long range shooting with .375 rum


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Snake
May 5, 2010, 06:45 PM
I've been researching as much as i can on the subject and not finding much on it. im interested in 500+yrds up to 1000yrds... not 1000+yards or anything. Im not tring to get .338 lapua accuracey but i'd like to have a big bore longer range caliber in my rifle collection to play with.

I will be reloading and im trying to find anyone who's using this caliber for some distance hunting,bench rest shooting,etc. I'd like to find a good ballistic coefficent projectile. Also like to find a scope thats able to handle this recoil and a muzzle brake. I won't go cheap on a scope so $700-$1000 is ok

Any advice on where to look answers or another forum for this? I went this route cause the .338 Lapua was much more expensive and rifles were much $$$ also. Plus I like the Niche calibers to make work. Hence i own a 10mm and .357 sig set of Glocks.:)

Thanks

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MachIVshooter
May 5, 2010, 06:52 PM
If target shooting is your intended use, the .300 RUM or .338 RUM will be better suited. Not much in the way of match grade .375" pills, and you'll be tolerating alot of recoil (trust me). The .338 RUM is balistically identical to .338 Lapua. But you're gonna have to handload, as there's no factory match ammo for it. Handloading also pretty much negates the ammo cost difference between .338 RUM and .338 Lapua.

The .375 RUM is well suited to dangerous game or long-range big game, but not for benchrest.

P.S.

If you wanna get into .338 Lapua without breaking the bank, check out the Armalite AR-30.

Abel
May 5, 2010, 08:07 PM
I'd use a 300 Winchester Magnum. But a 300WSM or even a 308, 7mm-08, or 260 Rem. will punch good holes at 1000 yards.

C-grunt
May 5, 2010, 09:43 PM
Ive heard the .338 RUM is very close to the Lapua Mag. Ive never heard of the .375 RUM but I dont think there are any long range precision rounds in .375. I would think getting match grade bullets for .338 would be easier than .375.

redneck2
May 5, 2010, 09:56 PM
It isn't the bore size that makes it better for long range. BC of the bullets is a big factor, (probably THE) major factor after the launch platform.

I'm using a 7mm Rem Mag. 8x32 Burris Black Diamond Mil-Dot will do what you need. You can get 162 grain Hornady A-Max's that have a super high BC and it doesn't pound the snot out of you every time the trigger is pulled.

If you're set on something semi exotic, get a 6.5x284. There are a ton of really high quality 6.5 bullets that have won a ton of matches in this caliber. Using a .375 RUM may impress your impressionable friends, but won't be particularly effective.

Ridgerunner665
May 5, 2010, 10:11 PM
The .375 bore is not well known for long range work (nor is the .325 bore, 8mm)....I'd stick with .30 or .338 caliber.

300RUM
338RUM

Or wildcat a 6.5mmRUM...LOL.

dubbleA
May 5, 2010, 10:16 PM
Ive heard the .338 RUM is very close to the Lapua Mag. Ive never heard of the .375 RUM but I dont think there are any long range precision rounds in .375. I would think getting match grade bullets for .338 would be easier than .375.

Though expensive to shoot, there is the 375 CheyTac, it pushes a 350gr pill to appx 3200fps and shines at extreme ranges.

Sierra makes a 350 gr .375 Match King, it does take a fast twist to stabilize them.

375shooter
May 5, 2010, 10:32 PM
If you want something more just to "play" with and since you're not really looking for precision long range accuracy and want a "big bore" caliber at a reasonable price for long range hunting and target shooting, I think the 375 RUM may fit OK. It will serve better as a hunting round though because there are no aerodynamic target bullets available in this caliber. The bullet choices are restricted to hunting bullets, such as Nosler 260 gr Accubond, Sierra 300 gr BT, and Barnes 270 or 300 gr TSX.

Maverick223
May 5, 2010, 10:57 PM
I agree with the above, the .375RUM is far from ideal, tremendous recoil, expensive to load for, and few match grade projectiles (which are made for the .375CheyTac). OTOH the .338RUM or .338LM will somewhat negate all of the above, but is still quite expensive and recoil isn't pleasant (thus requiring a loud, blasty muzzle brake, which I personally despise). I would look closely at the .300WM, 7mmRM, or even the lowly .260Rem. unless you have deep pockets and enjoy muzzle blast (which on a beast like you describe feels to me like going from 20k ft to sea level in a millisecond).

