Popularity of snub nosed revolvers.


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emilianoksa
April 11, 2010, 10:35 PM
I know they're still very popular, but I just wondered if there were members of this forum, who tried them, and couldn't get on with them.

I've never had a chance to shoot one, but know they are very difficult to master.

What is the effective range of a snub in double action for the average shooter? 5 to 10 yards?

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Nushif
April 11, 2010, 10:45 PM
Darned. You're looking for someone who doesn't shoot them ... 8(

I can hit a pop can at about ... 20 yards with my fifth round after spraying up dirt all around it first and have been shooting it for about ... four months now? All DA, of course, since mine doesn't have SA.
And let me tell you, I'm not a good shot. So they can't be all that hard to shoot. 8)

David E
April 11, 2010, 10:47 PM
Why be satisfied with "average?"

The gun can make hits on mansize targets out to 50 yds and well beyond. It's not hard, but it does require a bit of practice.

This was at about 5 yds, starting with gun at high ready, reacting to a start signal:

http://i59.photobucket.com/albums/g311/Sooper1/Shooting%20Related%20Things/DSCF0001.jpg

Here's a 25 yd target casually fired double action with my Charter Arms .38 snubby. It's not especially impressive, but they're all kill shots.

http://i59.photobucket.com/albums/g311/Sooper1/Shooting%20Related%20Things/Cropped30yd.jpg

Sorry, I didn't do any FoF training on this particular range outing......

GRIZ22
April 11, 2010, 11:00 PM
What is the effective range of a snub in double action for the average shooter? 5 to 10 yards?

That depends on the shooter and what you call average. Many LE qualification courses require some shootin at 25 yds DA so there was some criteria that needed to be met at that range for the "average" LEO. The best I have ever done DA is with a S&W 640 (DAO, 2" barrel) about a 12" group at 100 yd. I know many that can do better.

I'd say if you can't hit center of mass on a silhouette at 25 yds (8-12" depending on the target0 you need to practice more or carry something you can shoot better.

And let me tell you, I'm not a good shot. So they can't be all that hard to shoot.

Nushif, it appears from your description you're meeting the criteria I stated. You may be a better shot the you think you are and are a better shot than what I've seen others deem "acceptable".

c919
April 11, 2010, 11:06 PM
I'll leave it at this...

There's nothing quite like the feel of 25 oz of cold SP101 steel in your hand to let you know that you are covered (at the range and on the street).

Ol' KL
April 11, 2010, 11:10 PM
I had a chance to play around with a scandium S&W (Hammer 1.75")...loved it. It is the only gun I've ever carried that I could put in a pocket and forget is was there.

It will bark with .357. I'm not especially offended by handgun recoil. I thought it was fine with .38s. I shot a box of 50 .357s at one sitting...all I wanted.

It had a crimson trace on it and with a little concentration you could kill a rabbit at 15-25yrds.

noob_shooter
April 11, 2010, 11:17 PM
what is the proper name... snubby?

My question is....... The barrel is so short so how does the rifling even function well enough for the bullet to even spin to provide accuracy?

shockwave
April 11, 2010, 11:20 PM
how does the rifling even function well enough for the bullet to even spin to provide accuracy?

The barrel is pushed up into the opponent's face or stomach and you pull the trigger repeatedly blasting cartridges into the person's body as many times as you can.

GRIZ22
April 11, 2010, 11:29 PM
My question is....... The barrel is so short so how does the rifling even function well enough for the bullet to even spin to provide accuracy?

Yes and there is enough spin to keep the bullet stabilzed for some distance (100+ yards) depending on the bulet weight and velocity. A 148 gr target wadcutter load will show some keyholing out of a 2" at 50 yards and that's the worst I ever seen.

bluetopper
April 11, 2010, 11:50 PM
Just a slight bullet spin helps to stabilize bullet flight immensely over just being blasted out of a smooth bore.

I equate a bullet coming out of a smooth bore to a pitcher throwing a knuckle ball.

Nushif
April 11, 2010, 11:53 PM
The idea is to pull it out real quick and blast the guy at real short range repeatedly. They're not exactly range guns. Comparing them to a range gun is far too common.

