.45 mystery bullet


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maxxwilde
April 8, 2010, 04:36 PM
I'm fairly certain I know the answer to this question, but I want to check my facts and make sure I've researched it correctly.
Among the reloading equipment I inherited when my dad passed away was a box of bullets. Their marked "45-250" and listed as "copper plated". I checked the diameter and their .452 and 250 grains. Am I correct in that these cannot be loaded into a .45ACP? In all the looking I only found .452 diameter bullets for .45 ACP to be of lead, and not copper plated.
As you can guess I havent reloaded much, but I'm semi comfortable with the basic's. I don't want to start loading obscure loading for the .45 ACP until i know more of what I'm doing. I like my fingers and eyes just where they are =-)
Thank you for reading!


Mike

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rcmodel
April 8, 2010, 04:40 PM
Most likely they are for a .45 Colt revolver.
Especially if they are SWC or RN-FP design.

It is possible to load 250 grain bullets in the .45 ACP, but the heaviest standard bullet for it is a 230 round nose.

Load data will be scarce for a 250 in .45 ACP.

rc

maxxwilde
April 8, 2010, 04:57 PM
Ahh, that makes sense, he didn't own anything in .45 acp. I'm new enough that if I cant find load data in several places I just figure it's a BAD idea LOL
So if it IS possible, the .452 diameter wont be a problem? Most of the .45 ACP loads I'm seeing list the bullet diamter at .451. I know, it's a very small ammount but I'm just trying to sort some things out in my head.
Thank you for the answer!


Mike

rcmodel
April 8, 2010, 05:08 PM
.452" would be standard .45 ACP dia. for lead or plated bullets.
.451" for conventional jacketed bullets.

Depending on the bullet design, you might be able to get them to feed in a auto pistol.

What are they, SWC, RN-FP, TC, RN?

rc

maxxwilde
April 8, 2010, 05:41 PM
Ok, "plated" bullets I somehow missed that. Now I understand about the diameter issue.
It's a flat nose bullet. VERY close to some of the 185 grain 45acp's I load up. Assuming their not too long, I think they might actually chamber just fine. The length would be the only problem I can see as I'd have to seat 'em pretty deep. Hmm, now I'm curious what they'd shoot like!


Mike

rick300
April 9, 2010, 05:26 PM
I'm also new but if you seat them deeper you will increase pressure. be safe Rick

Jesse Heywood
April 9, 2010, 07:25 PM
I'm new enough that if I cant find load data in several places I just figure it's a BAD idea LOL

That's actually using some common sense!

I am not recommending you load them for a 45 ACP, I don't know enough about the round to say. But, if you decide to load them, first try loading a couple of dummy rounds to get the length right and ensure they will feed manually.

maxxwilde
April 11, 2010, 10:34 PM
Rick300 said: I'm also new but if you seat them deeper you will increase pressure. be safe Rick

Yup. And as I found out when I went back and took a closer look at them they arent as close in dimensions on the nose as the 185 grains I mentioned above. To get the cartridge to to work I'd have to seat it pretty deep. I know 45 acp is a pretty low prrassure round but it makes me wonder.


M

maxxwilde
April 11, 2010, 10:43 PM
Jesse Heywood said: That's actually using some common sense!

I am not recommending you load them for a 45 ACP, I don't know enough about the round to say. But, if you decide to load them, first try loading a couple of dummy rounds to get the length right and ensure they will feed manually.

Thank you! I've always looked at it like this, theres a fine line between safe intelligent reloading, and being that dumb redneck who blows off a few fingers out in the middle of the desert. All it takes is one accident.
If I did decide to reload them, I always make a test round first to get the dimensions correct. That way I can measure it, make sure it feeds and drop it in the barel to make sure it's headspacing correctly.
Thank's to RC above I've been looking around and actually found a few sources. I'm kinda tempted to try, to be honest. I'll bet the recoil would be a bit more than I like though, I'm liking my 185 grain 45's.


Mike

454PB
April 12, 2010, 01:47 PM
You can use a bullet as heavy as 260 grains in .45 ACP, but it is not something I'd recommend for a newbie.

Plated bullets are quite ductile and very similar to cast bullets, and .452" is not a problem.

If you haven't slugged the barrel on you .45 ACP, you may want to do that. Some .45 ACP actually have .452" bores and shoot better with the larger bullet.

maxxwilde
April 16, 2010, 11:40 AM
454PB said: You can use a bullet as heavy as 260 grains in .45 ACP, but it is not something I'd recommend for a newbie.

Plated bullets are quite ductile and very similar to cast bullets, and .452" is not a problem.

If you haven't slugged the barrel on you .45 ACP, you may want to do that. Some .45 ACP actually have .452" bores and shoot better with the larger bullet.

Advice taken. I'm curious what they'd shoot like, but not so curious as too try something possibly dangerous at the moment. Besides, I just got 500 semi wadcutters in 185 grains from Missouri bullets to play with LOL

Out of curiosity though, why is it not something you'd recomend? I have a feeling it's one of those "If you have to ask you aren't ready to do it" question's, but I'm still wondering.

So THATS what slugging a barrel is for! I've always wondered, thanks for clearing it up. I'm gonna look into it. The new 185 semi wadcutters I just got are .452 so I'm wondering if I'll get any improved accuracy...

Thank you for the info!


M

snuffy
April 16, 2010, 02:40 PM
Loading 250 grain bullets in 45 acp is no big deal. You DO have to have the right components, and a little experience.

I wanted to try shooting a bowling pin match. I didn't even have a semi-auto pistol, but my boss at the gunshop did! His old 1911 colt 45 acp was borrowed to me, along with some old data he had worked up for it using a 250 semi-wadcutter lead bullet load. It used Alliant blu-dot powder. No, I don't remember the amount, the velocity, or the seating depth. The bullet would have been used in 45 long colt revolver loads.

What I DO remember was the recoil,(more than with standard loads), AND the fact that the load shot 6 inches high @ the distance from the firing line to the pins!:what:(fixed sights). I HAD to shoot an inch below the base of the pin to center it!

Why the heavy SWC? The theory was that a round nose bullet can skip off the pins, not bite into the wood. Pins must be knocked off the back of the table to score. Those big SWC bullets did a great job of clearing the pins off the table. Drawback is the recovery from the extra recoil limited how quickly I could get back on target for the next pin!

I just cast some 250 SWC bullets for my 1911 45 acp. I plan to load some to try to duplicate that load from so many years ago. If I getarountoit, I'll post the results on this thread.

454PB
April 16, 2010, 03:38 PM
If you decide to work up a load, stay away from the fast burning powders that are normally used in .45 ACP. I prefer Unique, HS-6, Bluedot, Herco, etc.

When I was doing this, I used a Lyman 454190 sized to .452". That is the original factory load bullet design for the .45 Colt, weighs around 260 grains in wheelweight alloy, and has a rounded nose with a small meplat. Seating depth is critical, so once you find the COL that feeds well in your gun, use it exclusively.....never shorter!

Work up in very small increments, and watch for battering of the slide and frame. The heavy weights can be hard on the gun if used extensively.

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