:)

saturno_v
May 5, 2010, 11:48 PM
The 338 WM, especially in a longer barrel (26" or more) is still a good long range performing cartridge with very good knockout potential at extreme ranges and "humane" cost for ammo.

If you only care about punching paper, the 300 Mags and Super Mags are the obvious choice (cost + bullet selection)

Within the same barrel length, the 338 WM is just a hair less powerful than the much more costly 338 Lapua (100-150 fps of difference)

My Weatherby Vanguard in 338 ("only" 24" barrel) is capable to launch a 300 gr. MatchKing bullet at 2550 fps...not too shabby....I bet a 26" pipe can do significantly better...

Deer taken at 890y with a custom 338 WM with 28" barrel on a Rem 700 action.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9RlHnRlhYJw

sonier
May 6, 2010, 12:11 AM
jeeze 375 rum is a power house recoil is gona be god awful even with break. a slight muscle flinch is going to effect accuracy at 1000 yards jeeze a flinch at 500 yards and i miss horribly with my 30-06. if you bought the rifle id say big mistake for that work but i just am going to say find the lightest boat tail spitzer and your set but the doping in drop is gona be rough too good luck.

Zak Smith
May 6, 2010, 12:21 AM
For target shooting primarily within 1200 yards, I recommend .260REM.

For target shooting primarily within 1500 yards, I recommend 7mm WSM or RM.

The .338 RUM is the "poor man's" .338 Lapua Magnum, and has the same ballistics. However, unless you need the mass on target, it only has a slight edge over the 7's.

.375 RUM is unlikely to have a good case capacity to bore ratio for the high BC bullets you'd want to use, and .375 has a pretty poor selection.

saturno_v
May 6, 2010, 12:28 AM
The .338 RUM is the "poor man's" .338 Lapua Magnum, and has the same ballistics. However, unless you need the mass on target, it only has a slight edge over the 7's.


I do not understand why the 338 RUM si considered the "poor man 338 Lapua" other than just literally the price of the ammo (and commercial rifles)

According to the Hodgdon and VihtaVuori reloading data center, the 338 RUM is ballistically superior to the Lapua (with the same barrel length)

Zak Smith
May 6, 2010, 12:42 AM
I didn't see .338 RUM in Edition 8 of the VV manual (http://www.lapua.com/fileadmin/user_upload/esitteet/VihtavuoriReloadingGuideEdition8.pdf), but I find the Hodgdon data somewhat strange. One of the loads we used in .338LM here is 96 grains of Retumbo with a 250 at 2950 fps from a TRG-42 or AI-AWSM, yet they claim 100 fps less with more powder.

I have shot both cartridges side by side (and loaded for them) and the ballistic performance is essentially identical.

saturno_v
May 6, 2010, 01:01 AM
Zak

I think the explanation is that the Hodgdon Data is for 24" barrels while the rifles you mentioned I believe they have 27" barrels.

Zak Smith
May 6, 2010, 01:04 AM
I didn't see the barrel length listed anywhere on the load data page.

saturno_v
May 6, 2010, 01:31 AM
Zak

On the Hodgdon Reload Data center website, once you load the cartridge data you are interested in, if you click on the "Print" button, a small window will open containing the table to be printed and in the header is mentioned the barrel length.

For example, this is the printout for the 338 Lapua

http://vaygzq.blu.livefilestore.com/y1pnSdrXFJQwzyogNTcuru0LoSnfz7xpegkGN9BAn-DYdIAaan6E9hZqY9j3LZpYIFyPy3idGZQAYRHvek-pCpyia5pJXfzFYyA/Hodgdon%20338%20Lapua%20Magnum.jpg

Zak Smith
May 6, 2010, 01:36 AM
Figures, I didn't click the print button.

saturno_v
May 6, 2010, 01:42 AM
The only reason I know this is beacuse I called Hodgdon to ask them about the barrel length reference for their reloading data...:):D