ChristopherG
April 11, 2010, 11:57 PM
The fit between the metal of the bullet--either lead or copper, if it is jacketed or plated--and the much harder steel of the barrel is very tight. As the bullet is forced into the barrel by the tremendous pressure of the explosive gasses behind it, it is swaged into the pattern of the hard rifled barrel (the high parts called lands and the low parts called grooves). Though the barrel is very short--as little as 1 7/8 inches for a classic S&W .38 'snubby'--the bullet is forced to spin at the precise rate of twist determined by the barrel, whether the barrel is 1" long or 30". All a longer barrel does is provide a longer time for the explosive gasses to propel the bullet, and thus provide greater velocity. Mechanically, a short barrel may actually be more accurate (though in practical terms this is hard to take advantage of because the sights on a snubby are so close together they are relatively imprecise).

You don't just 'jam it in your opponent's face'. A trick (i.e., very skilled) shooter like Bob Munden can do amazing shots at 100 yards with a snubby.

e.g.,

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6_b3dAbKoJ0

jmortimer
April 12, 2010, 12:27 AM
I practice at 7 yards and can put all 5 in a 4" group in 2 seconds. Obviously not good but good enough. I have not tried 25 yards but believe I could get all five on a paper plate (center mass - +/- 8" to 10 ") in two seconds as well. That is good enough for me. I also believe I could hit a target/torso if I took my time out to 50 yards.

David E
April 12, 2010, 12:43 AM
I have not tried 25 yards but believe I could get all five on a paper plate (center mass - +/- 8" to 10 ") in two seconds as well.

I'd have to see that.

If you can shoot a 4" group at 7 yds in 2 seconds and think you can shoot an 8" group at 25 yds in 2 seconds......then you're shooting too slow at 7 yds.

Instead of "believing" what you can do, why not go out and SEE what you can do?

Balrog
April 12, 2010, 12:44 AM
The best I have ever done DA is with a S&W 640 (DAO, 2" barrel) about a 12" group at 100 yd. I know many that can do better.

I do not think it would ever occur to me to try shooting a snub nose revolver at 100 yards.

David E
April 12, 2010, 12:46 AM
I do not think it would ever occur to me to try shooting a snub nose revolver at 100 yards.

Next time out, give it a try. I bet you'll be surprised at how well you do !

ZeBool
April 12, 2010, 12:51 AM
I bought my girlfriend a model 642 for Christmas. Very nice and well-made revolver. In theory, it was the pefrect gun for her. However, try as she might, she couldn't shoot or get used to the gun. After 20 rounds her hand would begin to become sore, and after that there was no point in continuing to shoot. I even had the same problem with it. We sold it and bought her a Kahr MK9. She shoots it well and loves it dearly.

Balrog
April 12, 2010, 12:56 AM
Next time out, give it a try. I bet you'll be surprised at how well you do !

No I dont think I will. I see no point.

David E
April 12, 2010, 01:05 AM
No I dont think I will. I see no point.

One "point" is to have fun doing it !

Another is to open your eyes about how capable snub guns can be.

Yet another is to expand your understanding about how these guns work at distance, if only to learn that they are much more than mere belly guns, good only for shootouts in elevators.

Or don't. It doesn't matter to me!

M2 Carbine
April 12, 2010, 01:22 AM
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I know they're still very popular, but I just wondered if there were members of this forum, who tried them, and couldn't get on with them.

I've never had a chance to shoot one, but know they are very difficult to master.

What is the effective range of a snub in double action for the average shooter? 5 to 10 yards?
Don't believe everything you hear.

First off they are not difficult to master. As shown by this young lady that within about an hour, on her FIRST DAY shooting was shooting the S&W J Frame while on the move, right, left and backpeddling, and putting all but a few shots COM. Then at 10 yards she put all 5 shots almost touching in the target's head.
And that was the first time she had ever touched a gun.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v135/Bell406_206B/Lindseyandbuck.jpg

5 to 10 yards effective range?:D
How about 50 plus yards.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v135/Bell406_206B/52yards38Smith.jpg
52 yards. Standing, two hands. SA As I recall there were two misses.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v135/Bell406_206B/52yards38Smith2.jpg
And a 3 inch barrel DA. Again a couple misses.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v135/Bell406_206B/38DA50yards5misses.jpg



100 yards.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v135/Bell406_206B/100yardkimbershooting3.jpg
No misses with the J Frame but this was cheating, shooting while sitting down.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v135/Bell406_206B/SWmod60100yards.jpg

David E
April 12, 2010, 01:23 AM
They're not exactly range guns.

the GUN can do it.........but can you do it with your gun?

