.

Wow now that is funny, them free bullets sure were attractive.....NOT worth it!

G36Rick
April 10, 2010, 08:28 PM
Wow...Didn't mean to ruffle feathers Mr Wile...Didn't mean to offend Dillon owners ect,or anyone for that matter. I certainly think you took it out of context. Perhaps I should have said "In my opinion"...I stand corrected, and humbly apologize...(ok, is this guy a plant from politically correct.com? Or is his mother in law visiting)Lighten up Mr Wile,I'm sorry you did not see my humor or light heartiness with my mother-in law pun,in a however potentially dangerous situation.
Best Regards and Happy Safe Reloading,
Richard

David Wile
April 10, 2010, 08:36 PM
Hey 45ACPUSER,

I don't see one thing funny in repeating the sad words Floydster said in his post on Page 2. Floydster has had problems with his press from the time he first bought it, and I can feel his pain and frustration every times he writes about the problems he has had. There have been over 25,000 of the Hornady LNL presses sold since 1997, and most folks are able to make them work quite well.

People sure are different. Floydster writes tha he has problems with his press and is obviously very frustrated. I am certain that if I lived near him, I could get him and his press working just fine, and I regret that I am unable to help him. You read the same words of frustration from Floydster, and you not only state that you think it is funny, but you have to rub salt in his wounds about his purchase not being worth it.

If he were having the same problems and frustrations with a Dillon 650, would you be so quick to tell everyone how bad a deal Floydster made on it?




Hey Floydster,

I still wish you could find someone near you with a LNL to give you a hand in getting it right.

Best wishes,
Dave Wile

David Wile
April 10, 2010, 08:45 PM
Hey Richard,

No, my mother-in-law is not visiting. While she died a few years ago at the age of 99, I always enjoyed her company and certainly would not mind having her around still. If your mother-in-law is not so enjoyable, my sympathies go out to you. If your post is characteristic of your peception of humor, I would suggest you keep you day job.

Best wishes,
Dave Wile

ReloaderFred
April 10, 2010, 09:38 PM
Well, this thread went south in a hurry.............

Fred

G36Rick
April 10, 2010, 09:52 PM
Yup sure did...Seems like Mr. Wile has a comment for everything.I think I'll stick to reloading and deter the humor altogether.Sorry for trying to put a smile on others faces,whether being a tad off color/sarcastic.My bad...and Mr Wile,again lighten up.You sound like an angry old fella :-)

thorn-
April 11, 2010, 12:07 AM
I personally think the thread started going south when it was suggested to get a dillon. It went further south when progressive priming was deemed too dangerous (and hand priming is the only safe alternative). I think the mother-in-law joke was just finally the icing on the cake to having so many comments that had not much to do with the issue at hand.

thorn

Roccobro
April 11, 2010, 01:32 AM
I personally think the thread started going south when it was suggested to get a dillon. It went further south when progressive priming was deemed too dangerous (and hand priming is the only safe alternative).

Agreed.

I bit my tongue twice but it still went from bad to worse. :(

Justin

Balrog
April 11, 2010, 01:38 AM
Hey I was just trying to be funny when I mentioned Dillon earlier, I forgot what a sensitive group you Hornady guys are ...
Its possible to do something stupid with any press.

Ala Dan
April 22, 2010, 11:29 PM
I have used all types of Federal primers since the fall of '72, without any
issues. They have worked very well, all those years. I'm very careful [and
mindful] when handloading; especially when handling primers. I see NO real
reason too change now~! :scrutiny::uhoh:

dc.fireman
April 23, 2010, 12:44 AM
I'm thinking now that I'm going to go pull the priming system on my 1050, just for piece of mind, and give the whole thing a good cleaning. Thanks for sharing GJ - I learned something from it.

-tc

1858
April 23, 2010, 12:54 AM
I stay away from any primer tubes,way too dangerous !!!

I've been reloading since '92 and for the past 18 years have used an RCBS RockChucker (single stage press) and an RCBS PiggyBack II on an RCBS RockChucker (conversion to a progressive press) to load tens of thousands of rounds. Both systems use primer tubes and I've never had one go off. I do wear safety glasses just in case but I simply don't see any way of setting off the whole tube short of dropping it. Sadly, RCBS has seen fit to do away with the primer tube system that I've been using for all these years. They no longer use the same system on their newer presses. I hope I never have to upgrade my presses!

:)

kestak
April 23, 2010, 08:10 AM
Greetings,

Used around 40k primers in my Dillon 550B with primer tubes, never got one going bank.

Thank you

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