Jefferson Herb
May 6, 2010, 02:28 AM
I've owned a .338 RUM since they came out[or shortly there after],and HAD the old style recoil pad.You will want to put a Limbsaver or something like it on,recoil is brutal and 3 rounds heats the barrel up very warm in a sporter.
I believe there are 300gr match bullets from Sierra,never tried to get any.
Retumbo powder will give you a flash even in daytime with 100gr and 225 accubond, h4831 accurate[85gr w/250gk,2700fps]and velocity is good enough for dead.Going to try H1000 in future,fortunate enough to have some fed match std and mag to use if I don't get carried away.
If Recoil is an issue[and it is even for me]a coyote hunter here just had a new rifle built with a 34in pacnor bl in 6.5 - 7stw wildcat,it's smoking 120s at 3550 across the chronograph and it's still off the top.He has it for long range coyote sniping.This will use 50bmg powders no doubt.
Good luck in your quest.
FWIW Keep scope as low as possible,big scopes look cool but smaller dia scopes fit low and don't allow the magnums to slap the tar out of your face.

berettashotgun
May 6, 2010, 03:42 AM
Do you OWN a 375 RUM?
All in all a 375 RUM is pretty much concentrated awesome with a loud bang.:evil:
A break and proper pad really helped mine, it came with a 26"barrel and ate up a set of leupold rings and bases with 300gr bullet over a lot of powder. I won't post the amount, but generally over 92gr and under 100gr with powders similar to 4350 burn rate will get you into a reasonable sweet spot with the 375 bore.
I don't know if any African Grand Slam tungsten core bullets are still around - I bought mine 6-7 years ago ( I think :confused:) and they shoot very accurately to 500 - under a MOA with a trigger and a 5 minute (between) shot pace. Factory trigger was horrible.....'nuff said.
Also had to pin the floorplate - seems recoil was more than the latch spring could take:cuss:. thanks for the engineering thoroughness....remington
Recoil is very tolerable, but blast is what you expect from 55-62K psi being released from a 3/8th hole.
I wanted a rifle in every RUM caliber; that is the sole reason I have a 375 or a 7mm in that case.
The 338 RUM is nice, but a pound of powder gives you about 72-75 rounds - likewise with all of these huge cases.
Bullets are costly, about 2-3X the price of very nice Berger 6.5 or 7mm pills, and aren't commonly known ( or used ) as "target " quality.
You are STUCK:fire: with remmy brass!:cuss:
I decided to try a 6.5 & 7mm RSUM - one wildcat and the other "factory" with a switch barrel set-up.
As far as from the bench - the 6.5 saum is cool enough for my ego:cool:, but it is looking like the 7mm is a (MUCH!) better caliber to go with on that case.

I sometimes use a 376 to hunt with, only because it is a better balance for me.
Now a 376 necked down to a 6.5.......
ouch..... I think a certain mfg. has already started that wildcat rolling with the RCM cases.

Snake
May 6, 2010, 03:10 PM
Thanks,guys! I do own a xcr 700 in .375 and only shot it 4 times with open sights. The recoil was definatly a pain but im not affected like most people in my frame(165lbs.5'9"). I can tollerate it for a bit but would need a brake and pad for sure.

I wanted to weigh down the rifle a big in the stock ends. I'll take the numbers and possibly go for the .338 RUM because its .338 pills are easier to find with better BC numbers. I should have done my math a bit more.

Now....would a 27"-28" barrel in .375rum or .338rum help velocity that much? If i put on a brake I might just go with a custom barrel/brake combo.

Maverick223
May 6, 2010, 03:48 PM
Now....would a 27"-28" barrel in .375rum or .338rum help velocity that much?Yes, and more so for the 338 (because the smaller caliber keeps pressures up longer).

Just make sure you are alright with the enormous blast (much more than now), and the additional noise (also much greater) when you add that noisemaker to the front.

:)

mjyeagle
June 23, 2010, 07:22 PM
i put just a break on my 375 rum and i can shoot it all day long most people dont realize that it wallops you but does not hurt with practice you just have to let it take you and RELAX it throws my shoulder back about a foot when i shoot i also have a 460 s&w and the same rules apply the biggest roadblock for most people is they are scared and flinch wich kills accuracy but just my opnion

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