Next time out, try some long range shooting. Ideally, where you can spot your misses. Once you get dialed in, you'll surprise yourself at how well you do.

And your name doesn't have to be Bob or Jerry.

stealth
April 12, 2010, 01:40 AM
.. Thank you, ChristopherG!

M2 Carbine
April 12, 2010, 01:47 AM
No I dont think I will. I see no point.
You would be suprised how well these folks did when they went back to under 25 yards after I had them shooting and hitting a foot square target at 52 yards.
After shooting COM at 50 yards, COM at 15 yards looks as big as a barn door.:D

The target is the white square (12x12 inches).
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v135/Bell406_206B/50yardsNat3.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v135/Bell406_206B/30yardsScott.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v135/Bell406_206B/50yardsBrent2.jpg

M2 Carbine
April 12, 2010, 02:05 AM
The best I have ever done DA is with a S&W 640 (DAO, 2" barrel) about a 12" group at 100 yd. I know many that can do better.

And let me tell you, I'm not a good shot. So they can't be all that hard to shoot.

Don't be so modest.
Anyone that can put 5 shots inside 12 inches at 100 yards using a DA 2 inch revolver is a DAMNED GOOD shot in any shooting circles.

This target is about 48 inches high, so that's about like getting all head shots at 100 yard with a 2 inch J Frame. Heck I have trouble just seeing the head.:D
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v135/Bell406_206B/100yardkimbershooting3.jpg

svaz
April 12, 2010, 02:36 AM
I've had a snubbie but I just didn't care for it. Maybe it was the balance? I didn't care for that 2" barrel and the frame-heavy feel. I have always liked the look and feel of the SP101 3", but I've never owned one.

chriske
April 12, 2010, 03:33 AM
My average (on a good day) is about 3 " groups at 15 meters with either a 2" S&W Mod 15 (6 shot group) or a 2 " S&W Mod 640 (5 shot group)
On a not-so-good-day, add one flyer per group, enlarging it by 1 to 2 inches
On a really bad day, I can't shoot worth anything , not even with a 6" S&W mod 17.

Drako
April 12, 2010, 07:06 AM
I know they're still very popular, but I just wondered if there were members of this forum, who tried them, and couldn't get on with them.

I've never had a chance to shoot one, but know they are very difficult to master.

What is the effective range of a snub in double action for the average shooter? 5 to 10 yards?
The snub nose revolver/modern was originally made and used by the mobs and were called, belly busters, gut gun, and stub nose, later on they took the title of Saturday Night Special, for other reasons. the true intent the mob took police issued 38sp and chopped the barrel was to be able to walk up in a crowd and quickly slam the gun in some unfortunate persons guts and empty the cylinder as shown on the history channel being done too JFK's assassin Lee Harvey Oswald. I would never use a stub nose past 7yds unless there was a dying situatiom the only benifits of a stub nose that I have found for me is in the home or a back up. I know and understand there is more perks and reasonings behind the stub nose just not pratical past 7yds the time it would take a person, to aim would cause them there life my state job requirement is 2 rnds 1.5 seconds on target. 0 to 7 yds, with a Glock 17 and a 3 stage holster, 3 locks yes! so I am a believer in the punch method or hip shot.

Sam1911
April 12, 2010, 08:08 AM
I'll toss in two cents to say: The rifling in a 2" or 1-?/?" barrel is plenty to impart spin on the bullet, and snub-nose revolvers have a well-earned reputation for astonishing accuracy -- if the shooter is well-practiced and skilled.

A snub-nose revolver gives up three things to its larger brothers: velocity, sight radius, and weight for taming recoil. They do NOT give up mechanical accuracy.

As usual, reports of their limitations as being only useful at "belly" distance say more about the reporter than the gun.

;)

surfinUSA
April 12, 2010, 08:55 AM
When I was hired in the early 80s we had to qualify out to 50 yards with anything we carried on or off duty including 2 inch revolvers. In reality, if you hit everthing out to the 25 yard line, you could have shot the last 6 from the 50 into the ground and still qualified. But make no doubt about it, in the right hands the 2 inch J frame or Colt Detective special is accurate out to and beyond 50 yards. Contrary to popular media belief these small, short barreled weapons are not inaccurate Saturday night specials.

The 2 inch J frame is a much harder gun to master than many people realize. If you want to make a beginner or your girlfriend hate shooting, start them off with a 2 inch 38.

Although I pretty much am never without my 642 and shoot it to remain proficient, I would much rather shoot a 2 inch detective special or K frame in any barrel length as they much more pleasant to shoot.

Sam1911
April 12, 2010, 09:15 AM
I've merged our two "snub nose" threads to get a more rounded discussion going on.

It is quite funny how the discussion splits so cleanly into the "Shove it in his gut -- nothing past 7 yards" camp and the "qualified at 50 yds -- practice at 100 yds with them" groups.

Wonder why the discussion diverges like that?

Sam1911
April 12, 2010, 09:28 AM
The snub nose revolver/modern was originally made and used by the mobs and were called, belly busters, gut gun, and stub nose,

Interesting. Patrick Sweeny wrote that the first snub-nosed revolver was the Colt Detective Special, in 1927.

But Jim Wilson wrote in Shooting Times: "The gun first became popular [in 1926] after J. H. FitzGerald, a Colt shooter, began to cut the Police Positive guns down to two inches for use as belly guns. In fact, FitzGerald went even further and bobbed the hammerspurs and cut out the front of the trigger guards in an attempt to make a real speed gun. They called them FitzGerald Specials, and many savvy gunmen preferred them for fighting guns.

So was Fitz just copying mobsters?

By the way, if you are a fan of little wheelguns, don't miss reading through "The Snubnose Files." http://www.snubnose.info/.

-------------------

later on they took the title of Saturday Night Special, for other reasons.I think you're confused. Saturday Night Special doesn't refer specifically to snub-nosed revolvers, but to cheap, low-quality handguns in general -- and the derivation of the name doesn't refer to the gun. From what I've read, a "Saturday Night Special" (usually said with some racial adjectives added) was actually a murder committed between members of a disfavorable racial group within the confines of their local community, usually "on the bad side of the tracks." Labeling a reported murder a "Saturday Night Special" (killing) was a way of indicating that the incident wasn't of much concern and investigation could wait until Monday morning. Later the term was transferred to the kind of cheap guns that poor urban folks could afford to buy.

(FWIW, the first gun pictured on the Wiki page under "Saturday Night Special" is an autoloader.)

surfinUSA
April 12, 2010, 09:41 AM
Sam you are correct the Saturday night special by most definitions was always an inexpesive, low quality, small handgun sold in areas of the commuity where the residents were unlikely to be able to afford a higher quality weapon.

Unfortunately many members in the non-firearms related media bagan to define any small handguns regardless of quality and price as "Saturday night specials".

As an aside, I remember watching a show on cable where a convicted murderer and gang member was interviewed and stated that the finest gun in America was the Raven 25 because it always worked and because of its low price you were never tempted to keep it rather than dispose of it. (no doubt in a local body of preferably saltwater).

David E
April 12, 2010, 12:14 PM
The snub nose revolver/modern was originally made and used by the mobs and were called, belly busters, gut gun, and stub nose,

The snub nose has existed as long as there have been handguns. The compact gun used to kill Lincoln was the snub nose of its day. The Colt 1862 Police and Pocket Navy percussion revolver was the 'snub nose' of its day, not to mention an untold number of revolvers that had their barrels cut flush with the frame or removed entirely. The short barreled "Sheriff's" and "Store Keeper" model of the venerable SAA was used by store keepers and bank tellers alike, not to mention SHERIFFS.

Saying that the "modern" snub nose was somehow the result of mobsters totally ignores history.

I would never use a stub nose past 7yds unless there was a dying situatiom. I know and understand there is more perks and reasonings behind the stub nose just not pratical past 7yds

The gun is entirely capable well past 7 and even 50 yds. When I was a cop, I had to qualify with my S&W Model 38 from 3 yds out to 50 yds. 15 of those rounds were fired from the 50. This included WEAK HAND shooting at 25 and 50 yds. We shot a B-27 target, 8 ring or better scored 5 pts. I had a score of 97.2%. I had one hit the target in the hip and one shot just missed the black entirely. The rest of the rds were 8 ring or better.

I know and understand that shooting a snubby is like shooting any other gun, but it may require a bit more practice to gain proficiency with it. Restricting a snub to 7 yds or less because YOU can't hit with it at further distances reveals more about the shooter than it does about the gun.

Youngrevolver
April 12, 2010, 12:16 PM
For all you "snub nose" haters who say they are all "belly guns" or ask "why do they even have sights?". You guys have obviously have not had the pleasure of shooting a 2 1/4" SP101. I can sit there all day and fire full load .357 mags and still hit COM at 25 yrds 97% of the time rapid fire/reg fire combined one handed and two handed. Most people who say these things and give them a bad rep are all inexperianced and or incompetent.

ScratchnDent
April 12, 2010, 12:25 PM
I practice with mine at 35 yards all the time. (Arbitrary distance selected because that's where the shade tree is at on my home range :D)

easyg
April 12, 2010, 01:01 PM
I like snub-nose revolvers for several reasons:

1) They're cool.

2) They can be loaded, put away, and totally forgotten about for years, but when you need them, they are almost guaranteed to work.

3) An airweight snubbie only weighs about 17 oz. fully loaded. Which is great for pocket carry.

4) The light and crisp single-action revolver trigger is a very nice option to have.

5) They're cool.



Having said that, there are several reasons that I dislike a snubbie:

1) 5-shots verses 10 shots (from my Glock 27).

2) When an auto jams it can usually be cleared in a few seconds. But when a revolver jams it is usually out of the fight.

3) Much easier to detail strip a Glock than it is a S&W Airweight revolver.

4) Cleaning my glock is a breeze. Cleaning a revolver is a PITA.

5) The heavy double-action trigger, especially in a light-weight and small revolver, takes LOTS of practice to achieve decent accuracy.

6) I seem to feel the recoil more when shooting a revolver. A 125g .357 magnum from a snubbie is downright painful, but a 125g .357Sig from a Glock 33 doesn't hurt at all and I can shoot it all day long.


http://i112.photobucket.com/albums/n165/allenXdog/HPIM6334.jpg


http://i112.photobucket.com/albums/n165/allenXdog/HPIM6365.jpg

Youngrevolver
April 12, 2010, 01:15 PM
"Revolver jamming"??? And the reason you feallin the pain is bc you have an exposed backstrap. I had a S&W M640 and had the same problem and I too hated fireing .357's out of it. Needless to say I have a Sp101 now, problem solved! And by no means am I bashing you I have just never heard of a revolver jamming. I've had a part break but same senerio could happen to a semi auto.

easyg
April 12, 2010, 01:44 PM
I have just never heard of a revolver jamming.
Shoot revolvers long enough and you will see it eventually.
There are a number of things that can cause it to happen.
Just to name a few: a bullet can jump crimp and extend slightly beyond the cylinder, the ejector rod can come unscrewed and back out enough to foul the cylinder, a casing or debris or unburnt powder can get wedged under the ejector star, debris or dirt can get between the cylinder and frame, the yoke screw can become loose, a squib round can get lodged between the cylinder and forcing cone....
I even once saw a bent moon-clip bind up a cylinder.

Now I'm not saying that jams are a frequent problem....they're not.
On a properly cleaned and maintained revolver, shooting clean and reliable ammo, jams are very rare.
But when a revolver does jam, it's not just a simple "tap, rack, and bang" fix like in most auto jams.

David E
April 12, 2010, 01:46 PM
Shoot revolvers long enough and you will see it eventually.

Keyword: EVENTUALLY

Cosmoline
April 12, 2010, 01:50 PM
To me the extra sight radius and balance of a 3" or at least 2.75" makes a tremendous difference. I'm not sure why, but it's consistent. I'm not sure if a revolver with a 2 3/4" barrel is still considered a "snub," but it shoots and handles more like a 4" model.

TexasBill
April 12, 2010, 01:51 PM
People were sawing barrels long before the days of Al Capone and the Purple Gang and pocket pistols have been around since at least the Nineteenth Century. The first "modern" factory snubbie was the Colt Detective Special of 1927 which was designed for (surprise!) detectives and other plain-clothes police officers.

Short-barreled revolvers, especially the alloy-framed ones, can be a handful with hot loads; that's where ZeBool made his mistake. An alloy frame and the boot grip combine the two enemies of comfortable shooting: too little weight and too little grip. I tamed my Model 637 with a set of grips from the Model 60 Pro. They look much bigger in the photo, but in reality they add just 0.56" to the height. It still fits in a pocket but the extra length means your pinkie finger isn't dangling and you might be surprised to learn just how important the pinkie is to a good grip. With the new grips and regular .38 Special ammunition, the Airweight is much more pleasant to shoot: I've put up to 200 rounds through mine in a day and did not have any soreness, something that was certainly not true with the small grips and +P rounds.

http://i560.photobucket.com/albums/ss44/TexasBillC/M637grip.jpg

A Ruger SP101 or a S&W Model 60 loaded with light .38 Specials (as in light bullets) would have been a much better choice. I have a Model 60 with a 3-inch barrel that is a lot of fun to shoot although you need to be careful with the .357 loads.

I haven't tried the long ranges yet but I routinely shoot at 15 yards and have no trouble with either snub.

Youngrevolver
April 12, 2010, 02:11 PM
Shoot revolvers long enough and you will see it eventually.
There are a number of things that can cause it to happen.
Just to name a few: a bullet can jump crimp and extend slightly beyond the cylinder, the ejector rod can come unscrewed and back out enough to foul the cylinder, a casing or debris or unburnt powder can get wedged under the ejector star, debris or dirt can get between the cylinder and frame, the yoke screw can become loose, a squib round can get lodged between the cylinder and forcing cone....
I even once saw a bent moon-clip bind up a cylinder.

Now I'm not saying that jams are a frequent problem....they're not.
On a properly cleaned and maintained revolver, shooting clean and reliable ammo, jams are very rare.
But when a revolver does jam, it's not just a simple "tap, rack, and bang" fix like in most auto jams.
That's one of the advantages to the SP. No yoke screw to come loose and the ejector rod it not screwed in. Now that you mentioned that I had a S&W M19 that the ejector rod always worked it's way loose with .357 loads. Another reason I only own rugers.

Youngrevolver
April 12, 2010, 02:14 PM
So I take back the "NEVER" comment :). A good qulaity revolver (ruger) will rarely ever jam.

10X
April 12, 2010, 02:16 PM
Try a 2 1/2" barreled Python, they are very accurate.

They are only limited by the shooter's ability, not the gun's ability.
I routinely shoot it at 25 yards.

Like any 357, you need decent grips.

JellyJar
April 12, 2010, 04:19 PM
For noob shooter post #7

They call me....

what is the proper name... snubby?

Mr snubby!

M2 Carbine
April 12, 2010, 04:33 PM
I practice with mine at 35 yards all the time. (Arbitrary distance selected because that's where the shade tree is at on my home range )
That's funny, because I do the same thing.

In the back yard the hotter it gets the further I back up under the trees.:D

David E
April 12, 2010, 06:03 PM
They call me...

Mr. snubby!

Um........they weren't referring to your firearm...........


:D:D:D

Guillermo
April 12, 2010, 06:17 PM
they are very difficult to master.

Very light guns of any category can be more difficult to master than heavier guns. The short sight radius is a challenge too. A smooth trigger and a heavier gun and they are not hard to master.

What is the effective range of a snub in double action for the average shooter? 5 to 10 yards?

I don't know, I don't hang with many average shooters. I can tell you that I would not stand at 100 yards and let Old Fuff shoot at me.

Cosmoline
April 12, 2010, 06:35 PM
As far as training, if I take the target out to 25 or 35 yards my technique changes totally. I take a lot longer to line up shots and tend to slow way down. For 10-15 yards I blast away quickly, shooting for speed and general placement rather than precision.

I think both methods are useful.

Guillermo
April 12, 2010, 06:39 PM
like all shooting.

slow is smooth

smooth is fast

ArmedBear
April 12, 2010, 06:53 PM
I have no problem hitting a target at 25 yards with a 642 using stock sights. With a laser, I can shoot small groups.

Like any gun, it does require the shooter to do his/her part.

TT
April 12, 2010, 08:17 PM
At 25 yards I can hit many targets with my 442- mountains, forests, larger canyons, you name it.

ArmedBear
April 12, 2010, 10:41 PM
You haven't tried very hard.

Can you hit a target at 25 yards with other guns?

easyg
April 12, 2010, 10:47 PM
That's one of the advantages to the SP. No yoke screw to come loose and the ejector rod it not screwed in.
Now you've peaked my curiosity....

On a Ruger revolver, what holds the yoke in place and how is the ejector rod held in place?

M2 Carbine
April 12, 2010, 10:51 PM
Now this was some fun shooting today.
I started out running a bunch of magazines through a S&W M&P 15-22, using that foot square white steel target in post #23. At 52 yards using iron sights and Red Dot sight it got boring after about 6 magazines. Just can't miss.


I had a 2 inch S&W Model 34 (22) in my pocket, so I shot 6 rounds at the 2x2 foot black steel target. The bullets hit in the bottom half of the target, with a couple hitting under the target. I raised the (adjustable) sights three clicks. Then shot 18 rounds at the white target. Four missed.
Now that's fun and will be a pretty good challenge to see how many shots I can shoot without a miss.

And being a 22 J Frame, it's cheap shooting to.:D

TT
April 13, 2010, 12:12 AM
Can you hit a target at 25 yards with other guns?

Sure, but I have to run up close to it first. :uhoh:

GojuBrian
April 13, 2010, 02:33 AM
I've only recently had the chance at a snubnose revolver. I wanted it for concealed carry so I bought a Ruger LCR with crimson trace grips.

It has put the rounds on target better than I expected it to. I typically shoot out to 10yards, but further just for fun. :)

M2 Carbine
April 13, 2010, 11:31 AM
I've only recently had the chance at a snubnose revolver. I wanted it for concealed carry so I bought a Ruger LCR with crimson trace grips.

It has put the rounds on target better than I expected it to. I typically shoot out to 10yards, but further just for fun.
A 2 inch revolver equipped with a Crimson Trace laser is awesome in low light and indoors.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v135/Bell406_206B/Mod_60_laser.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v135/Bell406_206B/CTlefthand15shots-1.jpg

I have the Crimson Trace on several revolvers, including a 3 inch S&W J Frame. Several weeks ago I was shooting until late. I thought I'd try the CT J frame at 52 yards. (standing, two hands) I was surprised how easy it was to keep all the shots on the 2x2 foot steel plate using the laser, with most hits in the 18 inch silhouette. That's better than I can do with iron sights with the little guns at that distance.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v135/Bell406_206B/laser52yards38SW.jpg

Guillermo
April 13, 2010, 01:36 PM
Good shootin Tex

FoMoGo
April 13, 2010, 05:11 PM
Whenever I go to the range, I make it a point to practice with mine out to about 40 yards.


Jim

Youngrevolver
April 13, 2010, 09:11 PM
The yoke on a ruger is held in by the trigger assembly. When the trigger assembly is dropped the yoke is released. And the ejector rod is fixed (does not spin w cylinder like a smith) I imagine it is held in by a clip of some sort.

M2 Carbine
April 13, 2010, 10:46 PM
Today I told a young neighbor I'd teach her how to shoot. The 2 or 3 inch S&W J Frame will be the second gun I'll have her use. I'll try to keep track of how fast she progresses.
I'm betting in the first couple hours she will be handling the little gun pretty well.

S&Wfan
April 14, 2010, 01:06 AM
They are as accurate as a longer barreled revolver. What makes them seem less accurate is a shorter sight radius, and this makes many people a poorer shot. It need not be that way!!!

Mount a scope on one and you'd see!

No, the challenge is to take the time to "see" a perfect sight picture . . . and to also make sure you are using perfect technique, for short guns will expose your weaknesses in technique.

Here's my little M36, shot at distances of ten and twenty-five yards.

http://216.77.188.54/coDataImages/p/Groups/363/363373/folders/277718/2216021M36at10yds.b.jpg

http://216.77.188.54/coDataImages/p/Groups/363/363373/folders/277718/2248828Firsttarget.jpg

http://216.77.188.54/coDataImages/p/Groups/363/363373/folders/277718/2217494148gn.wadcutterat25yds-shootslow.jpg

David E
April 14, 2010, 10:26 PM
It looks like you, your snubby and 148 WC's all get along very well !

Nice shooting.

Checkman
April 15, 2010, 05:10 PM
I own three snubbies.
S&W Model 49 Bodyguard
Colt Detective Special
Colt Lawman Mk III w/2" barrel

They are very accurate revolvers if you know what you are doing. They are concealable (even the mid size Mk III) and yes they are cool. I like them and I hope to add more to my collection.

Rexster
April 15, 2010, 06:29 PM
It has been quite a while since I practiced with a snubby at more than 15 yards, because of readily available range facilities, but I am able to be "effective" at 15 yards with an SP101 or J-snub, for sure. I used to practice out to 25 yards, and was "effective" then.

My eyesight is the limiting factor now; the front sight is now a fuzzball that wants to fill the entire rear notch, so I can only speculate if I can still be effective past 15 yards with a snubby.

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